23 min

Circulation November 1, 2022 Issue Circulation on the Run

    • Life Sciences

This week, please join authors Kevin Roedl and Sebastian Wolfrum, as well as Associate Editor Mark Link as they discuss the article "Temperature Control After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Randomized Clinical Trial."
Dr. Carolyn Lam:
Welcome to Circulation on the Run, your weekly podcast summary, and backstage pass to the Journal and its editors. We are your cohosts. I'm Dr. Carolyn Lam, Associate Editor from the National Heart Center, and Duke National University of Singapore.
Dr. Greg Hundley:
And I'm Dr. Greg Hundley, Associate Editor and Director of the Pauley Heart Center at VCU Health in Richmond, Virginia. Well, Carolyn, this week's feature, very interesting, a randomized clinical trial of temperature control after in-hospital cardiac arrest. But before we get to that exciting study, let's grab a cup of coffee, and jump in and discuss some of the other articles in the issue. Carolyn, would you like to go first?
Dr. Carolyn Lam:
Yes. Starting with a great quiz. So Greg, which is better? How about this? It's multiple choice. Is it A; transradial, or B; transfemoral access, in terms of post-procedural mortality?
Dr. Greg Hundley:
I'm going to go with transradial. It has been, hopefully, I'm okay on this. It just seems so many fewer complications.
Dr. Carolyn Lam:
But that's exactly that we need to meta-analyze the studies that have been done. Exactly what this paper did, led by Professor Valgimigli, from USI in Lugano, Switzerland. So what they did is, they performed an individual patient data meta-analysis of 21,600 patients, enrolled in seven multi-center randomized control trials, comparing the transradial with transfemoral access, among patients undergoing coronary angiography with or without PCI. And they found that transradial access was associated with a lower incidence of the primary outcome of all-cause mortality, and the co-primary outcome of major bleeding at 30 days, compared to transfemoral access.
There was also evidence for reductions in major adverse cardiac and cerebral vascular events, net adverse clinical events, vascular complications, excess site bleeding, and blood transfusion. MI, stroke, and stent thrombosis, did not differ. And crossover was higher in the transradial access group.
At predefined subgroup analysis, the authors confirmed that the benefit observed the transradial group was generally consistent across the majority of pre-specified subgroups, except for those with significant baseline anemia. Patients with baseline anemia appear to derive a substantial mortality benefit with transradial access rather than transoral access, compared to those with mild or no anemia.
So, the authors concluded, that the meta-analysis provides evidence that transradial access should be considered the preferable access site for PCI, in patients with acute coronary syndrome, supporting most recent recommendations on the preferential use of this radial approach. So you were right, Greg.
Dr. Greg Hundley:
Very nice, Carolyn. A really important piece of science to disclose to our listeners, in that hurried state, and moving quickly door to balloon times, et cetera. And here we find another positive outcome in study result for transradial approaches.
Well Carolyn, as we know, my next paper, it's really going to come to us from the world of preclinical science. And it pertains to hypertension, which is a common cardiovascular disease, and is related to both genetic and environmental factors. But the mechanisms linking the interplay between the domains of genetics and the environment have not been well studied.
Now, DNA methylation, a classical epigenetic modification, not only regulates gene expression, but is also quite susceptible to environmental factors. Thereby, linking environmental factors to genetic modifications. So therefore, Carolyn, these authors, including Professor Jingzhou Chen, from Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, and the Chinese Academy of Medical Sci

This week, please join authors Kevin Roedl and Sebastian Wolfrum, as well as Associate Editor Mark Link as they discuss the article "Temperature Control After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Randomized Clinical Trial."
Dr. Carolyn Lam:
Welcome to Circulation on the Run, your weekly podcast summary, and backstage pass to the Journal and its editors. We are your cohosts. I'm Dr. Carolyn Lam, Associate Editor from the National Heart Center, and Duke National University of Singapore.
Dr. Greg Hundley:
And I'm Dr. Greg Hundley, Associate Editor and Director of the Pauley Heart Center at VCU Health in Richmond, Virginia. Well, Carolyn, this week's feature, very interesting, a randomized clinical trial of temperature control after in-hospital cardiac arrest. But before we get to that exciting study, let's grab a cup of coffee, and jump in and discuss some of the other articles in the issue. Carolyn, would you like to go first?
Dr. Carolyn Lam:
Yes. Starting with a great quiz. So Greg, which is better? How about this? It's multiple choice. Is it A; transradial, or B; transfemoral access, in terms of post-procedural mortality?
Dr. Greg Hundley:
I'm going to go with transradial. It has been, hopefully, I'm okay on this. It just seems so many fewer complications.
Dr. Carolyn Lam:
But that's exactly that we need to meta-analyze the studies that have been done. Exactly what this paper did, led by Professor Valgimigli, from USI in Lugano, Switzerland. So what they did is, they performed an individual patient data meta-analysis of 21,600 patients, enrolled in seven multi-center randomized control trials, comparing the transradial with transfemoral access, among patients undergoing coronary angiography with or without PCI. And they found that transradial access was associated with a lower incidence of the primary outcome of all-cause mortality, and the co-primary outcome of major bleeding at 30 days, compared to transfemoral access.
There was also evidence for reductions in major adverse cardiac and cerebral vascular events, net adverse clinical events, vascular complications, excess site bleeding, and blood transfusion. MI, stroke, and stent thrombosis, did not differ. And crossover was higher in the transradial access group.
At predefined subgroup analysis, the authors confirmed that the benefit observed the transradial group was generally consistent across the majority of pre-specified subgroups, except for those with significant baseline anemia. Patients with baseline anemia appear to derive a substantial mortality benefit with transradial access rather than transoral access, compared to those with mild or no anemia.
So, the authors concluded, that the meta-analysis provides evidence that transradial access should be considered the preferable access site for PCI, in patients with acute coronary syndrome, supporting most recent recommendations on the preferential use of this radial approach. So you were right, Greg.
Dr. Greg Hundley:
Very nice, Carolyn. A really important piece of science to disclose to our listeners, in that hurried state, and moving quickly door to balloon times, et cetera. And here we find another positive outcome in study result for transradial approaches.
Well Carolyn, as we know, my next paper, it's really going to come to us from the world of preclinical science. And it pertains to hypertension, which is a common cardiovascular disease, and is related to both genetic and environmental factors. But the mechanisms linking the interplay between the domains of genetics and the environment have not been well studied.
Now, DNA methylation, a classical epigenetic modification, not only regulates gene expression, but is also quite susceptible to environmental factors. Thereby, linking environmental factors to genetic modifications. So therefore, Carolyn, these authors, including Professor Jingzhou Chen, from Fuwai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, and the Chinese Academy of Medical Sci

23 min