100 episodes

Corporate culture geek S. Chris Edmonds helps leaders create purposeful, positive, productive work environments with an organizational constitution.

Driving Results Through Culture S. Chris Edmonds

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Corporate culture geek S. Chris Edmonds helps leaders create purposeful, positive, productive work environments with an organizational constitution.

    Culture Leadership Charge, Episode 104 - "No one talks about Bruno."

    Culture Leadership Charge, Episode 104 - "No one talks about Bruno."

    About that title? We’ll get to Bruno in a minute.
    The foundational principle of our book, Good Comes First, is that today’s leaders must make RESPECT as important as RESULTS, every day.
    My colleague and co-author, Mark Babbitt, and I were keynoting a conference. In our presentation, we share this fundamental model - the Performance-Values Matrix.
    Once you formalize performance expectations AND values expectations, players categorize themselves into one of four quadrants.
    The upper right is where you want all players to operate. You want them to exceed performance expectations while demonstrating your positive values. You must recognize and retain folks in that quadrant.
    The bottom left is not a good place for people to operate. They’re missing performance standards and don’t model your values. You must give them a chance to align to both. If they do, great. If they don’t, they can’t stay in your organization. You must lovingly set them free.
    The bottom right is a slightly better place for people to be. These folks are role models of your positive values - but they’re unable to consistently deliver required results. You must guide them to contribution - through training, coaching, or even finding a role where their skills match needed results. If they boost contribution, great. If they don’t, they can’t stay in your organization. You must lovingly set them free.
    The upper left brings interesting challenges. Folks in this quadrant deliver the results you want - but they do so while treating others disrespectfully.
    This brings us back to Bruno. In our keynote, we asked learning partners to discuss the impact of players operating in any quadrant except the upper right. A few minutes into the pairs’ conversations, a loud voice said, “Nobody talks about Bruno.”
    We asked what this woman meant. She described a top salesperson in their company who always beats sales targets - and always bullies those around him. For years staff have complained about Bruno’s treatment of others - sexist and racist comments, yelling if he doesn’t get his way, etc. Yet, senior leaders don’t do anything. They don’t want to lose the profits this guy generates.
    So, nobody talks to Bruno - and nobody talks about Bruno.
    An uncompromising work culture is built and sustained by positive behaviors modeled and rewarded. An uncompromising culture is destroyed by the demeaning, discounting, and dismissive behaviors tolerated - of anyone, by anyone.
    For players who operate in the upper left quadrant, you must mentor them to alignment, to deliver needed results while treating others respectfully. If they do, great. If not, you must lovingly set them free.
    Only then will you sustain a purposeful, positive, productive work culture, every day.
    This is episode was originally published on https://DrivingResultsThroughCulture.com on June 12, 2022.

    • 4 min
    Culture Leadership Charge - Episode 103: Find Your Culture "Sweet Spot"

    Culture Leadership Charge - Episode 103: Find Your Culture "Sweet Spot"

    Most of you know me as a speaker, writer, and consultant. Some of you know that I’m a working musician on the side. I grew up in California in the ’50’s and ’60’s. I watched great artists playing cool guitars - and I fell in love with stringed instruments. I’ve been collecting them since college.
    To stay healthy, stringed instruments need one thing every minute of every day: proper humidity.
    These instruments are made of wood - wood that reacts to the environment they’re in. Acoustic instruments have a sweet spot: they are healthiest when they exist in an environment with 45-55% humidity.
    If the air is too dry? The wood will shrink, split and crack. String tension will likely cause a significant break. If the air is too wet? The glue holding the instrument together will fail - and the string tension will cause an impressive implosion!
    In the California coastal towns where we lived for 30 years, the humidity was perfect for those instruments.
    In the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, that’s not the case. It’s dry here - consistently in the 20% range. To boost humidity, we use three humidifiers. They keep the humidity at 40—45%. We refill them with water 2-3 times a day. My Taylor guitars have a cool sensor that sends their current humidity to a smartphone app. That app pings me if the humidity gets too low or too high.
    Just like guitars, the employees of your organization operate most effectively when their environment - the work culture they live in - provides what they need to thrive: respect and validation for their ideas, efforts, and contributions, every day.
    Respect and validation require a leader to notice and then communicate appreciation for team members’ ideas, efforts, and contributions.
    Here’s the secret: employees have a sweet spot, too. The most positive impact of respect and validation occurs when the leader enables employees’ inclusion, involvement, and influence.
    Team members bring their best when they are respected and validated in ways that seamlessly include them . . . that involve them in options and decisions . . . and that gives them legitimate influence in their work and workplace.
    Anything less erodes engagement, service, and results, every time.

