44 episodes

The internet runs the world, and we talk with the brilliant people behind the scenes who make it happen. Through conversations with software vendors, developers, entrepreneurs, and activists, we’ll dive into the web apps they run and how they’ve enriched people’s lives. Discover something new to power up your next world-changing project, building your confidence to deploy on Fridays. Hosted by Platform.sh: the end-to-end web platform for teams. PS: We deploy on Fridays! Join the discussion by tagging #deployfriday

Deploy Friday: hot topics for cloud technologists and developers Platform.sh

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The internet runs the world, and we talk with the brilliant people behind the scenes who make it happen. Through conversations with software vendors, developers, entrepreneurs, and activists, we’ll dive into the web apps they run and how they’ve enriched people’s lives. Discover something new to power up your next world-changing project, building your confidence to deploy on Fridays. Hosted by Platform.sh: the end-to-end web platform for teams. PS: We deploy on Fridays! Join the discussion by tagging #deployfriday

    #45: The Next Generation Servlet Engine to your cloud application

    #45: The Next Generation Servlet Engine to your cloud application

    What is Jetty?
    Today, our guests share their extensive experience with Jetty. Greg Wilkins is the original software engineer for Jetty and Simone Bordet is a Jetty Committer. Jetty itself is an HTTP server and container for deploying Java servlets that run on HTTP, and it was also the first Java application server to be deployed as a clickable JAR file. Jetty started as a small open source project, and then moved to the Eclipse Foundation in 2009, where it still finds its home today.
    Greg adds, “Jetty is actually a lot more than an HTTP server. Over the years, the way we've developed the software is rather than being an application container, Jetty is a good software component first that can be used to make an application server, but it can also be used to make embedded applications and various other things.” 
    Who uses Jetty?
    Jetty has a 25-year history with clients big and small, commercial and open source, from SaaS products to PaaS services. As Simone puts it, “Jetty is deeply battle-tested.” What do clients like about Jetty? It is:
    Highly extensible, flexible, and pluggableHighly scalable for large loadsCan be scaled down for smaller deploymentsWhat’s ahead for Jetty?
    The new Jetty comes with significant improvements in performance and documentation, new features, and upgrades to Java 11 and Jakarta EE 9. Moving forward, Simone and Greg have plenty more they’d like to explore. “In the future, I'd like to see the standard support a good, reactive and/or asynchronous, scalable HTTP protocol and all the protocol features, and then have the application features layered on top of that,” says Greg. 
    After working on Jetty for so long, Greg says it is just as relevant as it ever was. “It is amazing to keep doing it and to see the way Jetty keeps developing. What happens above us and the way people use the web changes all the time, but they still need this HTTP protocol.” 
    Try out Jetty on Platform.sh: https://github.com/platformsh-templat... 
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    • 59 min
    #44: 97 Things Every Cloud Engineer Should Know

    #44: 97 Things Every Cloud Engineer Should Know

    “97 Things Every Cloud Engineer Should Know” is a book of collected wisdom by cloud engineering experts. Our two guests today, Michelle Brenner and Dan Moore, both contributed chapters, and we speak with them about the book and the state of cloud engineering in 2021.
    What is cloud engineering?
    With most companies having at least part of their infrastructure in the cloud, some form of cloud engineering knowledge is necessary. Dan says, “I would say that a cloud engineer is someone who works in the cloud — public or private. Most people are cloud engineers nowadays, whether they want to be or not.”
    Michelle expands on this definition. “A cloud engineer is anyone who wants their application not on their computer and more widely available. Whether it's at a company internally or externally for the whole world to try, it’s just kind of getting it out there and being more widely accessible.”
    Gain an edge with managed services 
    Dan and Michelle are big proponents of managed services, that is outsourcing tasks to people who know how to solve a given problem better than you do. They acknowledge that it’s a trade-off, but the reduced time-to-market and mental load can make it worthwhile.
    Dan says, “It's just so exciting to me, as a developer, to be able to let something that was previously a highly specialized job be taken care of by these specialists. I just don't have to worry about certain aspects and I can focus on building things that I only I could build.”
    Become a better engineer
    Dan and Michelle come from different backgrounds and levels of experience, but they both have great advice for engineers. Try to have a:
    15-minute rule (or 30) — Both Dan and Michelle have a time limit when it comes to solving problems, and after it expires, seek help from someone else.Beginner’s mindset — Learning how other people approach a problem can expand your perspective. A goal in mind — With so much technology out there, it’s easy to get overwhelmed, especially as a newbie. To avoid this, Michelle suggests always having a specific goal in mind. Increased communication — “Communication is so much more important to becoming a better developer, programmer, or software engineer than I thought it was when I was just starting out,” says Dan.Get your copy of 97 Things Every Cloud Engineer Should Know to learn more about modern cloud engineering from the experts.

