13 episodes

Conversations on Public Safety: The Den channels the courageousness of lions to showcase that when experts in criminal justice bravely come together to question every aspect of the system, they have the power to reset and reshape the landscape of public safety.

Whether you're a veteran of criminal justice, a newcomer who wants to foster change for the next generation, or someone actively involved in the field grappling with the complexities of decision-making, you’re invited to the conversation.

Thought leaders Jessica Herbert, Rodney Monroe, Harold Medlock, and Steve Rickman form a panel with more than 100 years of combined experience in policing. They’re sharing their insights to help bridge the gap between communities and law enforcement with a mission to evolve practices, policies, training, and community relationships.

They cover topics such as police funding, the role of life experience in law enforcement, the falsehood of past recruiting, and much more. Join them as they challenge themselves – and you – to get introspective and collaborate on public safety solutions.

Learn more at analyticsbyidea.com.

Conversations on Public Safety: The Den IDEA Analytics

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 4 Ratings

Conversations on Public Safety: The Den channels the courageousness of lions to showcase that when experts in criminal justice bravely come together to question every aspect of the system, they have the power to reset and reshape the landscape of public safety.

Whether you're a veteran of criminal justice, a newcomer who wants to foster change for the next generation, or someone actively involved in the field grappling with the complexities of decision-making, you’re invited to the conversation.

Thought leaders Jessica Herbert, Rodney Monroe, Harold Medlock, and Steve Rickman form a panel with more than 100 years of combined experience in policing. They’re sharing their insights to help bridge the gap between communities and law enforcement with a mission to evolve practices, policies, training, and community relationships.

They cover topics such as police funding, the role of life experience in law enforcement, the falsehood of past recruiting, and much more. Join them as they challenge themselves – and you – to get introspective and collaborate on public safety solutions.

Learn more at analyticsbyidea.com.

    Change or No Change: Reflections on Crime Trends

    Change or No Change: Reflections on Crime Trends

    For today's conversation, Jessica introduces Dr. Jim Austin, the Director of Strategic Initiatives at JFA Institute, to The Den. Together, they discuss and reflect on his studies with observed and forecasted crime rates. The discussion highlights how policymakers and police leadership can analyze the intersection between criminal justice policies, socioeconomic factors, and long-term trends to understand and effectively address crime rates. 
    Throughout the episode, they discuss Dr. Austin's collaboration with Rick Rosenfeld on a group of reports commissioned by the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation. These reports created statistical models for forecasting US crime rates and examined potential policy shifts to reduce the US's high rate of incarceration. They discuss the details of the report and the significance it had on the field as a whole. Dr. Austin also explores the challenges in predicting crime shifts and then taking action to change them with factors including population, age, inflation, household dynamics, and politics. 

    Topics Covered:
    The typical analyses that Dr. Austin does for corrections and how they have supported crime reform changesBreaking down the importance of the forecasting reports Dr. Austin and Rick Rosenfeld collaborated onThe successful diversion of youth from the juvenile justice system How economic, demographic, and political factors relate to crime trends The decline in crime rates and the need to rethink police and policymaking staffing and performance over quantity Dr. Austin’s perspective on the future of successful long-term policy change 

    Resources:
    JFA Institute Harry Frank Guggenheim FoundationLink to reports

    Learn More:
    IDEA Analytics WebsiteIDEA Analytics LinkedIn

    • 39 min
    Defining Space and Place for Public Safety

    Defining Space and Place for Public Safety

    For today's conversation, Jessica welcomes Neil Hubbert to The Den, a research associate for IDEA analytics. Together, they discuss the complexities of creating boundaries for police districts or reporting areas through the lens of data analytics. Neil believes that a combination of experience-driven insights from officers and data-driven perspectives from analysts is essential for effective policing.
    Throughout the episode, they dive into the unique challenges that police agencies face when reevaluating their jurisdictions and present strategies for accurately representing the communities they serve within those boundaries. They emphasize the importance of understanding the historical context and patterns of police responses and explore how this information can guide division decisions. They also consider how departments can shift away from districts and focus on the data to regulate resources. 
    Topics Covered:
    Breaking down police beat management and why they should be tied to the personality of the community Challenges police departments face when considering changing their districts or reporting areasThe differences in policing within a city with irregularly shaped boundaries, like those on the East Coast How the history of police responses and patterns influence changing boundaries Why response time and availability of officers needs to be considered for structured fluidity The importance of understanding a community's definition of their area, including boundaries and neighborhoodsExamining the possibility of shifting away from districts to managing resources based on data 
    Resources:
    IDEA Analytics Online CoursesArcGIS Learning
    Learn More:
    IDEA Analytics WebsiteIDEA Analytics LinkedIn

