100 episodes

Code Delicious with Dr. Mike breaks all the rules. Unabashedly confronting the questions, concerns and conundrums that continually confuse both public and experts alike; Dr. Mike takes us on a tasty trip of inquiry. Sometimes controversial, but always entertaining Dr. Mike covers the intersection of food and health as no one else can. As a professional chef, Dr. Mike takes us on a culinary tour de force. As a cardiologist and educator, Dr. Mike guides us through the changes to our food and food pathways over the last half century that have resulted in our modern epidemic of disability and disease. The result is a distillation of pure pleasure seasoned with life altering information.

Code Delicious with Dr. Mike RadioMD

    • Health & Fitness

Code Delicious with Dr. Mike breaks all the rules. Unabashedly confronting the questions, concerns and conundrums that continually confuse both public and experts alike; Dr. Mike takes us on a tasty trip of inquiry. Sometimes controversial, but always entertaining Dr. Mike covers the intersection of food and health as no one else can. As a professional chef, Dr. Mike takes us on a culinary tour de force. As a cardiologist and educator, Dr. Mike guides us through the changes to our food and food pathways over the last half century that have resulted in our modern epidemic of disability and disease. The result is a distillation of pure pleasure seasoned with life altering information.

    Culinary CPR: Duck Confit

    Culinary CPR: Duck Confit

    Chef Luca Paris joins Dr. Mike to discuss his latest savory recipe.In this segment, Chef Luca Paris joins Dr. Mike to discuss his latest creation for Culinary CPR: Duck Confit.  Get farm to table ingredients and recipes delivered right to your door every week with Sun Basket. Go to SunBasket.com/delicious to save $35 off of your first order. - sponsor Ingredients: 24 duck legs Aromatics for Confit: ½ bunch fresh thyme 5 shallots, cut in 1/4 “rings 10 bay leaves 20 cloves garlic 3 sprigs of sage Directions: Preheat oven to 220 degrees, In a large hotel pan place aromatics on the bottom. Place the duck legs intertwining, over the aromatics. Using all fat from the breakdown of the whole ducks, cover the duck legs completely. Cover with parchment paper, then foil tightly.  Cook for 4 hours, or until the meat easily breaks away from the bone. When cooled, take duck legs out of the fat, and strain fat. Place in ½ hotel pans with fat poured over the legs. Discard liquid, keep all fat for other uses. Sponsor: Get farm to table ingredients and recipes delivered right to your door every week with Sun Basket. Go to SunBasket.com/delicious to save $35 off of your first order.

    Fall in Love with Cooking: Kitchen Smarts

    Fall in Love with Cooking: Kitchen Smarts

    Make cooking enjoyable.Meal preparation used to take about seven hours. Innovations led to prepared, packaged foods. These time savers were embraced widely. Who wouldn’t want to cut down cooking time to a mere three hours from seven? It’s tricky to return to that age before convenience. Get farm to table ingredients and recipes delivered right to your door every week with Sun Basket. Go to SunBasket.com/delicious to save $35 off of your first order. - sponsor However, you can cook incredible meals from simple ingredients. Keep it simple and make as many of your meals as possible. Other cultures have interesting cooking techniques that you can use in your own kitchen. When food is scarce, innovations are made to get the most out of what is available. Fermentation, curing and preservation came out of a need to have food after the growing season. Cheap, abundant food becomes ancillary. The connection to food decentralizes its place in your life. Listen as Christopher Kimball joins Dr. Mike Fenster to share how to love the simple foods you create at home. Sponsor: Get farm to table ingredients and recipes delivered right to your door every week with Sun Basket. Go to SunBasket.com/delicious to save $35 off of your first order.

    Culinary CPR: Mediterranean Chicken Thighs

    Culinary CPR: Mediterranean Chicken Thighs

    Chef Luca Paris joins Dr. Mike to discuss his latest savory recipe.In this segment, Chef Luca Paris joins Dr. Mike to discuss his latest creation for Culinary CPR: Mediterranean Chicken Thighs.  Ingredients: 8 bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil12 garlic cloves 2 large yellow onions, thinly sliced (about 4 cups) 1 lemon, thinly sliced, seeds discarded 2 tablespoons fresh oregano leaves, plus more for garnish 1 cup mixed Greek olives Juice of 1 lemon Directions: Remove the chicken from the fridge 20 minutes before cooking to remove the chill. Preheat the oven to 350°. Season the chicken on both sides with salt and pepper. In a large ovenproof pan or Dutch oven large enough to hold all the thighs in a single layer, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the chicken, skin-side down, and sear until golden brown, 5 to 6 minutes. Add the garlic cloves to the pan and flip the thighs over. Cook until the garlic is fragrant and has gotten a little brown, 2 to 3 minutes. Remove the chicken and garlic from the pan and set aside. Add the onions, lemon slices and oregano, and season with salt and pepper. Cook until the onions have wilted and the brown bits on the bottom of the pan have loosened, 6 to 8 minutes. Nestle the thighs skin-side up in the onion mixture and add the garlic and the olives. Pour the lemon juice over the chicken and transfer the pan to the oven.  Bake for 40 to 50 minutes. Scatter fresh oregano leaves over the top and serve.

