36 min

Earth day - Ana Nunēz Rodriguez & Isadora Romero Foam Talks

    • Arts

Foam Talks welcomes Ana Nunez Rodrigues and Isadora Romero, whose work traces personal and global stories around one specific vegetable: the potato. When we learn about the histories and ancestral knowledge connected to agriculture, it stimulates us to care about how our food grows. It is important to address this on Earth Day because of the inherent link between agriculture and climate change.

Nunez Rodriguez’s Cooking Potato Stories consists of local ‘potato stories’ that she collected across the world. Through these, she explores how food and agriculture connect to colonial legacies and how they need to be viewed in a wider context of political, social, and emotional relationships. In a similar approach, Romero explores the forgotten memory of the land and crops of her ancestral home, the village of Une, Cundinamarca, Colombia. Her project Blood is a Seed (La Sangre Es Una Semilla) centres around different generations of small farmers. Her grandfather and great-grandmother, who were "seed guardians" and cultivated several potato varieties.

Together with host Amelie Schüle, curator and head of public practice at Foam, the two will address the importance of storytelling as a form of resistance and the social dimensions of agriculture.

Foam Talks welcomes Ana Nunez Rodrigues and Isadora Romero, whose work traces personal and global stories around one specific vegetable: the potato. When we learn about the histories and ancestral knowledge connected to agriculture, it stimulates us to care about how our food grows. It is important to address this on Earth Day because of the inherent link between agriculture and climate change.

Nunez Rodriguez’s Cooking Potato Stories consists of local ‘potato stories’ that she collected across the world. Through these, she explores how food and agriculture connect to colonial legacies and how they need to be viewed in a wider context of political, social, and emotional relationships. In a similar approach, Romero explores the forgotten memory of the land and crops of her ancestral home, the village of Une, Cundinamarca, Colombia. Her project Blood is a Seed (La Sangre Es Una Semilla) centres around different generations of small farmers. Her grandfather and great-grandmother, who were "seed guardians" and cultivated several potato varieties.

Together with host Amelie Schüle, curator and head of public practice at Foam, the two will address the importance of storytelling as a form of resistance and the social dimensions of agriculture.

36 min

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