37 episodes

Tales from those on the front lines of dealing with clients. Tales of difficult clients, complex situations, relationship management - and how massive client management problems were solved, and what they learned. Largely those running agencies, but all across different professional services.

Client Horror Stories Client Horror Stories

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

Tales from those on the front lines of dealing with clients. Tales of difficult clients, complex situations, relationship management - and how massive client management problems were solved, and what they learned. Largely those running agencies, but all across different professional services.

    • video
    That time when you stepped in to put out the fires in a project, only to have the head of the project play matches and throw gasoline everywhere (with Mark Herschberg)

    That time when you stepped in to put out the fires in a project, only to have the head of the project play matches and throw gasoline everywhere (with Mark Herschberg)

    In this episode, Mark Herschberg, a Chief Technology Officer and author shares his story when he was working under “Evil Corp” (a code name for the company).
    At that time, he was assigned to a company division that was working on creating a new type of video service/ video marketplace platform where viewers could watch content from movie studios and tv stations under controlled access. With this wonderful idea in mind, Evil Corp put out a press release stating their release date.
    The catch is that Evil Corp wasn't very good at doing projects like this, so they decided to get a vendor to do it for them. But there’s more…The funny thing is the vendor wasn’t optimized for this project, and they wanted to bring in 2 more vendors that had the technology that Evil Corp needed.
    By the time Mark was brought into the company, the project was launched. Instead of being a convenient video platform, everything was done manually by phone and email. Plus, there was a game of broken telephone going on between the 3 vendors and the internal team of the company.
    As Mark said, everything was on fire, and he was there to put out the fires. By the end of the episode, Mark and Morgan talked about the essence of management, communication, and problem-solving, which could be helpful to you as well! 
     
    Morgan Friedman
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    • 50 min
    • video
    That time when your client didn’t pay his bill, and you ended up getting a 1000 word text from his new wife instead (with Matt Davis)

    That time when your client didn’t pay his bill, and you ended up getting a 1000 word text from his new wife instead (with Matt Davis)

    In this episode, Matthew Davis of Davis Business Law, reveals how his law firm decided to not do family law anymore because of this client-horror story.
    It all started when a client came to his law firm where his ex-wife hated his guts, and she had a very good reason to because he got another woman pregnant. Still, he thought that his ex-wife was interfering with his relationship with the kids, which she legitimately was, but he wanted to be the victim in the whole ordeal.
    The client kept coming to Matt, asking him to help him with his case, and Matt tried to explain to him what would happen in court and what the judge would possibly come up with in his case. Matt started to feel sorry for him, and he was pretty persistent, so Matt decided to help him.
    The time came when they took the case to court, the judge was losing his temper with Matt’s client, and Matt ended up being the bad guy instead. At the end of the episode, Matt shared some interesting concepts about the drama triangle game, the grudge match, and some ways to incorporate psychology to prevent troublesome issues.
    Morgan Friedman
    Matt's Linkedin

    • 50 min
    • video
    That time when your client and his business partners just assumed that each of them know what to do to build a high-rise building (with Jeremy Streten)

    That time when your client and his business partners just assumed that each of them know what to do to build a high-rise building (with Jeremy Streten)

    In this episode, Jeremy Streten, a Lawyer and Business Coaching Support, shared a story of when a client from a construction company approached to get approval to build a 30-story high-rise building in Australia. 
    His client was thinking of selling the property and packaging it all up to a developer for building the high-rise. However, his business partner, an architect, was caught up in the thought that he was going to earn a lot from this and actually develop and build the property himself. A third investor, who had invested 10%, was supportive of selling the property to a reliable developer. 
    So, two of them were on the same page while the other one was thinking of something grand. The catch is that these three guys didn’t communicate their end goal for this. They just assumed that each of them knew what they would do. Worst of all, this misunderstanding ended up in court.
    As the episode ends, Jeremy shared valuable thoughts that are not only helpful in the legal profession but to other businesses as well. He also pointed out the little things we often overlook are essential in big decisions. 
    Morgan Friedman
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    • 58 min
    • video
    That time when your client was super happy to get a negative headline on UK’s biggest tabloid because to them, it’s still brand exposure (with Divya Patel)

    That time when your client was super happy to get a negative headline on UK’s biggest tabloid because to them, it’s still brand exposure (with Divya Patel)