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    • 57 min
    #43: Move your Java Microservices to the cloud with Payara

    #43: Move your Java Microservices to the cloud with Payara

    Our guests today Rudy de Busscher, on the Payara Sales team, and Fabio Andres Turizo, a Payara Engineer, speak with us about the importance of standards, what Jakarta EE offers developers, and using Payara. 
    Defining Payara
    Payara is a cloud-native, open source middleware platform that’s both Jakarta EE and MicroProfile compatible. It comes in two versions; community and enterprise. With the enterprise version, you get access to partners in the community, and very long-term support — 10 years! Payara supports on-premise, in the cloud, and hybrid Jakarta EE applications.
    Standards mean interoperability and sustainability
    Both Rudy and Fabio are big on standards, especially when it comes to microservices development. Fabio says, “Standards are important for multiple reasons — but I think the main one is variety. Where there's a body for standards, there's room for anyone to develop an implementation of that standard. And you as a developer have the option to choose what it is.”
    There may be many reasons you can’t continue using a specific technology. In those cases, Fabio says, “Following a set of standards guarantees that you can quickly migrate to another vendor, and that migration is easier because both vendors are following the same standard. The process becomes more pain-free.”
    Payara in the community
    Payara is a successor to the now-defunct Glassfish. But Payara has some things Glassfish did not, according to our guests:
    Higher code qualityConsistent bug fixes, updates, and improvementCompatibility with MicroProfile and Jakarta EETooling for use in any development environment More comprehensive documentation lies ahead!
    One of Payara's goals for 2021 is to make their documentation even more inclusive and welcoming. Fabio says, “One of the main plans for the year is to integrate everything — make it easily readable and more intuitive. If you're just starting out, or you’re a mid-level engineer trying to understand the nuances of how to operate Payara properly, then you will have all the tools you need in the documentation.”
    Try Payara on Platform.sh: https://platform.sh/marketplace/templ...
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    • 57 min
    #42: Subatomic Reactive Systems in cloud

    #42: Subatomic Reactive Systems in cloud

    Today we’ll be talking about reactive programming, Quarkus and Mutiny with our experts, Clement Escoffier and Julien Ponge, both Principal Software Engineers at Red Hat.
    Why use reactive programming
    Reactive programming differs from the “traditional” imperative paradigm. Reactive is a programming approach that centers on events (and reacting to them!). It helps build robust, efficient, concurrent applications and systems, and it lets you handle more load while using resources more efficiently. As Clement points out, reactive also takes a different approach to failures. “Failures are inevitable. So we need to embrace them and be able to handle them gracefully.” He says.
    So, why go reactive? Clement sums it up admirably. “With reactive, we are trying to build more responsive, efficient, robust, distributed systems. It’s about doing more with less.” 
    Mutiny simplifies the development of reactive applications
    Mutiny is a new reactive programming library built to bypass common issues with reactive programming. It is integrated — but not bound — into Quarkus, a  commonly used framework for building reactive applications. Mutiny helps developers by being:
    Event-drivenNavigableIntuitiveJulien adds that another of Mutiny’s strengths is that it’s built based on real-world scenarios. “We asked questions and got lots of feedback from real organizations on how Mutiny is going to be used.”
    Clement sums it up. “With Mutiny, what we really wanted to tackle is a better user experience, an effective way to write non-blocking code, and make composing asynchronous operations easy and understandable.”
    Get started with reactive programming
    Clement and Julien both recommend the Get Started Guides for Quarkus and Mutiny. Julien says, “The guides help explain the concepts and contain repositories you can follow along with.” Clement adds a caveat; “Don’t write reactive just to write it; only do it if you have a need.”
    But if you do need it, “For reactive programming, Quarkus and Mutiny are complete ecosystems that have everything you need.” Clement says.
    Get started with Quarkus on Platform.sh.
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    • 58 min
    #41: Empowering business automation with Quarkus

