1 hr 59 min

Egg London Podcast 010 - Reset Robot Egg London Podcast

    • Music

The UK has certainly been at the very forefront of the recent rise in popularity in house and techno worldwide. UK artists have provided their own distinctive sound, bringing new fans to the scene as well as rejuvenating existing house and techno lovers, showing them a new side. David Robertson aka Reset Robot is one such artist. His unique style blends high tempo tech house infused with chunky, dark techno elements. This style has led him inevitably to some of the most forward thinking labels within techno, with a string of productions being put out on the likes of True Soul and 8 Sided Dice. 2013 saw the Portsmouth lad hit the big time with tunes such as ‘False Widow’ being supported heavily by the likes of Tale Of Us and Richie Hawtin.However, it hasn’t been any easy journey for the rising star. Failed promises from his previous management led him having to completely reset his production plans. This would deter most, but his sheer determination led him to eventually to release on the infamous Dubfire Records.Constantly moving forward and looking for new opportunities, he and fellow techno superstar Alan Fitzpatrick announced recently the arrival of their new joint label, Whistleblower Records. What’s in store, who knows, but it certainly does wet the appetite if their solo efforts are anything to go by. We caught up with David after his recent set at Egg London alongside Mihai Popoviciu and Martin Eyerer to pick his brains.
Hey, so this set was recorded on Saturday 12th July at Egg London, how was it?
It was a great night, a little slow when I started but the room picked up nicely. I hadn’t seen it since the work had been done. It looks great now.
UK artists seem to be enjoying somewhat of a golden period in house and especially techno at the moment. Artists such as yourself, Alan Fitzpatrick, Scuba, Dense & Pika and Perc have enjoyed great success. What do you think has led to this and how has techno changed over the last few years?
Yes, it seems there are quite a few guys doing pretty well. I’m not sure how its ended up like this to be honest but dance music has always been a massive part of our culture. I think Techno has become more accessible, people didn’t even know what Techno was when I was at school or thought it was Gabba. It’s something that lots of people listen to now even if they don’t know it.
The UK has also seen an exodus in talent, who now reside in foreign cities when producing, most notably the trend to move to Berlin. Do you think your surroundings effects your productions and do you think we are in danger of losing our identity when it comes to musical talent? Detroit can be seen as an example of this, with very few artists now remaining there.I guess your surroundings might affect your productions but I haven’t really produced anywhere else so I can’t say from experience. I think Berlin has a great musical energy and people who move there are immersed in it. Having been there I can see why people might want to move there but there are always going to be others that don’t. You have a very unique sound, whop would you say are your biggest influences when it comes to both your productions and your DJ sets?Matthew Dear has been a big influence since I first heard ‘Leave Luck To Heaven'. Bill Patrick and tINI are also very influential at the moment. Their DJ sets are fantastic.So, you have just started up Whistleblower Records along with Alan Fitzpatrick. Can you tell us how this came about and what you aim to achieve with the label? Is there a certain musical route you will stick to?Yes, we’ve just started up the label with Rhymos and Con Fraser. We want to release our own music and try and find some interesting new talent. We’re also looking to tour with the label at some point. It would be nice to DJ together for a change.You had some big releases in 2013, whats planned f

The UK has certainly been at the very forefront of the recent rise in popularity in house and techno worldwide. UK artists have provided their own distinctive sound, bringing new fans to the scene as well as rejuvenating existing house and techno lovers, showing them a new side. David Robertson aka Reset Robot is one such artist. His unique style blends high tempo tech house infused with chunky, dark techno elements. This style has led him inevitably to some of the most forward thinking labels within techno, with a string of productions being put out on the likes of True Soul and 8 Sided Dice. 2013 saw the Portsmouth lad hit the big time with tunes such as ‘False Widow’ being supported heavily by the likes of Tale Of Us and Richie Hawtin.However, it hasn’t been any easy journey for the rising star. Failed promises from his previous management led him having to completely reset his production plans. This would deter most, but his sheer determination led him to eventually to release on the infamous Dubfire Records.Constantly moving forward and looking for new opportunities, he and fellow techno superstar Alan Fitzpatrick announced recently the arrival of their new joint label, Whistleblower Records. What’s in store, who knows, but it certainly does wet the appetite if their solo efforts are anything to go by. We caught up with David after his recent set at Egg London alongside Mihai Popoviciu and Martin Eyerer to pick his brains.
Hey, so this set was recorded on Saturday 12th July at Egg London, how was it?
It was a great night, a little slow when I started but the room picked up nicely. I hadn’t seen it since the work had been done. It looks great now.
UK artists seem to be enjoying somewhat of a golden period in house and especially techno at the moment. Artists such as yourself, Alan Fitzpatrick, Scuba, Dense & Pika and Perc have enjoyed great success. What do you think has led to this and how has techno changed over the last few years?
Yes, it seems there are quite a few guys doing pretty well. I’m not sure how its ended up like this to be honest but dance music has always been a massive part of our culture. I think Techno has become more accessible, people didn’t even know what Techno was when I was at school or thought it was Gabba. It’s something that lots of people listen to now even if they don’t know it.
The UK has also seen an exodus in talent, who now reside in foreign cities when producing, most notably the trend to move to Berlin. Do you think your surroundings effects your productions and do you think we are in danger of losing our identity when it comes to musical talent? Detroit can be seen as an example of this, with very few artists now remaining there.I guess your surroundings might affect your productions but I haven’t really produced anywhere else so I can’t say from experience. I think Berlin has a great musical energy and people who move there are immersed in it. Having been there I can see why people might want to move there but there are always going to be others that don’t. You have a very unique sound, whop would you say are your biggest influences when it comes to both your productions and your DJ sets?Matthew Dear has been a big influence since I first heard ‘Leave Luck To Heaven'. Bill Patrick and tINI are also very influential at the moment. Their DJ sets are fantastic.So, you have just started up Whistleblower Records along with Alan Fitzpatrick. Can you tell us how this came about and what you aim to achieve with the label? Is there a certain musical route you will stick to?Yes, we’ve just started up the label with Rhymos and Con Fraser. We want to release our own music and try and find some interesting new talent. We’re also looking to tour with the label at some point. It would be nice to DJ together for a change.You had some big releases in 2013, whats planned f

1 hr 59 min

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