500 episodes

Weekly episodes digging up lost and forgotten 90s rock — in-depth album reviews, roundtable discussions, and artist interviews that reveal the unique story of the 90s.

Dig Me Out - The 90s rock podcast Dig Me Out

    • Music
    • 4.3 • 106 Ratings

Weekly episodes digging up lost and forgotten 90s rock — in-depth album reviews, roundtable discussions, and artist interviews that reveal the unique story of the 90s.

    #544: Throwing Copper by Live

    #544: Throwing Copper by Live

    Of all the bands to release big albums in 1994, there may be none bigger than Live's sophomore album Throwing Copper. In the studio heavyweights like Jerry Harrison (production), Lou Giordano (engineering), and Tom Lord-Alge (mixing) helmed the album that prepared the band for multiple radio singles, MTV hits, album sales around the globe. It also helped that they leaned into their successful influences, channeling U2, R.E.M., and Pearl Jam without coming across as imitators. Revisiting an album that was everywhere for over a year (it took fifty-two weeks to reach number one, the third-longest ever), digging into the lesser-known album tracks reveals a band that could embrace simplistic fun as easily as dour universalism.


     


    Songs in this Episode


    Intro - All Over You


    17:19 - Selling The Drama


    22:11 - Stage


    33:13 - Lightning Crashes


    44:19 - Waitress


    Outro - I Alone


     


    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.


    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 58 min
    #543:Golden Duck by Moler

    #543:Golden Duck by Moler

    With vocals equal part sneer and sweet, supported by a thick and fuzzy bass, Moler is a little pop, a little punk, slightly grunge, and very interesting on their lone album from 1997, Golden Duck. The three-piece is at no loss for volume, cranking out over a dozen two and a half to four-minute gems that have plenty of attitude and energy. Lead singer and bassist Helen Cattanach, along with Julien Poulson on guitar and Steven Boyle on the drums, are a tight unit that only falters when the melodies don't shine, which happens a few times on the back half of an otherwise engaging album.


     


    Songs on this Episode:


    Intro - Mustang Base


    11:35 - Pseudoephedrine


    23:06 - I Do, I Do


    31:39 - Warning Sign


    Outro - Red Light Disco


     


    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.


    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 48 min
    #542: Maximum Sincere by Big Heavy Stuff

    #542: Maximum Sincere by Big Heavy Stuff

    We've revisited many 90s rock bands from Australia of various types, but Big Heavy Stuff is the first to nail the post-hardcore sound made (underground) famous by bands in D.C., Kansas City, and Chicago. On 1997's Maximum Sincere, the band takes full advantage of the spacious room recording to showcase the drumming via slowed tempos and minimal arrangements that spark and blaze sonically at just the right times. There is enough melody and interesting guitar work to keep the album interesting, always a tricky proposition when slowing down, but that leads to some less than stellar material on the back half the overall strong album.


     


    Songs in this Episode:


    Intro - The Train Stops Here


    14:07 - Maximum Sincere


    25:31 - Cheating on a Dead Wife


    29:43 - May


    Outro - Big Mouth


     


    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.


    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 48 min
    #541: Soundgarden in the 80s

    #541: Soundgarden in the 80s

    Few bands are more rightly associated with the rise of alternative music from the underground to the mainstream than Soundgarden. Starting out in the mid 80s as a prototypical Seattle band backed by Sub Pop, produced by Jack Endino, and indebted to the heavy thud of 70s Black Sabbath combined with punk aggression, the original line-up quickly coalesced, releasing a slew of material in just three years. With Sub Pop in financial dire straits, the band recorded the debut album for SST, and showcased Chris Cornell's unique falsetto paired with the band's growing technical proficiency. A year later, they would end the decade on A&M records and release Louder Than Love, which further evolved the band into the metal sound that drove original bassist Hiro Yamamoto to quit, unhappy with the musical direction of the band. Within these recordings are the DNA that would lead to the breakthrough Badmotorfinger, and set the band up as the pre-eminent hard rock band of the 90s.


     


    Songs In This Episode:


    Intro - Hands All Over (from Louder Than Love)


    14:48 - Nothing To Say (from Screaming Life EP)


    32:07 - Flower (from Ultramega OK)


    42:26 - Head Injury (from Ultramega OK)


    50:46 - Ugly Truth (from Louder Than Love)


    Outro - I Awake (from Louder Than Love)


     


    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.


    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 1 hr 19 min
    #540: Spilt Milk by Jellyfish

    #540: Spilt Milk by Jellyfish

    For such a short career, Jellyfish managed to pack decades worth of musical ambition and melodic knowhow into just two studio albums. The comparisons are nothing new - The Beatles, Queen, The Beach Boys, Badfinger, Wings - but while plenty of bands have been tagged with the "power-pop" label over the years, Jellyfish occupy a unique space of both defining and transcending the label. On 1993's Spilt Milk, for as much Raspberries and Cheap Trick influence a listener can spot, the band is clearly going for a bigger, more grandiose sound that draws inspiration from the stage and screen.


     


    Songs In This Episode:


    Intro - Joining A Fan Club


    17:36 - All Is Forgiven


    28:13 - Brighter Day


    32:55 - Sebrina, Paste and Plato


    Outro - New Mistake


     


    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.


    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 50 min
    #539: Killjoy by Shihad

    #539: Killjoy by Shihad

    On their 1995 sophomore album Killjoy, New Zealand's Shihad might fool you with their opening Helmet-like salvo of "You Again" and "Gimme Gimme," two tracks of chugging down-tuned riffage with bass and kick locked-in. But this is not a Helmet clone, or a clone of any American post-punk band you might conjure, as the band shows off a variety of stylistic and rhythmic approaches that recall late 80s albums by The Cure. Somehow this band managed to slip under our radar in the mid-nineties, which is surprising considering the comparisons to bands such as Barkmarket and Jawbox.


     


    Songs In This Episode:


    Intro - You Again


    19:22 - Deb's Night Out


    26:55 - The Call


    34:34 - Bitter


    41:49 - Silvercup


    Outro - Gimme Gimme


     


    Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.


    Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

    • 59 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
106 Ratings

106 Ratings

j gentes ,

Come for the discussions about what you like, stay for what you can discover

Perfect length album discussions, many stellar interviews, lots of fun roundtables. The cohosts are genuinely nice and knowledgeable as heck without being showy or performatively cool. Only drawback is that you can spend hours going through their archives, selecting episodes, and finding new artists to check out (incl. predecessors of your faves)—and there is not enough time in the day to absorb all these finds without overwhelming your queue. I guess there are worse problems.

Mikey138 ,

Ehhhh

Retry awesome to listen to a couple of fellas with no prior knowledge about music, pedestrian taste, and no curiosity talk about albums.

evforija ,

So boring

I listened to one whole episode and like, how you can say so much nothing in so much time? I suppose that’s a hallmark of bad podcasts. Poorly researched, zero music theory, no mention of any controversies or anything salacious to keep your interest. The hosts speak s o o o o o s l o w l y it’s painful. It’s too bad cause their website, for some reason, is fantastically artistic and interesting. The design doesn’t carry over to the content.

Top Podcasts In Music

Listeners Also Subscribed To