    • 4 min
    Culture Leadership Charge - Define & Align to Servant Purpose

    Culture Leadership Charge - Define & Align to Servant Purpose

    In our new book, Good Comes First, co-author Mark Babbitt and I propose four culture cornerstones that are the foundation of an uncompromising work culture.
    These cornerstones help align people and practices to your ideal work culture.
    Our first cornerstone, “Live Our Servant Purpose,” enables leaders, employees, contractors, and even customers to see that your company serves a purpose other than just making money.
    What is a “servant purpose”?
    A servant purpose describes how or what your company does and how it improves the quality of life for employees, customers, and the communities served.
    Essentially, your servant purpose is your company’s present-day reason for being—other than making a profit.
    That higher purpose shifts your organization’s primary focus from making money (or making red wagons, circuit boards, or sandwiches—none of which are innately inspiring to employees) to serving others: generating tangible benefit to your customers and your communities.
    When a leader lives her servant purpose, she doesn’t just serve that servant purpose—she also acts daily in service to her people. 
    In a Good Comes First company, a leader must ensure she is not the only leader in the organization modeling its servant purpose.
    Unfortunately, too many employees experience a crappy boss who is more concerned about compliance and conformity than creative work—a boss who doesn’t care about their people (respect), only about their bottom line (results). In today’s world of work, this is a significant reason far too many of our workplaces suck (and why many of those 48 million US workers voluntarily left their crappy jobs—and crappy bosses and crappy colleagues—in 2021). 
    Good Comes First companies employ and promote the leaders who are fully capable of embracing the servant purpose—and their people. Moreover, those servant-first leaders genuinely care about personal and professional growth and see each employee, contractor, vendor, and partner as an integral part of that growth. Just as important, these leaders treat any sign of inequality and bias as the cancer they represent in any workplace.
    And they insist their fellow leaders do the same. Soon, the entire leadership team is focused on not just results but on making people’s lives better. That, in turn, inspires your team members to model the servant purpose, as well.
    This episode was first published in video format on DrivingResultsThroughCulture.com on April 12, 2022. All rights reserved.

    • 3 min
    Culture Leadership Charge - Preconceived Notions May Steer You Wrong

    Culture Leadership Charge - Preconceived Notions May Steer You Wrong

    Business leaders today have a lot on their minds – and on their plates.
    They juggle hiring challenges. Mask mandates. Retaining talented players. Vaccine guidelines. Supply chain issues. Generating revenue. All these tasks are demanding, requiring attention and intention every minute.
    Yes, these are important considerations in today’s business environment. However, they are not the ONLY important considerations.
    Leaders may have a preconceived notion about these considerations: “This is my sole job: managing results.”
    When leaders are immersed in tasks like these, they may ignore reports that things aren’t going well in their work culture.
    If leaders learn about bosses behaving badly, most don’t want to deal with it. Another preconceived notion takes over: a perception that “managing results is more important” or “it can’t be that bad” or “HR will handle it.”
    Such preconceived notions are deeply flawed. The reality is that there is NOTHING more important for leaders to pay attention to than disrespect in their workplace.
    Here are two recent examples where preconceived notions may have contributed to bad boss behavior was enabled.
    Eric Lander, the top White House scientist, resigned on February 14 after a months-long investigation found he regularly bullied subordinates – particularly women and people of color.
    It’s good that Lander resigned. What is not good is how long it took to address his toxic behavior. Complaints were filed last year – yet Lander’s was not challenged to treat people respectfully. It is likely a preconceived notion that “Eric is rough around the edges” allowed him to stay in his role.
    California State University chancellor Joseph Castro resigned on February 17 after an investigation found he mishandled years of sexual harassment, bullying, and retaliation complaints against a senior administrator while Castro was president of CSU Fresno. Castro hired this administrator. A preconceived notion that “Frank means no harm” would explain Castro’s lack of interest in addressing the problem.
    Don’t let preconceived notions dissuade you from engaging willingly in workplace issues that arise. Results are certainly important – and they’re exactly HALF the leader’s job. The other half? Ensuring everyone is treated with respect, every day.
    This is episode 101 of my Culture Leadership Charge video series. In these concise videos, I share proven practices for building and sustaining a purposeful, positive, productive culture – where good comes first.
    You’ll find my Culture Leadership Charge and Good Comes First episodes and more on my YouTube, iTunes, and Amazon Podcast channels. If you like what you learn, please subscribe.
    Have you responded to this month’s culture leadership poll? Add your ratings to two questions. It’ll take less than a minute. Once you vote, click “results” to see the responses from around the globe.

