15 episodes

Established in 2004, CREATE is an interdisciplinary national research center based at the University of Southern California and funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The Center is focused on risk and economic analysis of the U.S. and comprises a team of experts from across the country, including partnerships with numerous universities and research institutions.

CREATE's mission is to improve our Nation's security through the development of advanced models and tools for the evaluation of the risks, costs and consequences of terrorism and to guide economically viable investments in homeland security.

CREATE: National Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events at US‪C‬ University of Southern California

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Established in 2004, CREATE is an interdisciplinary national research center based at the University of Southern California and funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The Center is focused on risk and economic analysis of the U.S. and comprises a team of experts from across the country, including partnerships with numerous universities and research institutions.

CREATE's mission is to improve our Nation's security through the development of advanced models and tools for the evaluation of the risks, costs and consequences of terrorism and to guide economically viable investments in homeland security.

    • video
    Anonymous Soldiers - The Struggle for Israel, 1917-1947

    Anonymous Soldiers - The Struggle for Israel, 1917-1947

    A landmark history of the battles between Jews, Arabs, and the British that led to the creation of Israel, based on newly available documents from the British, Israeli, and U.S. Archives. Anonymous Soldiers chronicles the British Mandate in Palestine, nearly three decades of growing unrest that culminated in British withdrawal and the U.N. resolution to create two separate states. Based on newly available documents, Anonymous Soldiers tells the story of how Britain, in the twilight of empire, struggled and ultimately failed to reconcile competing Arab and Jewish demands. Anonymous Soldiers depicts how the British were beaten by a determined terrorist campaign led by the "anonymous soldiers" of Irgun and Lehi thus demonstrating that terrorism is not always the failed strategy that is often claimed. Anonymous Soldiers thus provides a uniquely detailed and sustained account of one of the 20th Century's most consequential terrorist and counterterrorist campaigns, and also provides a definitive account of the struggle for Israel.

    Professor Bruce Hoffman has been studying terrorism and insurgency for nearly four decades. He is a tenured professor in Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service where he is also the Director of both the Center for Security Studies and of the Security Studies Program. In addition, Professor Hoffman is visiting Professor of Terrorism Studies at St Andrews University, Scotland. He previously held the Corporate Chair in Counterterrorism and Counterinsurgency at the RAND Corporation and was also Director of RAND's Washington, D.C. Office. Appointed by the U.S. Congress to serve as a commissioner on the Independent Commission to Review the FBI's Post-9/11 Response to Terrorism and Radicalization, Professor Hoffman was a lead author of the commission's final report. He was Scholar-in-Residence for Counterterrorism at the Central Intelligence Agency between 2004 and 2006; an adviser on counterterrorism to the Office of National Security Affairs, Coalition Provisional Authority, Baghdad, Iraq in 2004, and from 2004-2005 an adviser on counterinsurgency to the Strategy, Plans, and Analysis Office at Multi-National Forces-Iraq Headquarters, Baghdad. Professor Hoffman was also an adviser to the Iraq Study Group. He is the author of Inside Terrorism (2006). Professor Hoffman's most recent books are The Evolution of the Global Terrorist Threat: From 9/11 to Osama bin Laden's Death (2014), and Anonymous Soldiers: The Struggle for Israel, 1917-1947 (2015), which was awarded the Washington Institute for Near East Studies' Gold Medal for the best book on Middle Eastern politics, history and society published in 2015. Anonymous Soldiers was also named a best book of the year by both the St Louis Times-Disptach and the Kirkus Review and an "Editors' Choice" by the New York Times Book Review.

    The Safe Communities Institute (formerly DCI) has provided training to law enforcement professionals for more than six decades. The Safe Communities Institute engages research, interdisciplinary education and collaboration to advance sustainable "whole of community" public safety strategies, policies and programs.

    • 1 hr 6 min
    • video
    Unity of Effort in Homeland Security: Secretary Jeh Johnson

    Unity of Effort in Homeland Security: Secretary Jeh Johnson

    U.S. Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson discusses transparency, his commitment to risk-based strategy and the current state of the global terrorist threat at a talk hosted by the National Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events at USC.

