33 min

Daniel Palanker on breaking physics to found neurotech companies Neural Implant podcast - the people behind Brain-Machine Interface revolutions

    • Medicine

Dr Daniel Palanker is Professor of Opthamology at Stanford University. He has had many successful technologies spun off into companies or patents including those involving retinal prosthetics, optical imaging and spectroscopy, laser-tissue interactions, and retinal plasticity.
Top 3 Takeaways
"The [size] limitation for a retinal prosthesis is not in a fabrication side. The limitation is an interface with neurons"
Allergan acquired Oculeve but then didn't do much with it seemingly because they already had a more profitable drug on the market "Stanford is industry-friendly, encouraging commercialization, basically making things practical and useful and in Berkeley it's a communist mentality" 1:15 "You've worked on a railroad. Do you want to talk about this a little bit?"
2:00 "I introduced you a little bit, but do you want to describe yourself and your role?"
3:00 "The retinal prosthesis is a very fascinating technology. What's the advantage of this versus something else?"
7:15 "Tell me about the progress of this technology. Where did it start and how far has it progressed in the many years since you've been working on it"
14:00 "It seems there's a curse, on these vision prosthetics companies and the SecondSight and actually Pixium also has stuttered a little bit in the last year or so. Do you want to comment?"
19:30 "You mentioned this sub 40 micron photo detector, do you see a potential for, getting down to the five and the three micron size of that you had mentioned?"
22:45 "Did you want to talk about TrueTear and Oculeve a little bit?"
24:00 "If you suspect [a company buying your tech and shelving it] were to happen the then would you would you go through with that sale or would you continue to develop it yourself?"
25:15 "I was reading you have 70 patents and seven platform technologies... Is this a Stanford thing? Do you have access to great talent or are the projects you're working on especially good at spinning off these companies?"
27:15 "Is there anything else that you're excited about? Any other crazy physics rules that you're gonna be breaking?"
33:00 "Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you wanted to mention?"
 

Dr Daniel Palanker is Professor of Opthamology at Stanford University. He has had many successful technologies spun off into companies or patents including those involving retinal prosthetics, optical imaging and spectroscopy, laser-tissue interactions, and retinal plasticity.
Top 3 Takeaways
"The [size] limitation for a retinal prosthesis is not in a fabrication side. The limitation is an interface with neurons"
Allergan acquired Oculeve but then didn't do much with it seemingly because they already had a more profitable drug on the market "Stanford is industry-friendly, encouraging commercialization, basically making things practical and useful and in Berkeley it's a communist mentality" 1:15 "You've worked on a railroad. Do you want to talk about this a little bit?"
2:00 "I introduced you a little bit, but do you want to describe yourself and your role?"
3:00 "The retinal prosthesis is a very fascinating technology. What's the advantage of this versus something else?"
7:15 "Tell me about the progress of this technology. Where did it start and how far has it progressed in the many years since you've been working on it"
14:00 "It seems there's a curse, on these vision prosthetics companies and the SecondSight and actually Pixium also has stuttered a little bit in the last year or so. Do you want to comment?"
19:30 "You mentioned this sub 40 micron photo detector, do you see a potential for, getting down to the five and the three micron size of that you had mentioned?"
22:45 "Did you want to talk about TrueTear and Oculeve a little bit?"
24:00 "If you suspect [a company buying your tech and shelving it] were to happen the then would you would you go through with that sale or would you continue to develop it yourself?"
25:15 "I was reading you have 70 patents and seven platform technologies... Is this a Stanford thing? Do you have access to great talent or are the projects you're working on especially good at spinning off these companies?"
27:15 "Is there anything else that you're excited about? Any other crazy physics rules that you're gonna be breaking?"
33:00 "Is there anything that we didn't talk about that you wanted to mention?"
 

33 min