100 episodes

Sometimes challenging, often disturbing, occasionally absurd, always timely: Criminal Injustice explores the most complex and urgent issues facing the U.S. criminal justice system in conversation with the field's most knowledgeable experts.

Professor David Harris and guests take on everything from racial bias to use of force... from surveillance technology to mass incarceration... and from police abuse and misconduct to the astonishing, frequently hilarious misdeeds of "Lawyers Behaving Badly."

It's not a lecture hall, and you don't need a law degree to keep up. But you'll walk away from each episode with a deeper, richer understanding of what's wrong with the criminal justice system – and how to fix it.

Criminal (In)justice David Harris

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.6, 193 Ratings

Sometimes challenging, often disturbing, occasionally absurd, always timely: Criminal Injustice explores the most complex and urgent issues facing the U.S. criminal justice system in conversation with the field's most knowledgeable experts.

Professor David Harris and guests take on everything from racial bias to use of force... from surveillance technology to mass incarceration... and from police abuse and misconduct to the astonishing, frequently hilarious misdeeds of "Lawyers Behaving Badly."

It's not a lecture hall, and you don't need a law degree to keep up. But you'll walk away from each episode with a deeper, richer understanding of what's wrong with the criminal justice system – and how to fix it.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
193 Ratings

193 Ratings

Buffalo Lawyer ,

July 30, 2019 jury exclusion/sunshine project

As a criminal lawyer in NY I was just catching up on my favorite podcast after a short federal trial in which our client was charged with retaliating against a witness who had testified against him in a prior drug trafficking trial. He posted the name of the police informants who had testified on his Facebook page. During jury selection the prosecutor used 4/6 preemptory challenges to remove African Americans from the panel. The race-neutral reason given was that each had a family member who had been convicted of a felony. It occurred to me if statistically African Americans are imprisoned in our country at a higher rate than other racial groups, the coordinate number of potential jurors who are related to someone who has been convicted of a crime will be proportionately higher for African American jurors. Thanks, as always, Professor Harris for a great podcast- and for the continuing legal education.

Markymark7174 ,

Great, but...

Fantastic podcast with great guests. It’s a must listen. I say this as a former broadcaster and now a lawyer, but I hope my experience as the former makes the following worth hearing out.
My only complaint is that David Harris (who asks great questions and otherwise a good host) occasionally slips into a delivery that resembles Eighties Radio Jock cheesy (“criminal iiiiiiin-justice”, “lawyerrrrs behaving (exaggerated rise and dip in voice) badleee” etc). When he reads scripts on his own in a studio it can sound so grating, over the top, and frankly a little unnecessary. It obscures what he is saying. Natural and under-stated is SO much better - as he is when interviewing or wrapping an interview up. So, please please I hope he tries to tone it down when there’s temptation to sound like a DJ. It comes across as so fake - which is likely an unintended consequence of this delivery style. No need for “so grateful for that day job...” either. Just say you’re a law professor and move along. It sounds like a humble boast (and therefore has its own conceit), which I bet is also unintentional.

Robert Sterbal ,

What an amazing podcast

Professor Harris I s someone I greatly look up to for is take on these issues. I so wish we could create a community to talk about them, particularly the mental health ones. I’m bipolar and autistic and I really treasure the efforts being made on my behalf! Thanks for meeting me David. It was a meeting I’ll never forget.

—Robert Sterbal, 412-977-3526 call/text

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