16 episodes

Discussions of how to build your own gear for the recording studio and interviews with audio electronics experts.

DIY Recording Equipment Podcast Peterson Goodwyn

    • Leisure
    • 4.8 • 30 Ratings

Discussions of how to build your own gear for the recording studio and interviews with audio electronics experts.

    Designing Legendary Gear with Paul Wolff

    Designing Legendary Gear with Paul Wolff

    Paul Wolff has designed more legendary pieces of gear than most of us have used. In his years with API alone, Paul designed the 550B EQ, 512 and 3124 mic preamps, Legacy console, and 2500 compressor. He was recently honored by NAMM TEC hall of fame for inventing the Lunchbox and 500-series format, which he helped turned into a cottage industry. I was honored to have Paul on the podcast to discuss console design and how he's seen the industry change in the last 40 years. Just a few of the things we discussed: The origins of the 500-series How Steve Perry became the first customer of the Lunchbox The uphill battle to make gear that’s authentic to the API sound What happened in 1978 to change the sound of most audio equipment Paul's opinion that cloners "should be burned to death” Download the mp3 or subscribe via iTunes Some Notes on API Jargon As much as I try to keep our podcasts fairly jargon-free, I was guilty of using a lot of API model numbers without explanation this episode. These are: 550A: Late 60's, 3-band EQ 2520: The discrete operational amplifier (DOA, or "opamp") that's at the heart of most API designs 2488: Early 70's console 512: 500-series mic preamp designed by Paul 312: 60's mic preamp 3124: A 4-channel 312 designed by Paul 2503: The output transformer in most API gear 2500: Bus compressor designed by Paul  

    Analog Synth DIY with Abby Echiverri

    Analog Synth DIY with Abby Echiverri

    I've often fantasized about building a huge analog synth. But besides the obstacles of cost and not having a spare room in my house for it, I've always found the DIY synth world to be a bit intimidating. In this podcast, synth wizard Abby Echiverri walks me through the basics, such as: Is it feasible to build your own synth? How much should I budget? What are the basic modules I need to build? Abby is a composer, DJ, DIYer, and audio gear designer. I caught up with her when she was on the road as the synth/keyboard tech for Soulwax. Download the mp3 or subscribe via iTunes

    Chassis Design with Jon Erickson

    Chassis Design with Jon Erickson

    We audio nerds love to talk about particular parts and circuitry—transformers, op-amps, discrete vs integrated, passive vs active, etc—but we rarely discuss the biggest part and the one we actually interface with the most: the chassis. In this episode of our resurrected podcast, I talk to Jon Erickson about the ins and outs of chassis design and manufacturing. Jon Erickson has been involved with some of the most delicious-looking audio gear on the market: the A-Designs Pacifica preamp, JHS Pedals' line of 500-series modules, and his flagship Tonecraft 363 DI/preamp. Download the mp3 or subscribe via iTunes

    "Explain Like I'm 5": Why Is Pro Audio Gear So Expensive?

    "Explain Like I'm 5": Why Is Pro Audio Gear So Expensive?

    Sticker shock is a common malady in the recording world. It takes a lot of money to outfit and maintain a studio. But why? What are the factors that drive the price of professional recording gear? Why does gear cost so much more than the sum of its components? Are the prices justified, or is someone getting ripped off? In this month's podcast, Peterson and Chris discuss what goes into the cost of a piece of gear, and how you can short-circuit some of these costs by doing it yourself. Download the mp3 or subscribe via iTunes

    "Explain Like I'm 5": Filters

    "Explain Like I'm 5": Filters

    How do filters work? As audio engineers, we use filters every day. We're all intimately familiar with high-pass, low-pass, band-pass, shelf, etc. filters. But how do they actually work in analog gear? The basic operating principles of analog filters are actually very simple. In this quick (10 minute) podcast, Peterson and Chris explain the very basics of high-pass and low-pass filters so that any 5-year-old could understand. Download the mp3 or subscribe via iTunes View the circuits we discussed in the podcast on Upverter:

    “Explain Like I’m 5″: Audio Levels

    “Explain Like I’m 5″: Audio Levels

    What's the difference between "pro" and "consumer" line levels? Is it ok to plug an instrument into a line level input? What's the difference between peak and RMS levels? In the long-awaited return of our "Explain Like I'm 5" podcast series, Peterson and new DIYRE team member, Chris, explain the basics of audio levels. Download the mp3 or subscribe via iTunes Topics discussed: Can you damage equipment by plugging the wrong thing in? In analog audio Volume = Voltage The difference between peak and RMS volume RMS is a way of measuring AC as if it were DC The most common levels you'll encounter in the studio: +4dBu, pro line level (1.22V) -10dBV, consumer line level (.316V) Mic level Instrument level Tangent: why are microphone output levels so low? Subscribe to the DIYRE podcast

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
30 Ratings

30 Ratings

mastermindsofmusic ,

Lucky

Found his show by luck and lucky I am. Totally hooked. No BS just food for the mind and soul. Keep it up please.

Oliver Sli. ,

A little confusing.

For some of the beginning learners, maybe we aren’t you’re target audience but the first episode I heard of yours I didn’t understand anything you were talking about.

Deakin AC ,

Great find.

Keep the episodes coming.

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