26 min

Covid-19 & Alzheimer's & More..‪.‬ Fading Memories: Alzheimer's/Dementia Support

    • Health & Fitness

Dr. Snyder of the Alzheimer's Association spoke to me about long-term cognitive effects from Covid-19 and diversity issues in clinical trials.



 



I was honored to interview two renowned people from the Alzheimer's Association before the start of this year's International Conference. The AAIC is the largest and most influential international meeting dedicated to advancing dementia science. Each year, AAIC convenes the world's leading basic science and clinical researchers, next-generation investigators, clinicians, and the care research community to share research discoveries that'll lead to methods of prevention and treatment and improvements in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.



My second guest was Heather M. Snyder, Ph.D. Dr. Snyder is vice president, Medical & Scientific Relations at the Alzheimer's Association. In this role, she oversees Association initiatives that accelerate innovative Alzheimer's research and provide opportunities for the global dementia community to connect and collaborate.

Topics Discussed

Dr. Snyder is responsible for the progress the Association has made in Alzheimer's and dementia research funding. We discussed Covid-19s Association with long-term risk of cognitive dysfunction and the possibility of accelerating Alzheimer's symptoms. People with the virus experience short- and/or long-term neuropsychiatric symptoms, including loss of smell and taste and cognitive and attention deficits, known as "brain fog." For some, these neurological symptoms persist, and researchers are working to understand the mechanisms by which this brain dysfunction occurs and what that means for cognitive health long term.



Our second topic was the need for greater diversity in clinical trials. A significant hurdle in developing therapeutics and care models for Alzheimer's disease that work for people of all ethnic and racial backgrounds is recruiting and retaining traditionally underrepresented groups in clinical trials.



If you're looking to increase your awareness of the efforts on the part of the Alzheimer's Association, this is the episode to tune in and hear.



TRANSCRIPT



Related Episodes



A Ray of Hope? Stabilizing Cognitive Decline



 



NeuroReserve - Helping Our Brainspan Match our Lifespan



NeuroReserve - Helping Our Brainspan Match our Lifespan



 

Be sure to check out our website for more resources, partners, recipes, and more.  www.fadingmemoriespodcast.com

Join Fading Memories On Social Media!

If you've enjoyed this episode, please share this podcast with other caregivers!  You'll find us on social media at the following links.



Facebook    Instagram    Twitter



Subscribe to our YouTube channel.



There you can see me in "action" and watch the bonus videos I share.



Want to learn from Jennifer in person (or virtually)? Wherever you'd like a training session,

Dr. Snyder of the Alzheimer's Association spoke to me about long-term cognitive effects from Covid-19 and diversity issues in clinical trials.



 



I was honored to interview two renowned people from the Alzheimer's Association before the start of this year's International Conference. The AAIC is the largest and most influential international meeting dedicated to advancing dementia science. Each year, AAIC convenes the world's leading basic science and clinical researchers, next-generation investigators, clinicians, and the care research community to share research discoveries that'll lead to methods of prevention and treatment and improvements in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.



My second guest was Heather M. Snyder, Ph.D. Dr. Snyder is vice president, Medical & Scientific Relations at the Alzheimer's Association. In this role, she oversees Association initiatives that accelerate innovative Alzheimer's research and provide opportunities for the global dementia community to connect and collaborate.

Topics Discussed

Dr. Snyder is responsible for the progress the Association has made in Alzheimer's and dementia research funding. We discussed Covid-19s Association with long-term risk of cognitive dysfunction and the possibility of accelerating Alzheimer's symptoms. People with the virus experience short- and/or long-term neuropsychiatric symptoms, including loss of smell and taste and cognitive and attention deficits, known as "brain fog." For some, these neurological symptoms persist, and researchers are working to understand the mechanisms by which this brain dysfunction occurs and what that means for cognitive health long term.



Our second topic was the need for greater diversity in clinical trials. A significant hurdle in developing therapeutics and care models for Alzheimer's disease that work for people of all ethnic and racial backgrounds is recruiting and retaining traditionally underrepresented groups in clinical trials.



If you're looking to increase your awareness of the efforts on the part of the Alzheimer's Association, this is the episode to tune in and hear.



TRANSCRIPT



Related Episodes



A Ray of Hope? Stabilizing Cognitive Decline



 



NeuroReserve - Helping Our Brainspan Match our Lifespan



NeuroReserve - Helping Our Brainspan Match our Lifespan



 

Be sure to check out our website for more resources, partners, recipes, and more.  www.fadingmemoriespodcast.com

Join Fading Memories On Social Media!

If you've enjoyed this episode, please share this podcast with other caregivers!  You'll find us on social media at the following links.



Facebook    Instagram    Twitter



Subscribe to our YouTube channel.



There you can see me in "action" and watch the bonus videos I share.



Want to learn from Jennifer in person (or virtually)? Wherever you'd like a training session,

26 min

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