    DHS is the third-largest department of the federal government with 240,000 staff members, a $60 billion budget and 22 components that include Customs and Border Protection, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Citizenship and Immigration Services, the Transportation Security Administration, Coast Guard and Secret Service.

    CREATE, which is jointly housed within the USC Price School of Public Policy and the USC Viterbi School of Engineering, was established in 2004 as the nation's first DHS Center of Excellence. CREATE evaluates the risks, costs and consequences of terrorism, providing analytical tools and guidance for its partner agencies.

    • 1 hr 16 min
    • video
    The Paris Massacre: What are the Implications for the US?

    The Paris Massacre: What are the Implications for the US?

    The Price Research Collaborative aims to foster critical discussion about both specific policy areas as well as the ways in which those policy areas are being implemented. This Price Research Center Collaboratives brings together the Bedrosian Center on Governance and CREATE Homeland Security Center.

    Join us for an important discussion about the Paris Massacre - the deadliest act of terrorism in France since 1961. Dr. Erroll Southers, Director of Transition and Research Deployment at the Department of Homeland Security National Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events (CREATE) talks with Dr. Bostic about extremism in Europe and in the Unites States. Dr. Southers' career has spanned all levels of law enforcement and he currently holds roles within the international counterterrorism and national security arena.

    • 1 hr 11 min
    • video
    "The Terrorist's Son, My Path To Peace" - Zak Ebrahim

    "The Terrorist's Son, My Path To Peace" - Zak Ebrahim

    Zak Ebrahim speaks as part of the CREATE Distinguished Speaker Series.

    On November 5th, 1990, when Zak Ebrahim was seven years old, his father assassinated Rabbi Meir Kahane, leader of the Jewish Defense League. Although initially acquitted of the murder, while serving time on assault and weapons charges, Ebrahim's father began planning attacks on a dozen New York City landmarks including tunnels, synagogues, and United Nations headquarters. Thankfully those plans were foiled by an FBI informant. Sadly, the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center was not. Ebrahim's father, El-Sayed Nosair would eventually be convicted for his involvement in the plot.

    As an adult, Ebrahim realized the only way to overcome the challenges of his past was to help others understand that hatred only produces more hate, but belief in non-violence heals. Those cycles of violence, no matter how old, do not have to continue forever.

    Ebrahim has twice spoken at TED events. The first event was at a talent search at TED@NYC in Oct 2013. "With quiet, mesmerizing sincerity, Zak Ebrahim told the story of being raised by an extremist father who would eventually be convicted in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing - and how he used his personal encounters with other faiths and cultures to overwrite that narrative of hatred and bigotry. "Violence is not inherent in any religion or race," he says. "The son does not have to follow the father." He dedicates his testimony to all victims of terrorism.'" -The Quirky Talks of Ted, TED NYC

    BIOGRAPHY: Zak Ebrahim was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on March 24, 1983, the son of an Egyptian industrial engineer and an American school teacher. When Ebrahim was seven, his father shot and killed the founder of the Jewish Defense League, Rabbi Meir Kahane. From behind bars his father, El-Sayyid Nosair, co-masterminded the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center. Ebrahim spent the rest of his childhood moving from city to city, hiding his identity from those who knew of his father. He now dedicates his life to speaking out against terrorism and spreading his message of peace and nonviolence.

    In 2013, he participated in TED's talent search in New York City, and was selected to speak at the main conference, TED2014, in Vancouver, BC. His TED talk was released on Sept 9, 2014, in conjunction with his TED Book, The Terrorist's Son: A Story of Choice.

    Established in 2004, CREATE is an interdisciplinary national research center based at the University of Southern California and funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The DHS Center of Excellence is focused on risk and economic analysis and comprises a team of experts from across the country, including partnerships with numerous universities and research institutions.

    • 54 min
    • video
    Digital Terrorism and Hate: Why the Bad Guys are Winning and What Twitter Should Be Doing About It

    Digital Terrorism and Hate: Why the Bad Guys are Winning and What Twitter Should Be Doing About It

    The CREATE Distinguished Speaker Series presents:
     
    Rabbi Abraham Cooper

    “Digital Terrorism and Hate: Why the Bad Guys are Winning and What Twitter Should Be Doing About It”

    For the last 20 years, The Simon Wiesenthal Center Digital Terrorism and Hate Project has been tracking how extremist groups leverage internet technologies to promote their hateful and violent agenda. The Wiesenthal Center does not see legislation or other government intervention as playing the primary role in addressing this disturbing trend, but rather companies like Facebook and Twitter. A PowerPoint overview of our findings that point to pivotal role that social networking should but be but are not effectively playing in addressing the growing crisis.
     
