91 episodes

What can sport teach us about life and how best to live it? Each week Simon Mundie sits down with an expert and uses sport to answer life’s big questions.

Don’t Tell Me The Score BBC

    • Sports
    • 4.9, 48 Ratings

What can sport teach us about life and how best to live it? Each week Simon Mundie sits down with an expert and uses sport to answer life’s big questions.

    Positivity: Frankie Dettori

    Positivity: Frankie Dettori

    The importance of a positive outlook in achieving success, with the legendary Italian jockey. Frankie Dettori says he aims to be in a positive frame of mind every time he leaves the house, which has contributed to his remarkable longevity. But Frankie also says it has a tangible effect on his horses – they can sense the frame of mind he is in and react accordingly. That may well explain how he managed famously to win all seven races in one day at Ascot in 1996, when he had something akin to a mystical experience on what was his final ride of the day.

    In this episode, Frankie also explains why he isn't someone to have a "five year plan" – he explores the differences between the Italian and British outlooks on life; he looks ahead to riding the favourite at the Investec Derby, and talks about the plane crash he was in 20 years ago – when he was convinced he was going to die – and how it has affected his outlook on life ever since.

    • 47 min
    Deliberate practice: Anders Ericsson

    Deliberate practice: Anders Ericsson

    How to get better at almost anything by practising like an expert. Anders Ericsson, who sadly died recently, was Professor of Psychology at Florida State University. Anders spent decades studying elite performers across a number of fields including sport, music and medicine, and it was his research that led to the popular "10,000-hour rule" written about by Malcolm Gladwell and others.

    Anders explains that just clocking up 10,000 hours of regular practice won't make you an expert; the key is to spend your time in deliberate practice. It is a purposeful and systematic approach that requires you to be focused, push past your comfort zone, seek feedback and make sure you prioritise rest, as Anders explains in this episode. As ever, thoughts and questions @simonmundie

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Power of emotion: Mel Marshall

    Power of emotion: Mel Marshall

    Using emotion, vulnerability and connection to fuel powerful performances. Mel Marshall is a former world number one swimmer turned coach. She’s been coaching Adam Peaty since he was 14 and Adam is one of the greatest swimmers of all time (2016 Olympic champion, eight-time world champion and world record holder in the 50 and 100 metre breastroke). Adam says Mel developed him into the man he is today.

    Mel is all about relationships and talks about the love she feels for the people she works with and the swimmers she coaches. It is that emotion and connection that can help people find an extra 10%. Having honest and vulnerable conversations can actually release feel-good hormones that can help people perform better. That human touch, that is easy to overlook and undervalue, really can make a huge difference.

    Mel also talks about managing down, sideways and up. She shares some gems about managing up in particular, using what she calls her 'invisible leadership skills'. She talks about the value of working out what your work capacity is and sticking to that, and the importance of finding balance.

    Mel and Simon also discuss the power of belief, that intangible yet crucial quality. Also the difference between personality and character and the similarity between Adam Peaty and Michael Jordan.

    • 52 min
    Work ethic: David Coulthard

    Work ethic: David Coulthard

    Developing a work ethic and being efficient with F1 legend David Coulthard. David spent 15 seasons in Formula One, taking 13 Grand Prix victories and 62 podium finishes. After retiring, he deftly transitioned into being a commentator, pundit and entrepreneur. He is undoubtedly a grafter, and that work ethic is something that was instilled in him by his upbringing. In this episode David explains what he learnt from his hard working parents, and how he's taken that forward into his own life and passed it on to his son and step-daughter. He talks about prioritising and being efficient, the importance of routine to let your mind de-clutter and the value of the F1 honesty and responsibility culture – and what other businesses and organisations could learn from it. He emphasises the importance of making things happen – and not waiting for them to happen to you – and explains why multi-tasking is generally a bad idea, as well as the art of conserving energy. David also shares what he learnt from his brush with death in a plane crash in 2000, as well as the lessons he took from observing the late great Ayrton Senna. Get in touch on twitter @simonmundie.

    • 1 hr 10 min
    Managing people: Sam Allardyce

    Managing people: Sam Allardyce

    Getting the best out of people by treating them as individuals with the former England manager, Sam Allardyce.

    Sam has had a long and successful career in football, first as a player and then as a manager. Many players who were managed by Sam have spoken fondly of his ability to create an enjoyable environment for them, most notably the team he created at Bolton. He surprised many people by luring World Cup winners and genuine megastars to the club in the early 2000s. Sam was ahead of his time at Bolton, using sports scientists, analysts and psychologists well before that became the norm elsewhere.

    When it comes to managing people, Sam talks about the importance of getting in front of people where possible, and not simply relying on data and second hand information. He talks about the danger of being labelled, something he felt happened to him early in his managerial career, as well as his longstanding meditation habit, playing pranks on Sir Alex Ferguson and dealing with the emotional impact of losing the England job after just one match, following a newspaper sting.

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Mental Health: Sir John Kirwan

    Mental Health: Sir John Kirwan

    How to go from surviving to thriving with All Black legend and mental health advocate Sir John Kirwan. John is one of the greatest rugby union players of all time, but it's his work around mental health that led to him being knighted. When he was one of the most high profile players in the world, John had a serious mental health crisis. Thoughts of suicide eventually prompted to him to seek help, which sent him on a wellness journey that led him to being one of the faces of the mental health campaign in his home country, and it's there that he's now launched the free Mentemia app to help people cope during the coronavirus crisis.

    In this episode, John shares lessons from reaching the very top of his sport, including setting a goal and 'paying the price' to reach it. He talks about the beauty of the Italian culture and what we can all learn from the way they value connection and 'breaking bread'. And he shares his daily mental health plan, which includes taking time to unplug your brain several times throughout the day just as you would turn your computer off and on again when it starts playing up. John also explains why he is someone who needs 'active relaxation', as opposed to a tool like like meditation, and he shares wisdom on how you can discover pursuits that can help calm your inner monkey down. And John and Simon touch on ways to get feel-good hormones going round your body, including taking time to connect as well as doing random acts of kindness. As ever, please get in touch @simonmundie

    • 1 hr 1 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
48 Ratings

48 Ratings

Unicornseeker555 ,

Absolutely Love it

I ABSOLUTELY love Simon and his guests! Every single time I am inspired and amazed by their messeges and words. It makes my daily drive something to look forward to and feel like I’m flying on a unicorn instead of waiting in traffic. I can’t wait to finish all the podcast and relisten again and again.

Fizz Pittsburgh ,

One of my favourite podcasts

Although there is an occasional dud, most of Simon’s interviews are insightful and reveal an unfamiliar aspect of the subject.

PropsNYC ,

Never stop learning!

I work in the Human Performance space and so I’m lucky to be surrounded by world experts on every manner of topics related to unleashing potential. That said, Simon’s podcast is phenomenal and his style of interview, his empathy, interest and continual filtering to ensure there are useable insights for everyone, is truly world class. Thank you!!

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