    • 3 min
    Culture Leadership Charge - Learning from a Chiropractor

    Culture Leadership Charge - Learning from a Chiropractor

    I’m old. Over the years, back and neck pain caused me to hold my neck & shoulders & back very tightly – so moving wouldn’t hurt. Those tight muscles learned to be inflexible and immovable – so I wouldn’t hurt.
    Muscles are incredibly powerful. If they learn to be inflexible and immovable, they act like bones – firm and solid. That firmness causes muscles to adhere to other muscles (for greater inflexibility) which compresses nerves.
    The result was a pinched nerve in my neck. Two surgeries in the last two years helped reduce the pain but my hands still didn’t work right. My neurosurgeon said to find a good chiropractor.
    I found Dr. Eric. He’s been working on getting my neck and shoulder and back muscles to let go. He’s working to release those adhesions for greater strength and flexibility. His efforts have made my hands work better!
    The thing is – he couldn’t fix my muscles in one visit. It’s taken 27 weekly visits so far – and we’re not done yet.
    So, Dr. Eric makes changes a little at a time. He’s releasing muscles and retraining muscles. Slowly, the muscles learn to trust the “new normal,” working together rather than binding together.
    Changing the nature of a work culture requires the same approach.
    Just as muscles can become inflexible, organizations can become inflexible. Systems that made sense in the ’70s may not serve well today. Policies and procedures drafted decades ago may not enable the nimbleness needed to wow your customers now.
    Leadership beliefs that are embedded in the autocratic, command-and-control Industrial Age do not inspire employees of any generation.
    Many of our organizations – and our leaders – are stuck . . . immovable and inflexible.
    Just like Dr. Eric, leaders must work steadily and slowly to break down lousy structures and practices and build up respectful and validating practices.
    Some leaders might start with modifying policies and practices that pit people against each other.
    Others might begin mentoring leaders who rely on bullying to “inspire” results.
    Don’t wait. Begin the subtle refinements that will build clarity, commitment, and cohesion across your organization to sustain a work culture where respect is as important as results.
    This is episode one hundred of my Culture Leadership Charge series. In them, I share proven practices for building and sustaining a purposeful, positive, productive culture – where good comes first.
    You’ll find my Culture Leadership Charge and Good Comes First episodes and more on DrivingResultsThroughCulture.com and on my YouTube, iTunes, and Amazon Podcast channels. If you like what you learn, please subscribe.
    Have you responded to this month’s culture leadership poll? Add your ratings to two questions. It’ll take less than a minute. Once you vote, click “results” to see the responses from around the globe.

    • 3 min
    Culture Leadership Charge - Leaders, Here's Your 2022 Call to Action

    Culture Leadership Charge - Leaders, Here's Your 2022 Call to Action

    I’m reflecting on an anniversary this month. Twenty-eight years ago this month I had a heart attack.
    It was not how I planned to spend the day.
    Thanks to exceptional health professionals, dedicated family, and the grace of God, I survived.
    Like many others who have experienced a significant health issue, my heart attack caused me to reflect on my life. I knew my job at the time was not a great fit for me. I was not using my talents to proactively serve others.
    So, I left that role and started on the culture educator and consultant path. I am grateful to help leaders build and sustain workplaces where everyone is respected and validated for their ideas, efforts, and contributions every day.
    I pray you never have a myocardial infarction. Maybe my story can inspire reflection and action in the coming months.
    The world is going through a “heart attack” today. The pandemic has caused employees to reflect – and many have come to the conclusion that their workplaces are not healthy. So, they resign. Since April, more than 24 million US workers have voluntarily quit their jobs.
    Of those employees who have remained at work, a new global McKinsey study found that 40% of employees are likely to quit in the next three to six months.
    These numbers tell a sorrowful tale: our workplaces suck. Why? Because leaders don’t make respect as important as results.
    When leaders tolerate bad behavior — bullying, harassment, and worse — that’s what they’ll get across their work culture. If they define good behavior — respect, validation, and more — and hold everyone accountable for that good behavior, that’s what they’ll get across their work culture. The reality is leaders build a healthy work culture upon the constructive behaviors rewarded. They destroy a healthy work culture based on the deconstructive behaviors tolerated.
    Don’t wait. Don’t let your organization be another statistic in the tsunami of resignations in 2022.
    There is a proven pathway to creating an uncompromising work culture where respect drives results. Learn more at GoodComesFirst.com.
    This is episode ninety-nine of my Culture Leadership Charge series. In these concise recordings, I share the best practices for creating and sustaining a purposeful, positive, productive culture – where good comes first.
    You’ll find my Culture Leadership Charge and Good Comes First episodes and more on my YouTube, iTunes, and Amazon Podcast channels. If you like what you learn, please subscribe.
    Have you responded to this month’s culture leadership poll? Add your ratings to two questions. It’ll take less than a minute. Once you vote, click “results” to see the responses from around the globe.

    • 3 min

Customer Reviews

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2 Ratings

J Emerick ,

Culture and More

Chris challenges us to not just live our Personal Leadership Philosophy, he guides us step-by-step to transform organizations. The idea of an Organizational Constitution is a wonderful construct for those with leadership in their hearts. His stories, humility, and personal example are an inspiration we should widely share...

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