    Biography: Rabbi Abraham Cooper is the associate dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, a leading Jewish human rights organization with over 400,000 family members. He has been a longtime activist for Jewish and human rights’ causes on five continents. 
     
    Since 1977, Rabbi Cooper has overseen the Wiesenthal Center’s international social action agenda and worldwide promotion of tolerance education. He is widely recognized as a pioneer and international authority on issues related to Digital Hate and Terrorism. Rabbi Cooper has interfaced with religious and political leaders in Egypt, Sudan, Jordan, Indonesia, Thailand, Singapore, Myanmar, Japan, Philippines and India.  He has coordinated international conferences at UNESCO, Berlin, Geneva and multi-faith conferences on religion and terrorism in Bali and Mumbai. He has testified before the United Nations, US Senate, Japanese Diet, the French Parliament, and the OSCE.
     
    Rabbi Cooper is the project manager of the Center’s historical exhibition written by Professor Robert Wistrich entitled, People, Book, Land: The 3,500 Year Relationship of The Jewish People with The Holy Land, that opens in 2 weeks at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris.  
     
    His op-eds appear internationally in the secular and Jewish media.  Newsweek/Daily Beast lists Rabbi Cooper together with Rabbi Hier as #8 among the top 50 most influential Rabbis in the United States.
     
    He is a founding member of Israel’s Global Forum on anti-Semitism.
     
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    Established in 2004, CREATE is an interdisciplinary national research center based at the University of Southern California and funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The DHS Center of Excellence is focused on risk and economic analysis and comprises a team of experts from across the country, including partnerships with numerous universities and research institutions.

    www.usc.edu/create

    • 1 hr 25 min
    • video
    Eyes on Spies: Congress and the United States Intelligence Community

    Eyes on Spies: Congress and the United States Intelligence Community

    More than a decade after 9/11, the least reformed part of the US intelligence system is not the CIA or the FBI but Congress. This book examines why. Headlines have focused on the extent to which Bush administration officials withheld information from Congress about interrogations, wiretapping, and other controversial intelligence programs. But executive branch secrecy is not the entire story. In Eyes on Spies, Amy Zegart finds that many of Congress's oversight troubles lie with Congress -- and two institutional deficiencies in particular: limited expertise and weak budgetary power over the intelligence community. This is no accident. In both areas, electoral incentives and turf protection have led Congress to tie its own hands and block oversight reforms, even when the problems are known and the stakes are high. Examining more than 10,000 hearings over thirty years, Zegart finds that poor intelligence oversight crosses party lines, presidential administrations, individual congressional leaders, and eras. She concludes that the U.S. intelligence oversight system is well designed to serve the reelection interests of individual legislators and protect congressional committee power but poorly designed to serve the national interest.

    Biography: Amy Zegart is a Senior Fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution. She is also a faculty affiliate at Stanford's Center for International Security and Cooperation and a Professor of Political Economy at the Stanford Graduate School of Business (by courtesy), where she co-teaches a course on managing political risk with Condoleezza Rice. Previously, she was a Professor of Public Policy at UCLA's Luskin School of Public Affairs, worked at McKinsey & Company, and served on the NSC staff. National Journal featured Zegart as one of the ten most influential experts in intelligence reform. Her academic writing includes two award-winning books: Spying Blind (Princeton University Press, 2007), which examines intelligence adaptation failures before 9/11; and Flawed by Design (Stanford University Press, 1999), which chronicles the evolution of America's national security architecture. She is currently working on a popular book about intelligence in the post-9/11 world. Zegart writes a regular intelligence column at foreignpolicy.com and has published pieces in the Washington Post, New York Times, and Los Angeles Times. A former Fulbright Scholar, she received an A.B. in East Asian Studies from Harvard University and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science from Stanford University.

    • 56 min

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