6 episodes

Diane Ravitch is a Research Professor of Education at New York University and a historian of education. In addition, she is a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. She shares a blog called Bridging Differences with Deborah Meier, hosted by Education Week. She also blogs for Politico.com/arena and The Huffington Post. Diane often speaks on inequality in American education and the negative impact of federal legislation on students, teachers, and schools. During the Kennedy Center Partners in Education Annual Meeting in February 2012, Diane sat down with ARTSEDGE to talk about the arts, testing, and the roles of teachers and parents play in an arts-inclusive education.

Diane Ravitch on Arts Education ARTSEDGE: The Kennedy Center's Arts Education Network

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    • 4.1, 23 Ratings

Diane Ravitch is a Research Professor of Education at New York University and a historian of education. In addition, she is a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. She shares a blog called Bridging Differences with Deborah Meier, hosted by Education Week. She also blogs for Politico.com/arena and The Huffington Post. Diane often speaks on inequality in American education and the negative impact of federal legislation on students, teachers, and schools. During the Kennedy Center Partners in Education Annual Meeting in February 2012, Diane sat down with ARTSEDGE to talk about the arts, testing, and the roles of teachers and parents play in an arts-inclusive education.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
23 Ratings

23 Ratings

GmaEvie ,

30 Year Veteran Early Childhood Educator

Kudos to the common sense and clear approach to a valuable education that Professor Ravitch is promoting through her research, writing and lectures.

I have been an early childhood educator for nearly thirty years. I am currently employed by the New York City Department of Education and previously by the Archdiocese of New York. I have raised two children and seen them through successful college educations. I am also the proud grandmother of six. My husband and I were both students of public and private school education as were both our children. Our children later earned degrees from both private and public universities. All of my grandchildren are receiving an education that is highly infused with music and art: both at home and in school. All are in small class sizes with highly qualified teachers. All are performing well above grade expectations. Three live in Europe and three live in New York.

I completely agree with Diane Ravitch's research and conclusions regarding high stakes testing. I also know first hand the relationship between the arts in developing a totally educated and satisfied human being. I agree with the value of a highly developed early vocabulary (even in two languages) and integration of family in through arts education. Yes we need to recognize that politicians are "setting teachers up" for purposeless competition and blame, by demanding through NCLB & Race To The Top, a factory based "product" from our most precious natural resource: our children.

Being an early childhood teacher has been the greatest role of my life, second only to parenthood. The wonder, energy, ability, and potential in the young child is astounding. As an educator (and as a parent) I have been challenged to search for the best way to reach a child. Music and art are part of my "tool box". My reward comes with the "a -hah" moment that an experienced teacher knows so well.

What appalls me is that quality education is being sacrificed by test prep as early as kindergarten! Socialization and language development are crucial and fostered by the arts, and teachers are hard pressed to integrate these into the curriculum. With overcrowded classrooms and teacher's being judged on test data carrying the lion share of the proof of effective teaching / learning, the individual student's overall accomplishments are only truly known to the teachers and the families that appreciate the improvement in their children's lives.

I believe that the new common core standards adapted by most of the states are a step in the right direction and the public does not know or appreciate that teachers in many cases have been using precious energy writing the curriculum to support these new standards. As an educator, I have been evaluated my whole career and have welcomed professional development to improve my craft and so a fair evaluation system is not a threat to me so long as administrators are equally accountable for providing the professional environment and attitude that foster a risk free environment for both students and educators.

Lastly I totally agree with Professor Ravitch that teacher bashing has become a smokescreen for political agendas. In service and retired educators are constantly defending our students as well as ourselves. Parents are confused. The questions and comments I ask teacher bashers are: " how many teachers have you had in your lifetime: ten, twenty, thirty? Maybe not all memorable. Maybe some miracle workers. But where would you be without them?"

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