    This was when she was just newly working for a brand, selling luxury watches for men. Divya Patel, a PPC Specialist, was handling the PPC service of the brand. 
    At that time, they were going to launch a YouTube campaign and she offered to create the ad assets for them since she’s been with the brand from the start. She was there to help the clients with the brand message, tone of voice, and everything about branding. 
    The client declined her offer and told her that they will sort the video out themselves so that they could focus on the campaign. Still, Divya and her team briefed the client on how the video should turn out. Divya and the team expected the video to be showcasing the watch that they’ll be launching.
    One day, as Divya walked into the office that day, her manager was upset and the team was circled around a computer. Turns out, the client posted the video on YouTube without telling the team. 
    To their dismay, the video was the complete opposite of what they expected and what was discussed in the briefing. Instead of men wearing and showcasing the watch, women in lingerie were there and the video didn’t focus on the watch, which was their product. 
    That’s not all. Divya Googled her client and she saw her client's name plastered on UK’s biggest tabloid negatively, something about how the video was degrading to women.
    Divya and the team were utterly disappointed and upset. They felt that all the work they’ve been putting into the brand was just thrown out the window. When Divya and the team approached their clients about it, they were really happy about it because they thought it was good publicity and a nice way to put their name out there. 
    Thankfully, Divya and the team were able to get through this issue. Watch the episode to learn more about how they resolved the problem and the steps they took moving forward.Morgan Friedman
    Divya's Linkedin
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    • 44 min
    • video
    That time when your client was upset about why she was in a small podcast, that only got 10,000 downloads for her episode (with Tom Schwab)

    That time when your client was upset about why she was in a small podcast, that only got 10,000 downloads for her episode (with Tom Schwab)

    In this episode, Tom Schwab of Interview Valet shares how trust and communication flow in the same river towards success. His story pointed out how important it is to educate clients, provide a timeline and establish clear solutions in risk analysis when working with clients.
    The story happened when Tom, a podcast marketing specialist, worked with a client with zero knowledge of how podcasts work. At first, the onboarding was great, the podcast recording was super smooth and it was a really abundant podcast session. 
    Five days later, he received a nasty and angry email from the client, all about how upset she was for not getting results in those five days. She also mentioned that she was with a radio show and had 4 million listens, which were not actually 4 million listens as she thought.
    She started to complain and demanded to have her money back. Tom didn’t want to ruin their reputation so he asked her to wait 10 days after the podcast to see the results.
    By the end of the episode, Morgan and Tom shared interesting conclusions about the hierarchy of communication and how it helped Tom to deal with the client. Watch the episode to learn more!
    Morgan Friedman
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    • 58 min
    • video
    That time when a customer frequently visits your workplace and uses the “quality control” card to eat free cupcake samples (with Braden Cadenelli)

    That time when a customer frequently visits your workplace and uses the “quality control” card to eat free cupcake samples (with Braden Cadenelli)

    customer approached him asking for a large order of cupcakes from them. The company accepted the offer and this customer frequently made visits to the company. 
    At this point, Braden already suspected that this could be a troublesome customer to deal with because of 2 major reasons.
    First, every time the customer comes in, she would taste test their products including the ones that are actual orders. It came to the point where they would make her separate samples and leave them somewhere else so she wouldn’t bother with their work.
    Second, when the deal was made and the company ordered ingredients for the production, the customer threw a tantrum saying the company ordered the wrong ingredient just because the packaging was different. It was the same ingredient made by the same manufacturer, just a different packaging because it was bought in bulk. 
    Fortunately, the company owners dealt with the situation professionally and have proceeded. The day of the production came, everything was super hectic and stressful. What’s worse is, the customer was there doing “quality control” eating 10 cupcakes in every batch they made. 
    As we reach the end of the episode, Braden shares some realities about such work environments and how important the principles of trust and leadership are in every industry. Let’s hear more of Braden’s story and learn a lot of interesting things in the food industry along the way!
    Morgan Friedman
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    • 1 hr 17 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
1 Rating

1 Rating

OfficialAnika ,

Great interview style and lessons for every service provider!

Morgan has a fun interview style. I like that he uses “client horror stories” to share things we all experience as marketing and communications professionals, and give actionable lessons and red flags to pay attention to when working with - or thinking about working with - clients.

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