22 min

How Climate Change is Impacting Our Oceans - Anne Merwin_Ocean Conservancy Climate Correction - A Climate Change Podcast

    • Earth Sciences

Anne Merwin, Vice President of Conservation at Ocean Conservancy discusses how climate change is impacting our oceans.
With over 15 years advocating for better management of our oceans, Merwin talks about the immediate action needing to happen for significant change. Merwin also shares the direct impact climate change has had in Florida, a state that many say is on the front lines of climate-change effects.
One way climate change has affected Florida is in its septic systems. In Miami Dade County, the septic systems require soil to filter and process waste. With rising water tables, it means there is not enough soil to separate waste. This could lead to massive impacts on the state and tourism economy.
By 2040, the sea level will rise 17 inches in southeast Florida. This equals up to 4.2 billion dollars of property value being lost. More than just a political issue, it’s economic-based, and disproportionately impacts poor communities and communities of color which represent a large portion of Florida.
The real changes are at the government level but can start on an individual level. Momentum building involves talking about the problems and climate changes within your own community which can lead to greater action. 
Action Agenda for a Blue-Green Future
Currents and Crossroads: A Vision for Florida’s Oceans and Coasts 
“Ocean to the Everglades” documentary series

Anne Merwin, Vice President of Conservation at Ocean Conservancy discusses how climate change is impacting our oceans.
With over 15 years advocating for better management of our oceans, Merwin talks about the immediate action needing to happen for significant change. Merwin also shares the direct impact climate change has had in Florida, a state that many say is on the front lines of climate-change effects.
One way climate change has affected Florida is in its septic systems. In Miami Dade County, the septic systems require soil to filter and process waste. With rising water tables, it means there is not enough soil to separate waste. This could lead to massive impacts on the state and tourism economy.
By 2040, the sea level will rise 17 inches in southeast Florida. This equals up to 4.2 billion dollars of property value being lost. More than just a political issue, it’s economic-based, and disproportionately impacts poor communities and communities of color which represent a large portion of Florida.
The real changes are at the government level but can start on an individual level. Momentum building involves talking about the problems and climate changes within your own community which can lead to greater action. 
Action Agenda for a Blue-Green Future
Currents and Crossroads: A Vision for Florida’s Oceans and Coasts 
“Ocean to the Everglades” documentary series

22 min