6 episodes

I am a Roman archaeologist. I live in Rome Italy. Every day I experience history. I excavate, I teach, I livestream. I was actually awarded Periscoper of the year this year at the Shorty Awards. I look forward to exploring history underneath the pavements of Rome, throughout Italy, and throughout the Mediterranean with you. Follow me on Twitter @DariusAryaDigs “717090”

Darius Arya Digs History Hit Network

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.6 • 34 Ratings

I am a Roman archaeologist. I live in Rome Italy. Every day I experience history. I excavate, I teach, I livestream. I was actually awarded Periscoper of the year this year at the Shorty Awards. I look forward to exploring history underneath the pavements of Rome, throughout Italy, and throughout the Mediterranean with you. Follow me on Twitter @DariusAryaDigs “717090”

    Another brick in the wall: preserving the Baths of Diocletian

    Another brick in the wall: preserving the Baths of Diocletian

    The Baths of Diocletian (Latin: Thermae Diocletiani, Italian: Terme di Diocleziano) were public baths in Rome, in what is now Italy. Named after emperor Diocletian and built from 298 to 306, they were the largest of the imperial baths. The project was originally commissioned by Maximian upon his return to Rome in the autumn of 298 and was continued after his and Diocletian's abdication under Constantius, father of Constantine.
     
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    • 26 min
    The Tiber

    The Tiber

    According to legend, the city of Rome was founded in 753 BC on the banks of the Tiber about 25 kilometres (16 mi) from the sea at Ostia. The island Isola Tiberina in the centre of Rome, between Trastevere and the ancient center, was the site of an important ancient ford and was later bridged. Legend says Rome's founders, the twin brothers Romulus and Remus, were abandoned on its waters, where they were rescued by the she-wolf, Lupa.

    The river marked the boundary between the lands of the Etruscans to the west, the Sabines to the east and the Latins to the south. Benito Mussolini, born in Romagna, adjusted the boundary between Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna, so that the springs of the Tiber would lie in Romagna.

    The Tiber was critically important to Roman trade and commerce, as ships could reach as far as 100 kilometres (60 mi) upriver; there is evidence that it was used to ship grain from the Val Teverina as long ago as the 5th century BC. It was later used to ship stone, timber and foodstuffs to Rome.

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    • 15 min
    Pantheon

    Pantheon

    The Pantheon from Greek Πάνθειον Pantheion meaning "[temple] of every god") is a former Roman temple, now a church, in Rome, Italy, on the site of an earlier temple commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the reign of Augustus (27 BC – 14 AD). The present building was completed by the emperor Hadrian and probably dedicated about 126 AD. He retained Agrippa's original inscription, which has confused its date of construction as the original Pantheon burnt down so it is not certain when the present one was built.

    The building is circular with a portico of large granite Corinthian columns (eight in the first rank and two groups of four behind) under a pediment. A rectangular vestibule links the porch to the rotunda, which is under a coffered concrete dome, with a central opening (oculus) to the sky. Almost two thousand years after it was built, the Pantheon's dome is still the world's largest unreinforced concrete dome. The height to the oculus and the diameter of the interior circle are the same, 142 feet (43 m).
    It is one of the best-preserved of all Ancient Roman buildings, in large part because it has been in continuous use throughout its history, and since the 7th century, the Pantheon has been used as a church dedicated to "St. Mary and the Martyrs" (Latin: Santa Maria ad Martyres) but informally known as "Santa Maria Rotonda". The square in front of the Pantheon is called Piazza della Rotonda. The Pantheon is a state property, ruled by Italy's Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities and Tourism through the Polo Museale del Lazio; in 2013 it was visited by over 6 million people.

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    • 25 min
    The Roman Forum

    The Roman Forum

    The Roman Forum, also known by its Latin name Forum Romanum (Italian: Foro Romano), is a rectangular forum (plaza) surrounded by the ruins of several important ancient government buildings at the centre of the city of Rome. Citizens of the ancient city referred to this space, originally a marketplace, as the Forum Magnum, or simply the Forum.

    For centuries the Forum was the centre of day-to-day life in Rome: the site of triumphal processions and elections; the venue for public speeches, criminal trials, and gladiatorial matches; and the nucleus of commercial affairs. Here statues and monuments commemorated the city's great men. The teeming heart of ancient Rome, it has been called the most celebrated meeting place in the world, and in all history. Located in the small valley between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, the Forum today is a sprawling ruin of architectural fragments and intermittent archaeological excavations attracting 4.5 million sightseers yearly.

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    • 25 min
    The Colosseum

    The Colosseum

    The Colosseum or Coliseum, also known as the Flavian Amphitheatre, is an oval amphitheatre in the centre of the city of Rome, Italy. Built of concrete and sand, it is the largest amphitheatre ever built. The Colosseum is situated just east of the Roman Forum. Construction began under the emperor Vespasian in AD 72, and was completed in AD 80 under his successor and heir Titus. Further modifications were made during the reign of Domitian (81–96). These three emperors are known as the Flavian dynasty, and the amphitheatre was named in Latin for its association with their family name (Flavius).

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    • 23 min
    Introduction

    Introduction

    I am a Roman archaeologist. I live in Rome Italy. Every day I experience history. I excavate, I teach, I livestream. I was actually awarded Periscoper of the year this year at the Shorty Awards. I look forward to exploring history underneath the pavements of Rome, throughout Italy, and throughout the Mediterranean with you. Follow me on Twitter @DariusAryaDigs

    Produced by @DanMorelle
     
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    • 1 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
34 Ratings

34 Ratings

Raven_Shoes ,

Good podcast

Interesting and well done. Seems to be over though. Wish there was more.

gr8erday ,

Phenomenal!

It is a privilege to have Darius Arya share his insight and knowledge of Ancient Rome. His on-site narratives give a “you are there” feel to these podcasts. I wish each of these were even longer. I love that Darius doesn’t dumb down his explanations - - he assumes the listener has some basic familiarity with the history of Rome. I really cannot imagine a better way to experience this incredible city and cannot wait for the next installments. Thank you, Darius!

TheHistoryFangirlPodcast ,

Love this one!

First heard of you from History Hits. Very excited about the show. Great topics so far!

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