300 episodes

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

    What Viktor’s spoiled: ten years of Orban

    What Viktor’s spoiled: ten years of Orban

    Under Hungary’s shape-shifting prime minister the country has essentially become a dictatorship—and it seems there is little the European Union can do about it. We examine the serious mental-health effects the covid-19 crisis is having—and will have in the future. And Japan’s #KuToo movement aims to reform some seriously sexist dress codes at work. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 22 min
    Babbage: Maskarade

    Babbage: Maskarade

    The “silent transmission” of covid-19 means people without symptoms could be a major source of its spread. How effective are masks as a defence? Plus, Kenneth Cukier asks Ivan Oransky, co-founder of Retractionwatch.com, whether the race to uncover the mysteries of the virus could lead to a torrent of “bad science”.


    For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.
     
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    • 21 min
    Movement at the epicentre: Wuhan’s lockdown lifts

    Movement at the epicentre: Wuhan’s lockdown lifts

    People are spilling from the Chinese metropolis where the global outbreak took hold. But controls actually remain tight, and authorities’ attempts to spin pandemic into propaganda are not quite working. Mozambique’s rising violence threatens what could be Africa’s largest-ever energy project, in a region that has until now escaped widespread jihadism. And “geomythologists” may have uncovered humans’ oldest tale yet. 
    For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 23 min
    Money Talks: Banking on it

    Money Talks: Banking on it

    Banks have entered this financial crisis in better health than the previous one. But how sick might they get? Emerging-market lockdowns match rich-world ones but their governments cannot afford such generous handouts. Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz explains how emerging economies might weather the pandemic. And how Silicon Valley's unicorns are losing their sheen. Simon Long hosts 


    For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.
     
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    • 27 min
    States’ evidence: Brazil’s messy covid-19 response

    States’ evidence: Brazil’s messy covid-19 response

    President Jair Bolsonaro still dismisses the disease as “just the sniffles”, so state and local authorities—and the country’s vast slums—have taken matters into their own hands. The physical and mental needs of the world’s locked-down populations are driving a boom in online wellness. And we look back on the life of the French chef who revolutionised English fine dining.
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    • 23 min
    An app for that: covid surveillance

    An app for that: covid surveillance

    To keep track of the spread of covid-19, some governments are turning to digital surveillance, using mobile-phone apps and data networks. We ask whether this will work—and examine the threat to privacy posed by a digital panopticon. Britain’s Labour Party has a new leader. We ask in which direction Sir Keir Starmer will lead the opposition. And we report on the northern hemisphere’s winter that wasn’t. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy

    • 24 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
1.9K Ratings

1.9K Ratings

BGreig3 ,

Biased not balanced

Biased not balanced

Gets most issues WRONG, especially economic predictions.

Economist China reporters have lost their independence and spread CCP lies and propaganda, such as calling the USA racist, ironic coming from the most racist nation in history.

Economist USA reporters are clones of DNC media, no separation from other declining USA news organizations.

Economist is at its best when reporting worldwide stories from diverse sources.

Please spare us your biased opinions. Hi there

ImInTheSprings ,

Amazingly biased

The delusional chatter on the podcast I just listened to is very very sad. What happened to good journalism? Opinionated hit pieces are hateful and uninformed.

Genghis_Khan ,

British accent! too heavy

There is nothing wrong with speaking English, but some reporters have an accent so heavy that is not pleasent to listen, wish that will be fix.

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