    #41: Empowering business automation with Quarkus

    Business automation has been used in other industries for years.  Now it’s available for software development. Our Red Hat guests Karina Varela and Donato Marrazzo tell us how business automation can help bridge the gap between business and technical teams.
    What is business automation?
    According to Red Hat, “Business automation is the alignment of business process management (BPM) and business rules management (BRM) with modern application development to meet changing market demands.” 
    Karina and Donato add their own definitions to the mix. Donato says, “Business automation is a bundle of two well-known technologies: one is the business process management (BPM) and the other one is digital management. When you contract these two, you are automating your business logic.” Karina adds, “When we are talking about automating business logic for decision processes, that’s business automation.”
    The Kogito framework
    Kogito, a cloud-native framework, is part of Red Hat’s business automation stack. “Kogito is this initiative that’s trying to modernize all our middleware, all of our processes, rules, and optimization, and make it even more lightweight, to make it run on top of a distributed environment instead of being in a monolith environment,” says Donato. Kogito appeals to developers for several reasons:
    Uses Quarkus to enable fast boot times and easier scaling Domain-specific flexibility Developer-centered experience with embeddable toolingMathematical optimization with OptaPlanner
    Karina and Donato tell us about a relative newcomer to the Red Hat business automation portfolio, OptaPlanner, which focuses on mathematical optimization. Some real-world use cases for OptaPlanner include:
    Assigning shifts at a busy hospitalConference scheduling Vehicle routing with planned stopsAny complex task with constraintsAs Donato says, “Finding the optimal solution is nearly impossible, but finding the near-optimal solution, that’s what OptaPlanner is for. It’s constraint solving with artificial intelligence.” Karina explains more on how OptaPlanner works and how to use it, “You have to design the model and the constraints, and the OptaPlanner engine is going to solve the problem for you. ”
    Try Quarkus on Platform.sh
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    • 56 min
    #40: Composer 2 and Packagist

    #40: Composer 2 and Packagist

    Composer 2.0
    Jordi Boggiano and Nils Aderman are the original authors of Composer, a near-universal package and dependency manager for PHP, and it just hit a major milestone: Composer 2.0. The two join us in this episode to give us the download on Composer 2 improvements and updates. 
    But first, Nils helpfully defines Composer for us. “Composer is a package manager, or as we sometimes refer to it, a dependency manager. It’s responsible for installing and managing your project’s different versions of dependent packages.”
    The Packagist-Composer relationship 
    How does Packagist tie into Composer? Nils explains, “Composer is the command-line tool, or potentially the code inside it, that can be used as a library for integration into some web servers. And Packagist is the server, the registry, the repository for packages that you can download.”
    Composer’s unique features and predictability 
    Composer is not the first or the most recent language package manager on the market, but it does some things really well that other packages don’t.
    Handles automatically releasing packages with tagsA predictable log file In addition to the log file, our guests say predictability is a very deliberate component of Composer. Nils says, “Overall, the tools behaving in as predictable a way as possible is something that we agree on. I don't want to have to sit there and think, “Why the hell did it do this? I don't understand.” And then I have to read the docs for a couple of hours just to understand what is going on.”
    Composer 2.0 improvements
    The most common issues in Composer 1 were memory and performance issues. The performance issue has definitely been resolved in Composer 2; as Jordi says, “In Composer 2, the performance is so much faster and uses so much less memory. The numbers vary a bit, but there is a huge reduction of runtime and memory usage.” 
    In addition to the performance overhaul, upgrading to Composer 2.0, also comes with:
    Internally refactored dependency updates and automatic installsError reporting improvementsTry Packagist on Platform.sh
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    Platform.sh is a robust, reliable hosting platform that gives development teams the tools to build and scale applications efficiently. Whether you run one or one thousand websites, you can focus on creating features and functionality with your favorite tech stack.

    • 54 min

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