97 episodes

Emerging Form is a podcast about the creative process in which a journalist (Christie Aschwanden) and a poet (Rosemerry Wahtola Trommer) discuss creative conundrums over wine. Each episode concludes with a game of two questions in which a guest joins in to help answer questions about the week's topic. Season one guests include poets, novelists, journalists, a song writer, a circus performer, a sketch artist and a winemaker.

emergingform.substack.com

Emerging Form Christie Aschwanden

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 38 Ratings

Emerging Form is a podcast about the creative process in which a journalist (Christie Aschwanden) and a poet (Rosemerry Wahtola Trommer) discuss creative conundrums over wine. Each episode concludes with a game of two questions in which a guest joins in to help answer questions about the week's topic. Season one guests include poets, novelists, journalists, a song writer, a circus performer, a sketch artist and a winemaker.

emergingform.substack.com

    Episode 69: Travel and the Muse with Laurie Wagner

    Episode 69: Travel and the Muse with Laurie Wagner

    Noticing and being present are two essential ingredients for creativity, and in today’s episode, writer Laurie Wagner discusses how travel can facilitate creative traits like these and help you connect with your muse. She tells us about how being in a foreign place helps her move slower and see things anew. “Our lives are passing, and we think we are going someplace,” she says, but meanwhile life is passing us by in this present moment, and that’s where creativity lies.

    PLEASE NOTE: we are taking a short summer break after our Episode 69 bonus next week. If you are a paid subscriber, your subscription will be put on hold (you won’t be charged) until we’re back in late August.

    Laurie Wagner has been publishing books and essays, and teaching writing for the last 25 years. She is a process guru and has a genius for holding space, helping people unzip what’s inside of them, and get ink on the page. A creative brain-stormer, she specializes in out of the box ways to tell your stories. Her Wild Writing classes are the cornerstone of her live work. She teaches weekly, small groups, and also hosts The Wild Family, a large group of writers from around the world who write together weekly.  She is the author of Living Happily Ever After: Couples Talk about Long Term Love, and Expectations: 30 Women Talk about Becoming a Mother. Check out her blog at: 27powers.org

    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit emergingform.substack.com

    • 32 min
    Episode 69: How Rachel Feltman Wrote "Been There, Done That: A Rousing History of Sex"

    Episode 69: How Rachel Feltman Wrote "Been There, Done That: A Rousing History of Sex"

    How does a book come together? We speak with Rachel Feltman, author of Been There, Done That: A Rousing History of Sex, about the evolution of her book, from first inklings to years of research to organization to completion. She explains how she answered the burning question, “How do I make this a book and not just a pile of words?” Her secrets include A 500-mile ride on a tandem bike, a morning routine, a great agent and editor, the willingness to turn in her “hottest garbage,” and a three-word mantra that will help jumpstart every creative process. 

    Rachel Feltman’s first paying gig was organizing a bookshelf full of textbooks on vulvar disease at the age of seven, and she never looked back. She’s the Executive Editor of Popular Science and hosts PopSci’s podcast The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week. In 2014, Feltman founded the Washington Post’s Speaking of Science blog, known for headlines such as “You probably have herpes, but that’s really okay,” and “Uranus might be full of surprises.” Feltman studied environmental science at Simon’s Rock and has a master’s in science reporting from NYU. She’s a musician, an actress, and the stepmom of a very spry 14-year-old cat.

    Rachel’s website

    https://www.boldtypebooks.com/titles/rachel-feltman/been-there-done-that/9781668605042/

    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit emergingform.substack.com

    • 33 min
    Episode 67 – Inspiration from other genres

    Episode 67 – Inspiration from other genres

    Need inspiration? Look to other arts. This practice, known as ekphrasis–the art of making art inspired by other art, can “fill the well” and create a rich field of ideas to play with. In this episode, Rosemerry offers a provocative list of specific ways one might engage with another work of art and gives examples from her recent poems responding to the paintings of Vincent van Gogh and the music of our previous guest Kayleen Asbo (episode 27, Creative Communities). And Christie talks about novels she’s read this year by Emily St. John, Anthony Doerr and others that are teaching her new ways to engage audiences around the pandemic, the destruction of the natural world, and how to live in a broken world. 

    Kayleen Asbo

    Love Letters to Vincent Salon with Kayleen and Rosemerry

    “In the Wheat Field with Crows” by Rosemerry

    “Wheat Field with Crows” by Vincent Van Gogh

    “Almond Blossom” by Rosemerry

    “Almond Blossom” by Vincent Van Gogh

    Novels Christie recently read and loved

    Emily St. John Mandel, Sea of Tranquility, Station Eleven

    Benjamín Labatut, When We Cease to Understand the World

    Anthony Doerr, Cloud Cuckoo Land

    Richard Powers, The Overstory and Bewilderment

    Lily King, Euphoria

    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit emergingform.substack.com

    Episode 66: Life Cycle of A Creative Project with Laura Joyce Davis

    Episode 66: Life Cycle of A Creative Project with Laura Joyce Davis

    Some projects take on a life of their own–what begins as a side project might grow into a life-style change and new career. But how do we know if or when to end it? How do external factors influence it? What do we learn about adaptation and trust? In this episode of Emerging Form, we bring back podcaster Laura Joyce Davis, host and executive producer of the award-winning narrative podcast Shelter in Place. We talk about committing to projects you don’t know how to do, learning from failure, spin off projects, sustainability, finding closure and learning into the next chapter. 

