39 min

CM 102: Morten Hansen On Working Smarter Curious Minds: Innovation in Life and Work

What sets top workplace performers apart?



To answer this question, Morten Hansen, Professor at University of California, Berkeley, studied over 5,000 U.S. corporate employees for his book, Great at Work: How Top Performers Do Less, Work Better, and Achieve More. Through his research, he found that top performers engage in 7 key practices that explain 66 percent of the differences in their level of performance.



Co-author with Jim Collins of the highly acclaimed book, Great by Choice, Morten is also the author of the book, Collaboration, and he has been ranked one of the most influential global management thinkers by Thinkers50.



In this interview we discuss:



Why working longer hours is not enough to achieve high levels of performance

How seven work-smart practices can explain 66 percent of the differences between top performers and their peers

Why we need to do less and then obsess to produce exceptional work

How an obsession with sled dogs led one explorer to reach the South Pole before his highly competitive and well-resourced peer

Why Jiro, the famous sushi maker, is one of the best examples of someone who does less and obsesses his way to a Michelin star

The key question employees need to ask their bosses in order to do less and obsess: which of these projects is of the highest priority for achieving our goals?

How a lack of prioritization can be the linchpin to doing less and obsessing over it to provide key value

How a high school principal architected a work redesign that epitomizes what it means to start with delivering value and then determining goals

The value of redesigning our work without spending more or adding staff

Why our goals should emerge from the value we seek to deliver

How focus on fewer work projects allows you to ask deeper questions and provide more value

Why a focus on passion and purpose allows us to contribute more than passion alone

The fact that the goal of collaboration is better performance, not better collaboration

Why we need to avoid over collaborating and under collaborating and, instead, focus on disciplined collaboration to achieve our goals

How small changes can help us achieve big results, especially when it comes to focusing more, saying no to some things, setting better priorities, and collaborating more strategically



Links to Topics Mentioned in the Podcast



Robert Falcon Scott



Roald Amundsen



Jiro Dreams of Sushi



Psyched Up by Dan McGinn



a href="https://www.amazon.

What sets top workplace performers apart?



To answer this question, Morten Hansen, Professor at University of California, Berkeley, studied over 5,000 U.S. corporate employees for his book, Great at Work: How Top Performers Do Less, Work Better, and Achieve More. Through his research, he found that top performers engage in 7 key practices that explain 66 percent of the differences in their level of performance.



Co-author with Jim Collins of the highly acclaimed book, Great by Choice, Morten is also the author of the book, Collaboration, and he has been ranked one of the most influential global management thinkers by Thinkers50.



In this interview we discuss:



Why working longer hours is not enough to achieve high levels of performance

How seven work-smart practices can explain 66 percent of the differences between top performers and their peers

Why we need to do less and then obsess to produce exceptional work

How an obsession with sled dogs led one explorer to reach the South Pole before his highly competitive and well-resourced peer

Why Jiro, the famous sushi maker, is one of the best examples of someone who does less and obsesses his way to a Michelin star

The key question employees need to ask their bosses in order to do less and obsess: which of these projects is of the highest priority for achieving our goals?

How a lack of prioritization can be the linchpin to doing less and obsessing over it to provide key value

How a high school principal architected a work redesign that epitomizes what it means to start with delivering value and then determining goals

The value of redesigning our work without spending more or adding staff

Why our goals should emerge from the value we seek to deliver

How focus on fewer work projects allows you to ask deeper questions and provide more value

Why a focus on passion and purpose allows us to contribute more than passion alone

The fact that the goal of collaboration is better performance, not better collaboration

Why we need to avoid over collaborating and under collaborating and, instead, focus on disciplined collaboration to achieve our goals

How small changes can help us achieve big results, especially when it comes to focusing more, saying no to some things, setting better priorities, and collaborating more strategically



Links to Topics Mentioned in the Podcast



Robert Falcon Scott



Roald Amundsen



Jiro Dreams of Sushi



Psyched Up by Dan McGinn



a href="https://www.amazon.

39 min