8 episodes

Kevin Froleiks and Max Boyajian are both comedians living in New York City. Kevin loves The Doors. Max does not. Kevin is determined to protect The Doors from Max's palpable hatred for them. Join these two as they venture through the 6 canonical Doors albums: The Doors, Strange Days, Waiting for the Sun, The Soft Parade, Morrison Hotel, and L.A. Woman. Together they'll discuss the band's history, the personal drama surrounding Jim Morrison, and fun facts about each song.



Follow Kevin Froleiks on Twitter and Instagram @kevinfroleiks

Follow Max Boyajian on Twitter and Instagram @pukeandgarbage



kfcomedy.com

Defending The Doors Kevin Froleiks

    • Music
    • 4.0, 14 Ratings

Kevin Froleiks and Max Boyajian are both comedians living in New York City. Kevin loves The Doors. Max does not. Kevin is determined to protect The Doors from Max's palpable hatred for them. Join these two as they venture through the 6 canonical Doors albums: The Doors, Strange Days, Waiting for the Sun, The Soft Parade, Morrison Hotel, and L.A. Woman. Together they'll discuss the band's history, the personal drama surrounding Jim Morrison, and fun facts about each song.



Follow Kevin Froleiks on Twitter and Instagram @kevinfroleiks

Follow Max Boyajian on Twitter and Instagram @pukeandgarbage



kfcomedy.com

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5
14 Ratings
14 Ratings
SeedyRom ,

?

I can’t understand why one would spend the energy, use the electricity, or consume the oxygen to put out a podcast in this manner. I can understand a point/counterpoint based on actual research, but the negativity is infantile. One guy is somewhat informed, the other hates the Doors. Does this need to continue through several episodes? You can’t defend them to someone who doesn’t get it. If it’s supposed to pass for comedy or satire, it’s not quite there. Not to mention, could you pick a more overused, trite topic? Easy target. Everyone either loves or hates this band. This is not a personal attack, but a compassionate plea to perhaps look closely at this and ask, ‘How does this benefit the world?’ Or ‘is this the best and highest version of myself that I am presenting? ’. Paul A. Rothchild is hardly ‘Johnny Producer’ or whatever. Douglas Lubahn on bass guitar. Geez. I have never left a podcast review before, and most likely won’t again. Fellows, I really tried making it through the Strange Days episode. You barely skimmed wikipedia and sure expressed opinions. Convince me. Dig a little deeper. Or don’t.

The Dirty Doors ,

The Doors Deserve a Stronger Defense

I decided to give this podcast a listen because I am a HUGE Doors fan and a singer in a Doors tribute band with many friends who do not like The Doors. I was excited to hear someone “defending” The Doors. While the podcasters do engage in some interesting and spirited conversations regarding the band and their music, I was very disappointed in the weak “defense” from Kevin. He often caves to Max’s harsh critiques of the band and sometimes joins him in trashing some of The Doors’ best songs. For instance, they both claim that the debut album is weak. However, many critics and fans agree this is one of the best debut albums of all time. Rolling Stone ranked it number 42 on their list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

This isn’t to say The Doors don’t deserve some criticism. Waiting For The Sun and The Soft Parade are weak compared to the band's other four albums. And Morrison’s abilities as a poet are certainly open to debate.

When “defending” The Doors, more could have certainly been said about the talents of the musicians and the fact that they created one of the most unique sounds in the history of rock.

From The Doors’ website:
With an intoxicating, genre-blending sound, provocative and uncompromising songs, and the mesmerizing power of singer Jim Morrison’s poetry and presence, The Doors had a transformative impact not only on popular music but on popular culture.

The Doors’ arrival on the rock scene in 1967 marked not only the start of a string of hit singles and albums that would become stone classics, but also of something much bigger – a new and deeper relationship between creators and audience. Refusing to be mere entertainers, the Los Angeles quartet relentlessly challenged, confronted and inspired their fans, leaping headfirst into the heart of darkness while other bands warbled about peace and love. Though they’ve had scores of imitators, there’s never been another band quite like them. And 50 years after their debut album, The Doors’ music and legacy are more influential than ever before.

Here are a few things they got wrong in the podcast:

• The Doors didn’t get a record deal because of “The End.” Arthur Lee of the band Love recommended The Doors to Elektra Records president Jac Holzman. He saw the band and quickly recognized their talent and potential
• The Doors used outside bass players on all their albums, including the first one. I believe they used a total of 10 bass players over their six albums with Morrison.
• Robby Krieger wrote the lyrics to “You’re Lost Little Girl” and “Spanish Caravan”
• Kevin misunderstands and misquotes song lyrics multiple times in the podcast often changing their meanings completely.
• “Horse Latitudes” was a poem written by Jim Morrison in high school. According to legend, the term comes from ships sailing to the New World that would often become stalled for days or even weeks when they encountered areas of high pressure and calm winds. Many of these ships carried horses to the Americas as part of their cargo. Unable to sail and resupply due to lack of wind, crews often ran out of drinking water. To conserve scarce water, sailors on these ships would sometimes throw the horses they were transporting overboard. Thus, the phrase 'horse latitudes' was born. Morrison’s poem describes what happens as the horses are thrown overboard.
• The song “Strange Days” features one of the earliest known uses of a synthesizer on a rock recording.
• “Love Street” was not written about Jim’s first meeting with Pam. He wrote the song about a house they shared in Laurel Canyon after The Doors became successful. The meeting between Jim and Pam shown in the Oliver Stone film is completely fictional. They actually met at a club called the London Fog when The Doors were performing there in 1966.
• “We Could Be So Good Together” was originally recorded for the Strange Days album. It was not released until the Waiting For The Sun album because the band didn’t feel it fit in with the other songs on Strange Days.
• John Sebastian asked that his name be left off the credits of the Morrison Hotel album because he was under contract with another record company, not because he didn’t want to be associated with The Doors
• “Indian Summer” was originally recorded for The Doors’ first album. Morrison re-recorded the vocals for its release on Morrison Hotel. Also, the song has nothing to do with the incident mentioned in “Peace Frog” with the lyrics “Indians scattered on dawn’s highway bleeding…”
• “Strange Days,” “Moonlight Drive,” “My Eyes Have Seen You,” “I Can’t See Your Face In My Mind,” “Hello, I Love You,” “Summer’s Almost Gone,” “You Make Me Real” and “Indian Summer” were all songs written by Morrison before, but not included on, The Doors’ debut album. Morrison had a huge flash of creativity in the early days of the band. They would revisit this trove of songs over the years when they needed extra material for new albums.
• The Doors did bring in Jerry Scheff and Marc Benno for the recording of the L.A. Woman album to minimize the need for overdubs. However, about half the songs on the album do contain some overdubs.

MAndersonComedy ,

A friend to the podcast.

Kevin and Max really light my fire in a fun podcasty way. Excellent and quick to digest, I listened to them on a cartrip upstate. I forced everyone in the car to listen with me and they eventually made me change to the radio, but this is a very good podcast.

Top Podcasts In Music