    Laura Joyce Davis is the host and executive producer of the award-winning narrative podcast Shelter in Place. She and her writer husband Nate together created the Social Impact Award-winning mentorship program Kasama Collective, as well as Labs Weekender, a self-paced narrative podcasting course. Podcast Magazine named Laura in their Top 22 Influencers in Podcasting for 2022. A writer for more than twenty years, her fiction has been recognized with a Fulbright scholarship, a Poets & Writers Magazine Exchange Award, two Pushcart Prize nominations, and occasional praise from her 3 children who believe that anything is possible with a good book, a cape, and a crown (she doesn't disagree).

    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit emergingform.substack.com

    • 42 min
    Episode 65: A Creative Walk with Valencia Robin

    Episode 65: A Creative Walk with Valencia Robin

    Walking. So simple, and yet putting one foot in front of the other is one of the most profound things you can do for your creative practice. In this episode of Emerging Form, we speak with award-winning poet and painter Valencia Robin about how walking has inspired her practice. We bring in science to support what we all know intuitively–moving the body helps open the brain. And Robin (as we call her throughout the podcast) shares poems by contemporary poets and herself, too, that invoke the art of walking. 

    Valencia Robin’s debut poetry collection, Ridiculous Light, is the winner of Persea Books’ Lexi Rudnitsky First Book Prize, a finalist for the 2020 Kate Tufts Discovery Award and was named one of the best poetry books of 2019 by Library Journal. Robin’s other honors include a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, the Emily Clark Balch Award, the Hocking Hills Power of Poetry Prize and fellowships from Cavé Cahnem, the Furious Flower Poetry Center, the University of Virginia, Bennington College and the Vermont College of Fine Arts. A poetry instructor as well as a co-director of the University of Virginia Young Writers Workshop, Robin has an MFA in Creative Writing from  the University of Virginia and an MFA in Art & Design from the University of Michigan, where she also co-founded GalleryDAAS. Also a painter and curator, Robin’s visual work has been exhibited nationally and supported by the King-Chavez-Parks Future Faculty Fellowship and the Center for the Education of Women’s Margaret Towsley Fellowship.

    Valencia Robin’s website

    Stanford study finds walking improves creativity

    Rebecca Solnit, Wanderlust: A History of Walking

    Ross Gay, “To the Fig Tree on 9th and Christian”

    Ada Limón, “During the Impossible Age of Everyone” 

    Valencia Robin, “After Graduate School”

    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit emergingform.substack.com

    • 28 min
    Episode 64 bonus: Alison Luterman on coaxing the form to emerge and skies before screens.

    Episode 64 bonus: Alison Luterman on coaxing the form to emerge and skies before screens.

    “You wouldn’t yell at a preemie baby,” says poet, lyricist, playwright and teacher Alison Luterman. In this bonus episode, we talk about Alison’s “coaxing” approach for her new work, about patience, self-compassion, starting the morning without screens, the benefits and detriments of having many projects at once, and, of course, the importance of coffee. 

    Alison Luterman's four books of poetry are The Largest Possible Life; See How We Almost Fly; Desire Zoo, and In the Time of Great Fires. Her poems and stories have appeared in The New York Times Sunday Magazine, The Sun, Rattle, Nimrod, Salon, Prairie Schooner, The Brooklyn Review, The Atlanta Review, Tattoo Highway, and in numerous other journals and anthologies. She has written an e-book of personal essays (Feral City, originally published through SheWrites.com, now available through audible.com), half a dozen plays including a musical The Chain about a chain of kidney transplant donors and recipients), lyrics for a song cycle We Are Not Afraid of the Dark, and is currently working on two different musical theater projects as well as new poems and a longer version of her recently-published essay about learning to sing as an, ahem!, older adult.

    Previous episodes with Alison: Creative Practice as Political Action and A poem and a song from Alison Luterman

    This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit emergingform.substack.com

    • 15 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
38 Ratings

38 Ratings

NinoAgogo ,

Puts the “Po” in “InsPo”

Poetry puts the “Po” in this sweet “InsPo” — the poetry of a friendship between professional writers from different disciplines. The hosts apply their sparkling chemistry and thoughtful interview style to the task of helping the creative community with tools, insights and a feeling of camaraderie that permeates this delightful podcast. Hits on many level — intellectual, fun and very relatable.

And…. gotta love that cello!

chelseawald ,

Insights about the creative process

The conversations in this podcast are wise, gentle, encouraging, warm, and funny. I listen when I need to nourish my creative spirit.

Cindy.Kuzma ,

Inspirational and aspirational

I’m a journalist who writes about running and science and I’ve always admired Christie Aschwanden’s work. Listening to her in conversation with a poet has brought a whole new perspective to her work, and my own—and introduced me to new ideas and formats I never would have contemplated. I truly appreciate the way they’ve navigated the pandemic and the social unrest afterward, too. I respect their choice to take a summer break but I’ll be eagerly awaiting their return.

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