    Industrial Food & Chronic Illness in Children

    Industrial Food & Chronic Illness in Children

    Industrial food contributes to chronic illness in children. Find out how.A lot of chronic disease begins in childhood. An unhealthy gut microbiome contributes to susceptibility for chronic disease. What are we feeding our kids? Genetically modified foods and pesticides can alter cells and disrupt the gut. A non-industrial, organic-based diet can heal the gut. Regulatory agencies typically rely on manufacturers themselves to provide most of the data supporting safety of genetic modification. Not all foods are tested on people before they are taken to market. Genetic modification isn’t absolutely bad. Innovations can come from genetic modification. Listen as Dr. Vincanne Adams and Dr. Michelle Perro join Dr. Mike Fenster to discuss genetic modification and pesticide use impacting food in detail.

    Encore Episode: Culinary CPR: Mediterranean Style Red Snapper with Fennel

    Encore Episode: Culinary CPR: Mediterranean Style Red Snapper with Fennel

    Chef Luca Paris joins Dr. Mike to discuss his latest savory recipe.In this segment, Chef Luca Paris joins Dr. Mike to discuss his latest creation for Culinary CPR: Mediterranean Style Red Snapper with Fennel. Ingredients 1/2 teaspoon minced garlic 1/2 teaspoon lemon zest 1/2 teaspoon fresh thyme 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper 4 red snapper fillets (6 ounces each) 2 teaspoons olive oil, divided 1/2 medium sweet red pepper, julienned 3 green onions, chopped 1 garlic clove, minced 1/2 bulb of fennel diced fine 2 chopped roma tomatoes fresh 1/2 cup chopped Kalamata/Castelvetrano olives 1/4 cup minced chives Directions Combine the lemon zest, garlic, thyme and cayenne; rub over fillets. In a large nonstick skillet coated with cooking spray, cook fillets in 1 teaspoon oil over medium heat for 4-5 minutes on each side or until fish flakes easily with a fork. Remove and keep warm. In the same pan, sauté the red pepper and onions & fennel in remaining oil until crisp-tender. Add garlic; cook 1 minute longer. Stir in tomatoes. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer, uncovered, for 3 minutes or until liquid has evaporated. Serve with snapper. Sprinkle with olives and chives. Yield: 4 servings. Sponsor: Real Salt - Is Your Salt Real?

    Encore Episode: Cholesterol: Not Your Heart's Enemy

    Encore Episode: Cholesterol: Not Your Heart's Enemy

    Cholesterol isn't bad for your heart, contrary to what you may have heard.Doctors have gotten it wrong about cholesterol in the past. The guidelines have changed, but we still get stuck on old information. Why have you been told to avoid saturated fault? Because of cholesterol. You’ve been told cholesterol causes heart disease. Wrong. You need cholesterol for vitamin D production, sex hormones and brain health. This focus on cholesterol has lead to the over-prescription of statins. In many cases, you can improve heart health without these drugs. Statins are mildly anti-inflammatory but carry many side effects. Fish oil can reduce inflammation and has no negative side effects. Citrus bergamot lowers triglycerides and inflammation and raises HDL cholesterol (the "good" kind). Cholesterol is far more complicated than the two categories established decades ago. Particle testing is more reliable for getting an accurate picture of your own cholesterol. Of course, your cholesterol numbers won’t determine your risk for heart disease. It’s more important to reduce your inflammatory risk by improving your diet and helping your gut microbiome than to worry about cholesterol. Listen as Dr. Jonny Bowden joins Dr. Mike Fenster to preach the gospel of cholesterol. Sponsor: Real Salt - Is Your Salt Real?

Customer Reviews

Coach Denise ,

Great Interview!

Dr. Mike makes it fun to learn about health using food as a staple.

GJIVenice ,

Outstanding!

Cindy Lovelace gives an excellent interview about her rare cancer, neuroendocrine cancer.
Thank you, Dr. Mike for giving NETS the air time and awareness we need!

Sue26810 ,

Living with Neuroendocrine

A very insightful and personal look into Neuroendocrine! Engaging and candid. Great work!

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