1 hr 4 min

Dr. Jed Fahey and Sharon Cryan | Ultra-processed Foods and Living Your Youngest You Vitamin & Me

    • Medicine

Processed food intake has been on the rise since the industrial revolution. Today, more than 70% of available food in the US is processed. Even with the best of intentions – world hunger, stunting, blindness – food manufacturers got one major thing wrong. Most ultra-processed food is devoid of essential nutrients – vitamins, minerals, fiber, and phytonutrients – necessary for a healthy life. More than 90% of the American population is deficient in at least one essential nutrient. Malnutrition in a developing nation may lead to stunting or death because of a lack of food access and acute healthcare. But in the United States, in most cases, we have access to food and acute care facilities. Instead, we see malnutrition play out as chronic diseases. This touches every phase of the lifespan – including pregnancy – and leads to decades of reduced quality of life and increased financial burden that affects generations. It comes as no surprise that chronic diseases continue to rise. And this generation is now facing them much earlier in life, even at the peak of child-bearing years. This is why the concept of the first 1000 days – from conception to 2 years of life – is so important. We have to get it right.
Even though I approach this work as a nutritional scientist, I’m also a mother. I know that sometimes it’s hard to meet the demands of life and feed my family fresh food every day. I’m forced to make a choice from what is available – I’m sure you can relate. But parents, like you and me, are demanding better. Consumers know there is a better option. And now industry is starting to listen.
Sharon Cryan, an attorney turned founder, cares deeply about the effect of highly processed foods and their link to chronic disease. She is passionate about addressing the major flaws within the food industry and set out to make a change through innovation and transparency. Her company, Foodnerd, develops products that are formulated and produced with novel processing techniques that maintain the nutrients found in whole foods and supports gut health. Sharon is joining us today to chat about the future of convenient and healthy eating, alongside one our favorites, Dr. Jed Fahey. If you listen to our show, you’ll know that Jed was here last year chatting about his work on sulforaphane and plant-based nutrition. And he’s here again to chat with YOU about science & ultraprocessed foods.
Jed’s socials:
@jedosan
Jed Fahey
Sharon’s socials:
@foodnerdinc
FoodNerdInc
Vitamin & Me Socials:
@vitaminandme
@jessicakhouston
Vitamin & Me
EatClean30: And Evidenced-based Guide to Eating Well

Processed food intake has been on the rise since the industrial revolution. Today, more than 70% of available food in the US is processed. Even with the best of intentions – world hunger, stunting, blindness – food manufacturers got one major thing wrong. Most ultra-processed food is devoid of essential nutrients – vitamins, minerals, fiber, and phytonutrients – necessary for a healthy life. More than 90% of the American population is deficient in at least one essential nutrient. Malnutrition in a developing nation may lead to stunting or death because of a lack of food access and acute healthcare. But in the United States, in most cases, we have access to food and acute care facilities. Instead, we see malnutrition play out as chronic diseases. This touches every phase of the lifespan – including pregnancy – and leads to decades of reduced quality of life and increased financial burden that affects generations. It comes as no surprise that chronic diseases continue to rise. And this generation is now facing them much earlier in life, even at the peak of child-bearing years. This is why the concept of the first 1000 days – from conception to 2 years of life – is so important. We have to get it right.
Even though I approach this work as a nutritional scientist, I’m also a mother. I know that sometimes it’s hard to meet the demands of life and feed my family fresh food every day. I’m forced to make a choice from what is available – I’m sure you can relate. But parents, like you and me, are demanding better. Consumers know there is a better option. And now industry is starting to listen.
Sharon Cryan, an attorney turned founder, cares deeply about the effect of highly processed foods and their link to chronic disease. She is passionate about addressing the major flaws within the food industry and set out to make a change through innovation and transparency. Her company, Foodnerd, develops products that are formulated and produced with novel processing techniques that maintain the nutrients found in whole foods and supports gut health. Sharon is joining us today to chat about the future of convenient and healthy eating, alongside one our favorites, Dr. Jed Fahey. If you listen to our show, you’ll know that Jed was here last year chatting about his work on sulforaphane and plant-based nutrition. And he’s here again to chat with YOU about science & ultraprocessed foods.
Jed’s socials:
@jedosan
Jed Fahey
Sharon’s socials:
@foodnerdinc
FoodNerdInc
Vitamin & Me Socials:
@vitaminandme
@jessicakhouston
Vitamin & Me
EatClean30: And Evidenced-based Guide to Eating Well

1 hr 4 min