62 episodes

The Electronic Information, the Visual Arts and Beyond (EVA Conferences) are a series of international interdisciplinary conferences mainly in Europe, but also elsewhere in the world, for people interested in the application of information technology to the cultural and especially the visual arts field.

Electronic Visualisation and the Arts London 2011 BCS - The Chartered Institute for IT

    • Education

The Electronic Information, the Visual Arts and Beyond (EVA Conferences) are a series of international interdisciplinary conferences mainly in Europe, but also elsewhere in the world, for people interested in the application of information technology to the cultural and especially the visual arts field.

    Reconstruction of Historic Landscapes

    Reconstruction of Historic Landscapes

    When the eccentric and reclusive connoisseur William Beckford (1760-1844), having exhausted the largest inherited fortune in England, finally abandoned his doomed architectural extravaganza at Fonthill Abbey, he retired to Bath. His enthusiasm for tower-building soon revived, and with the help of his trusted gardener Vincent and an able young architect Henry Goodrich he set about making a linear landscape garden stretching from his home in Lansdown Crescent to the hilltop 100m above. Though the Crescent house he lived in, and the tower he built on the hill, survive with little change, everything in between is now lost beneath more recent development.

    From the dome of heaven to a cupola in space: re-engaging with imagery and symbolism through 3D digital art installations

    From the dome of heaven to a cupola in space: re-engaging with imagery and symbolism through 3D digital art installations

    This paper looks at the possibilities of re-engaging with imagery and symbolism from earlier cultures through the medium of 3D digital environments. It examines three of the author's digital artworks - Oculus, Lux Nova and Music of the Spheres - as vehicles for this process, and the means by which this engagement with the past can also generate new ideas within the area of art and technology. The recreation of an architectural sense of space and position is of particular importance, as is the development of particular approach to 3D software.

    Optical Measurement Techniques for multi-dimensional measurement of Cultural Heritage

    Optical Measurement Techniques for multi-dimensional measurement of Cultural Heritage

    Optical measurement systems were originally developed for industrial applications. Due to their versatility of use and "touchless" non-invasive method of working they have also been employed for many years in the field of restoration, conservation and preservation of cultural heritage. The capabilities of a variety of optical measuring methods e.g. photogrammetry, laser triangulation and interferometry have been theoretically described and their varying applications for restoration and conservation explored 10 years ago. This paper provides an overview of the utilization and implementation of Optical Measurement Systems in the field of restoration, conservation and preservation of cultural heritage that could be observed over the last ten years. Theory and function of the above mentioned systems for shape and deformation measurement of Cultural Heritage will be introduced shortly. The paper will then focus on the practical benefit of Optical Technology such as: 3D and digital archiving, monitoring of deterioration and deformation over time, precise copying and reconstruction, documentation and research, transportation packaging, etc.

    Handheld handholding: small-screen support for museum visitors

    Handheld handholding: small-screen support for museum visitors

    Increasingly museums are developing information systems and guides to be accessed from small mobile devices. Some of these initiatives utilise proprietary hardware and software that can require substantial development resources. More recently museums have had the option to target personal mobile devices, (e.g. Apple iPhone or Google Android handsets) which potentially require a lower investment cost on the part of the institution. While the sophistication of these handheld devices means that a large volume of information can be stored and displayed, the challenge for museums is to provide usable access via the small screen area available. Taking examples from work done during the development of the British Museum multimedia guide, this paper discusses the processes and techniques available for usability testing in a 'live' museum environment and shows how the use of low-cost usability and user testing techniques can be quickly fed back into the development process, making a valuable contribution to the ultimate design and effectiveness of the user interface.

    Universal access in 3000 years? The Digital Collections of the State Hermitage Museum

    Universal access in 3000 years? The Digital Collections of the State Hermitage Museum

    Educating and engaging museum audiences in contemporary times is becoming even more important, considering the persistent information society, which has created the need for museums to utilise new methods of communication. Digitisation has therefore become the new instrument for access and preservation in museums. However, the process of digitisation has brought about many challenges for museums, one of the most problematic is deciding what to digitise in the first instance from the wide range of collections. This paper presents a case study of the Hermitage museum and its process of digitising a small part of its large collection, as well as the procedures and strategies regarding the main selection criteria for the objects to be digitised. This study is based on qualitative research using a case study of the Hermitage museum utilizing interviews with the museum's officials responsible for digital collections and projects managers of the International Business Machine (IBM) Corporation, who developed the digital library for the museum. The study employs the analysis of the empirical material and draws on the theoretical frameworks of Walter Benjamin, Fiona Cameron, and others. It reveals that the selection process of the objects being digitised is still crucial and relevant for the current agenda of digitisation in museums. The results of the analysis suggest that such a selection process should be more open and should rely on the opinion of interested communities and museum stakeholders.

    Things': a case study in getting from accession to online display in 60 minutes

    Things': a case study in getting from accession to online display in 60 minutes

    This paper looks at the online presence of the exhibition 'Things' by artist Keith Wilson that took place at Wellcome Collection in October 2010. It examines the process by which objects were temporarily acquired from members of the public for an exhibition, and the way in which those images were digitised and managed to form the online element of the exhibition, using the photo sharing website Flickr. It looks at the role of student volunteers and their reaction to the use of technology, as well as the reactions of the public to the use of images online to represent their donated objects, and some alternatives to the conventional 'object' photography that museums employ. It draws the conclusion that images, and digital images in particular, form an increasingly important part of the museum paradigm at all levels.

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