100 episodes

Class Dismissed Podcast is here to inspire educators through story and keep them up-to-date with the news that affects them directly.



Plus, we'll leave you with a bright idea in education that you can apply in your community.



So relax and enjoy the lighthearted 30-45 minute episodes, while doing chores around the house or commuting to work.



Regular Co-Hosts include Principal - Kristina Pollard, Teacher- Lissa Pruett, Education Data Expert-Russ Davis, and Journalist- Nick Ortego



We would love to hear from you! If you have a suggestion for the show or want to write to say hello, email us at info@classdismissedpodcast.com or find us on Twitter @classdismiss

Class Dismissed SchoolStatus - The Podcast for Teachers

    • How To
    • 4.9 • 60 Ratings

Class Dismissed Podcast is here to inspire educators through story and keep them up-to-date with the news that affects them directly.



Plus, we'll leave you with a bright idea in education that you can apply in your community.



So relax and enjoy the lighthearted 30-45 minute episodes, while doing chores around the house or commuting to work.



Regular Co-Hosts include Principal - Kristina Pollard, Teacher- Lissa Pruett, Education Data Expert-Russ Davis, and Journalist- Nick Ortego



We would love to hear from you! If you have a suggestion for the show or want to write to say hello, email us at info@classdismissedpodcast.com or find us on Twitter @classdismiss

    How to help fellow teachers in crisis

    How to help fellow teachers in crisis

    It's no secret that the stress of being an educator can take a toll on any teacher's mental health. But High School Humanities teacher, Henry Seton, is on a mission to let his fellow educators know the importance of talking openly about it. 



    "It is OK to talk about the other ways you cope—your CrossFit and spin classes, your yoga and meditation sessions, even how hard you hit the caffeine or alcohol," says Seton. "But mentioning a therapy session is usually seen as a sign of weakness, an awkward overshare, keeping it too real."



    Seton believes we need to normalize discussions about mental health in the education workspace.



    In two recent Educational Leadership articles, Seton kept it very real. He shared his own experience of how a personal tragedy sent him into a depression, and he also wrote about challenges he faced after moving from Boston to Ohio and was forced to navigate a new school district. 



    Seton is a superstar teacher. When teaching near Boston, he would have people from across the city come and observe his class and his students preformed exemplary on state tests. But "behind the scenes," Seton admits that he was barely making it and dealing with burnout.



    In Episode 179 of Class Dismissed, Seton tells us how at one point in his career, he almost entered into what he describes as  a "doom loop," a negative and vicious cycle. He even consider quitting. But he shares how he broke free of his doom loop and he gives us tips on how school leaders can identify and break the negative cycle within their team.  



    To hear our full discussion, listen to Class Dismissed Podcast on iTunes or your favorite podcasting app.



    All Rights Reserved. Class Dismissed Podcast 2017-2021

    • 44 min
    How to keep that flame for educating lit

    How to keep that flame for educating lit

    Softening the blow for new teachers

    In Episode 178 of Class Dismissed we talk with Chase Mielke about ways new teachers can keep their flame for educating ignited. After a decade of reflection Mielke compiled a list of what he calls his five “Passion Stokers” for educators.



    * Find a positive tribe

    * Curate the good, don’t hoard the bad

    * Forgive

    * Own your present and future

    * Craft your calling



    Mielke, who has been teaching for over a decade in Michigan is quick to acknowledge that many teachers will fight burnout at some point and he believes much of that burnout will come from something other than students.



    “The main cause I think stems from a lot of conflicts and perceptions that a are adult-driven rather than student-driven,” says Milke.



    Mielke says a lack of autonomy or respect, colleague conflict, and struggles connecting with parents are leading causes of teacher burnout.

    Practice what you preach

    Mielke, who authored “The Burnout Cure: Learning to Love Teaching Again”, says there was a time in his life that he considered quitting teaching himself.



    He had been teaching for 8 years but he says he felt so bogged down by extra stuff. Ironically, he was teaching a positive psychology class and he decided to double down on what he was teaching. In a way, he was counseling himself when he was writing “The Burnout Cure.”



    “It was like, what were that things that have help me? What were the things that I’ve talked about a lot. And how do I put those in language that any teacher could use to help them reestablish their love.”



