90 episodes

Choose from dozens of illuminating conversations with some of the finest writers and thinkers in the world, interviewed over the past 25 years by Idaho Public Television host Marcia Franklin. Be sure to subscribe to receive the latest episodes!

Dialogue with Marcia Franklin Idaho Public Television

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Choose from dozens of illuminating conversations with some of the finest writers and thinkers in the world, interviewed over the past 25 years by Idaho Public Television host Marcia Franklin. Be sure to subscribe to receive the latest episodes!

    Author Eric Liu: Citizen Power

    Author Eric Liu: Citizen Power

    As the United States heads for what portends to be a raucous convention season, Dialogue host Marcia Franklin talks with Eric Liu, the founder of Citizen University in Seattle, about whether it’s even possible in a seemingly fractured society to have a civil discussion about politics. Liu, also the executive director of the Citizenship and American Identity Program at the Aspen Institute, is trying to reclaim civic education from the doldrums and encourage Americans to act on their rights. His TED Talk on the subject has more than a million and a half views.


    Franklin and Liu discuss the “tectonic” demographic shift in the country and what it potentially means for governing, how Americans from diverse backgrounds are still bound together by a common creed, and what he describes as a “third Reconstruction Period” in the United States. Liu, an attorney, is the author of more than a half-dozen books, including “Gardens of Democracy,” “Guiding Lights,” “The True Patriot,” and “The Accidental Asian.”


    Originally aired: 07/15/2016

    • 29 min
    Playwright Samuel Hunter, Part Two: The Creative Process

    Playwright Samuel Hunter, Part Two: The Creative Process

     



    Host Marcia Franklin continues her conversation with Idaho-born playwright Samuel Hunter, focusing on the craft of playwriting, some of the actors he admires, and a new project he's working on that's not for the stage.


    Hunter, a Moscow, ID native, is the recipient of a 2014 MacArthur Fellowship, known colloquially as the "Genius Grant." He also won an Obie Award in 2011.


    Originally Aired: 10/16/2015

    • 28 min
    Playwright Samuel Hunter, Part One: Finding Yourself as an Artist

    Playwright Samuel Hunter, Part One: Finding Yourself as an Artist

     



    He's only 34, but has already won some of the most prestigious awards for creativity in the country. On this episode of Dialogue, Marcia Franklin interviews playwright and Moscow, ID native Samuel Hunter. Hunter is the recipient of a 2014 MacArthur Fellowship, known colloquially as the "Genius Grant." He also won an Obie Award in 2011.


    Hunter talks about what it was like to win the MacArthur, and what he plans to do with the time and money it affords him to dedicate to his craft. He also discusses the evolution of his works, which have been performed all over the country, and the role of Idaho in his plays.


    Originally Aired: 10/09/2015

    • 29 min
    Historian Fredrik Logevall: Embers of War

    Historian Fredrik Logevall: Embers of War

     



    Marcia Franklin talks with Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and author Fredrik Logevall, Ph.D.
    about the antecedents to the Vietnam War.


    Logevall, the Laurence D. Belfer Professor of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School and a professor of history at Harvard College, won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in History for his book, "Embers of War." It examined France's colonial involvement in Vietnam, and how and why U.S. support of the French led to the Vietnam War.


    In its citation, the Pulitzer committee called the work a "balanced, deeply researched history of how, as French colonial rule faltered, a succession of American leaders moved step by step down a road toward full-blown war." The book also won the Francis Parkman Prize from the Society of American Historians.


    Franklin talks with Logevall about why he felt it was important for people to know about the pre-history of the Vietnam War, whether the war could have been avoided, and how the decisions made before and during the Vietnam War have affected our country's foreign policy since then.


    The author or editor of nine books, Professor Logevall previously taught at Cornell, where he was the director of the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies, and at the University of California Santa Barbara, where he co-founded the Center for Cold War Studies. He is the past president of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. Franklin spoke with him in Idaho Falls, where he gave the keynote speech at the Idaho Humanities Council's 2016 Eastern Idaho Distinguished Humanities Lecture.


    Originally Aired: 04/29/2016

    • 29 min
    Poet Richard Blanco: How to Love a Country

    Poet Richard Blanco: How to Love a Country

     



    Marcia Franklin talks with poet Richard Blanco, the first LatinX and gay inaugural poet. Blanco wrote a poem for President Obama's second inaugural and read it at the ceremony. He discusses the process of writing the inaugural poem, "One Today," how the piece reflected his life and his philosophy of writing, the themes of his work, and the power of poetry to change lives. Mr. Blanco was the keynote speaker at the Idaho Humanities Council's annual event in 2019.


    Originally aired: 12/20/19

    • 29 min
    Sister Helen Prejean: The Death Penalty

    Sister Helen Prejean: The Death Penalty

     



    Marcia Franklin talks with leading death penalty opponent Sister Helen Prejean, C.S.J. about her views, as well as the success of the book and film about her life, 'Dead Man Walking.' The two also discuss the potential future of the death penalty, women in the priesthood, and her next project.


    Originally aired: 05/13/98

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
2 Ratings

2 Ratings

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

Apple TV+ / Pineapple Street Studios
Crooked Media
iHeartPodcasts
This American Life
New York Times Opinion
Ben Hamm