    • 53 min
    Envisioning a New Service

    Envisioning a New Service

    In the field of law enforcement, the use of intentional language is crucial to convey values, build relationships within communities, and create clear divisions within police departments. In this episode, the panelists engage in a debate about reimagining police departments, focusing on their ideal structures, correct language when naming them, and their hierarchy. The conversation highlights the complexities and challenges of designing a modern, community-oriented law enforcement agency.
    Throughout the conversation, the panelists propose that the new agency should be community-centric and have dedicated units for addressing area-specific issues. The panelists emphasize the importance of prioritizing victim services rather than solely pursuing criminals and the need for appropriate language when interacting with families. Plus, they debate the number of divisions necessary to achieve the agency's goals.
    Topics Covered:
    The panel proposes a "Guardian Division" to replace patrol units, emphasizing community engagement and problem-solving The name and designations for investigations of crimes against victimsRenaming divisions to better align with civilian rolesHighlighting a division that includes support roles such as SWAT, bomb units, helicopters, and caninesThe need for a division dedicated to victim services, including victim advocates, outreach coordinators, and public health professionalsDebating the necessary amount of divisions and their structures The importance of professional standards, finance, and public informationThe challenges of defining departments 
    Learn More:
    IDEA Analytics WebsiteIDEA Analytics LinkedIn

    • 46 min
    Capacity and Leadership Part II

    Capacity and Leadership Part II

    In part II of the previous episode's discussion on policing capacity, today, the panel questions whether the traditional expectations of police officers, including being armed and having the power to detain, are appropriate for all aspects of their work. They explore the idea that sworn officers may not always be necessary to provide protection when responding to traffic accidents, mental health crises, overdose calls, etc. 
    Throughout the episode, the panel considers alternative solutions to these calls and discusses the potential need for new roles within police departments. With the evolving expectations of modern policing, they also explore the roles of victim advocates, forensic interviewers, crime scene technicians, school resource officers, and store security as well as the type of training these roles should undergo. 
    Topics Covered:
    The situations that will always need a police presence The importance of victim advocates in reducing investigators' workload Why professionalizing crime scene search with civilians improves its quality Understanding responsibilities of crime analysts and the resources they should have access toDebating if the police should be involved in school monitoring, traffic accidents, and suicide calls The training that is necessary to respond to the most high volume types of calls 
    Resources:
    Opinion survey (website)
    Learn More:
    IDEA Analytics WebsiteIDEA Analytics LinkedIn

    • 45 min
    Capacity and Leadership Part I

    Capacity and Leadership Part I

    Building on previous episodes that tackled crime, race, and capacity, today, the panel dives deeper into the capacity of leadership within public safety agencies. They explore innovative law enforcement approaches and challenge us to think differently about who and what public safety includes and does. 
    Throughout their conversation, they emphasize the need for leaders to embrace vulnerability and innovation. They share their insights on breaking away from traditional divisions and creating specialized units staffed by civilians. Plus, the panel debates the role of patrol divisions in law enforcement. They outline the potential benefits and concerns of redirecting certain responsibilities, such as traffic enforcement, to trained, non-sworn personnel. Also, they touch on the capability of banks and insurance companies to investigate financial crimes, and question the level of police involvement in such cases. 
    Topics Covered:
    The importance of critical thinking skills and taking calculated risks in leadership developmentCreating a unit of civilians for crime scene search and analysisMisconceptions surrounding the allocation of 70%-80% of police staff to the patrol division The use of non-sworn personnel for traffic enforcementPolice involvement in traffic accident investigationsQuestioning the need for police involvement in the investigations of financial crimes
    Learn More:
    IDEA Analytics Website for a list of police activities we evaluated for civilian v. sworn responsibility IDEA Analytics LinkedInLEMAS Data

    • 39 min
    The Role of Consultants and Community

    The Role of Consultants and Community

    During their conversations, the panel has questioned their role as consultants and the demands that come with it. They're called in to help agencies think differently and challenge norms, but often, they lack control over the implementation of the recommendations. Today, the panel reflects on the real value they bring to policing and how their analyses can truly make a difference. 
    Creating a lasting impact is extremely difficult, but of course, it's the goal. They discuss what consulting in policing should look like and what would happen if it didn't exist. Plus, they touch on key areas where change can occur, from the hiring process to training methods to the overall structure of police departments. With this episode, they hope to inspire ideas for reshaping the future of policing and leave you with a deeper understanding of the challenges and opportunities within the consulting field.
    Topics Covered:
    What criminal justice consulting should look like The changes needed to institutionalize the impact of consulting How police chiefs can position themselves as accessible to the communityThe challenges that persist in humanizing the community Why effective leadership is the first step in implementing the consultant’s recommendationsStrategies for consultants to optimize and deliver their messages 
    Learn More:
    IDEA Analytics Website IDEA Analytics LinkedInIADLEST Academy Innovations project

    • 31 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
4 Ratings

4 Ratings

Gretchen Kuhsel ,

A Courageous Exploration of Public Safety Reform

If you're looking for a podcast that not only discusses the pressing issues of our criminal justice system but also provides a platform for constructive change, this podcast is a must-listen. It's an eye-opening and inspiring journey into the heart of public safety reform. Kudos to Jessica Herbert, Rodney Monroe, Harold Medlock, and Steve Rickman for giving us a peek into how public safety thought leaders are questioning the status quo and demanding a safer future for all Americans.

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