    Much of Mielke’s notoriety in the education community stems from a blog and video he produced back in 2014.



    The high school teacher and instructional coach found himself unable to sleep one night and wrote: “What students really need to hear.” The post has been read around 4 million times and the corresponding video (below) has been watched almost a million times.





    To hear Mielke talk in-depth about each of his five “passion stokers”, listen to Episode 178 of the Class Dismissed Podcast on iTunes or your favorite podcasting app.



    All Rights Reserved. Class Dismissed Podcast 2017-2021

    • 36 min
    Finding the silver lining in education amidst a pandemic

    Finding the silver lining in education amidst a pandemic

    The best of 2020!

    In Episode 177 of Class Dismissed we reflect on the best things that 2020 and the COVID-19 pandemic thrust upon the education ecosystem.



    For example, 2020 helped normalize connectivity, renewed a focus on family, and has school districts examining the efficiency and effectiveness of their school calendar.



    During this episode, we also reflected on some of our favorite interviews of the year.



    Can schools help overcome the disadvantage of poverty?

    *

    How one educator tackled three natural disasters



    *

    Why it’s crucial to make an “emotional deposit” with students



    *

    Harvard Professor: Here’s how to bring empathy and SEL into your classroom





    Listen to Episode 177 of the Class Dismissed Podcast on your favorite podcast app or iTunes.



    All Rights Reserved. Class Dismissed Podcast 2017-2021.



     

    • 35 min
    Are Open Educational Resources (OER) right for your district?

    Are Open Educational Resources (OER) right for your district?

    Each year public schools spend millions of dollars on copyright-protected textbooks. Districts do this even though we now live in a digitally dominated world full of open-sourced books. But there's an alternative.



    The movement of using Open Educational Resources (OER) has been growing over the past five years. 



    In 2017 Class Dismissed interviewed Cable Green, the director of Open Education with Creative Commons. Green made a compelling argument for OER, but we wanted to learn more. For instance, what is it like to be on the front lines of a school-wide OER roll out? 



    How much more work does it take? Are Open Education Resources better than traditional textbooks? Have there been advantages to using OER during the COVID-19 pandemic?



    In Episode 176, we caught up with Dan McDowell, the director of learning and innovation of the Grossmont Union High school district in San Diego County, Califonia.



    McDowell and his colleagues have been gradually transferring their curriculum to OER over the past five years.



    The journey to an OER district



    McDowell will admit that transitioning to OER has been challenging, but there are also many benefits. "It takes a lot of time and work to develop these resources," McDowell says. 



    The Grossmont Union High Schoo District pays teachers extra to help gather and vet the OER materials and then develop the instructional materials around them. They set up committees and which in turn discover what's out there. 



    McDowell references a great website called CK12 that has opened licensed textbooks on it. He says they then modify and add supplemental resources like videos and additional readings to those existing resources. 



    McDowell says all of their science course are now using this OER format, so they no longer provide textbooks for their main science classes. They're also making good progress on Social Science and ninth and tenth grade English.



    "This isn't like a change everything sort of thing," says McDowell. "It's a see where it fits and see where we get the most bang for our buck." 



    In our full conversation with Dan McDowell, you'll learn... 



    * What OER looks like for the student. 

    * If OER is a useful resource during virtual learning. 

    * If McDowell has any regrets about making the transition.

    * Why buy-in from the teachers is critical.



    You can also see all of the Grossmont Union High Schoo District OER projects on their website. 



    In Episode 176 of Class Dismissed we talk in-depth with Whiting about how to help students become media literate by identifying native advertising, influencers, and media bias. To learn more listen to Class Dismissed Podcast on iTunes or your favorite podcasting app.



    All Rights Reserved. Class Dismissed Podcast 2017-2020

    • 50 min
    Tackling "fake news" in the classroom without being political

    Tackling "fake news" in the classroom without being political

    How educators can navigate media literacy in a politically charged environment?

    Let’s face it. We've been living in a politically divided country. On Twitter, President Donald Trump listed the New York Times, NBC, ABC, CBS, and CNN as the “enemy of the people,” and he’s on record saying that 80% of media is fake news.



    So what responsibility do teachers have to reconcile these comments with students? And how do educators wade into the political turmoil without getting complaints from politically charged parents?

    Tackle fake news without being political

    “Lots of educators are afraid of having that talk,” says Jaquelyn Whiting. “And I understand why they’re afraid of having that talk.”

    “I BEGIN EVERY CONVERSATION ABOUT MEDIA LITERACY BY SAYING, WHILE WE ARE IN THE ROOM TOGETHER, WE ARE NOT GOING TO USE THE TERM ‘FAKE NEWS’,”

    Whiting is the co-author of News Literacy: The Keys to Combating Fake News. She’s also a library media specialist at Wilton High School in Connecticut. Whiting has made it her mission to inform students and in some cases colleagues on how to identify media bias



    “I begin every conversation about media literacy by saying, while we are in the room together, we are not going to use the term ‘fake news’,”  Whiting says she’ll feel successful as an educator if she can remove the term from the students’ vocabulary.



    “When that term is invoked. It tends to be invoked with the intention of shutting down dialogue.”



    Whiting asks her students to think about three things when evaluating news.



    * Information – What’s happening

    * Misinformation – When someone tries to convey to you what’s happening and they make an unintentional mistake. You know the mistake was unintentional when they come back and write a retraction or clarification to correct the error.

    * Disinformation – When someone tries to convey incorrect information to you for their own personal gain.



    Whiting says dividing news into these three categories allows her and her students to have a quality conversation about how we understand the world.



    “We can start to differently about the choices that journalists are making when they choose to print or not print something,’ says Whiting.



    Whiting says that the political climate is what it is and we have to learn to operate in it productively.



    In Episode 175 of Class Dismissed we talk in-depth with Whiting about how to help students become media literate by identifying native advertising, influencers, and media bias. To learn more listen to Class Dismissed Podcast on iTunes or your favorite podcasting app.

    Other Show Notes

    Will teachers get priority for COVID 19 vaccines?

    New York City Will Reopen Elementary Schools and Reduce Hybrid Learning

    All Rights Reserved. Class Dismissed Podcast 2017-2020

    • 54 min
    Jennifer Serravallo's strategies for connecting with students online

    Jennifer Serravallo's strategies for connecting with students online

    Typically, authors write books with the hope that their words will live in perpetuity. Texts that will be read and analyzed for decades to come. But in July of 2020, best-selling author Jennifer Serravallo began writing a book that she hoped would have a short shelf life. Her new book would be packed full of strategies for learning virtually.







    In one intense month, Serravallo and a small team at Heinemann wrote and published "Connecting Students Online." The objective was to create a tool for teachers working through the COVID-19 pandemic.









    If all goes according to plan, Serravallo's book will act as a bridge to get educators through this school year. Scientists will then deliver a vaccine, and we all return to the classroom sooner rather than later.







    Serravallo is no stranger to teachers. She's guided thousands of educators with "The Reading Strategies Book," "The Writing Strategies Book," and "Understanding Texts and Readers."







    "Connecting Students Online" was sparked by Serravallo churning out ideas on her Facebook Group in the Spring of 2020.







    "Here's an idea for scheduling, here's an idea for keeping your lessons brief, here's an idea for conferring with kids," Serravallo would post in the group. "I was also getting a lot of feedback from teachers in that group."







    At the time, it didn't occur to her to put all these ideas in a book, but in late July, she polled her Facebook group about how she could help. In just a few hours, thousands of educators responded. They needed more strategies for teaching remotely -- "Connecting Students Online, Strategies for Remote Teaching and Learning" was born.







    In Episode 174 of Class Dismissed, Serravallo shares with us some of her favorite strategies for remote learning and opens up about how we're doing as a society of educators.

    Listen to episode 174 of the Class Dismissed Podcast episodes on iTunes or your favorite podcasting app.

    All Rights Reserved. Class Dismissed Podcast 2017-2020

    • 54 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
60 Ratings

60 Ratings

NanaJHP ,

Excellent guests

The co-host segments are interesting and relevant and the guest interviews are first rate.

jjubran ,

Brings education topics to the forefront

Often our public education is only discussed when things go wrong. It's great to hear about the positive strides educators are making for our students.

Donny Phase ,

Tune in now

Acoustically sound, interesting information -- Class Dismissed gives a non-filler take on the modern day educator's problems and solutions. Educator or parent? Doesn't matter. Do yourself a favor and get informed.

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