100 episodes

At Organixx our mission is simple: "Supporting you in being the healthiest YOU possible." Subscribe to hear cutting edge natural health topics. Let natural health leaders share their knowledge and empower you to live a healthier life. We're dedicated to supporting you because we've all experienced pain, suffering, and the struggle of our own bodies, or a loved one not being the healthiest they can be.

Empowering You Organically - Video Edition Organixx

    • Health & Fitness
    • 3.7 • 3 Ratings

At Organixx our mission is simple: "Supporting you in being the healthiest YOU possible." Subscribe to hear cutting edge natural health topics. Let natural health leaders share their knowledge and empower you to live a healthier life. We're dedicated to supporting you because we've all experienced pain, suffering, and the struggle of our own bodies, or a loved one not being the healthiest they can be.

    • video
    The Magic of Nettle Tea

    The Magic of Nettle Tea

    If you’ve had the experience of walking through a meadow or trail in the woods and found yourself with a bristly rash on exposed parts of your limbs, you may have brushed up against some stinging nettle. Nettles are an herbaceous perennial flowering plant, native to Europe, Asia, northern Africa, and North America. Tune in to learn how nettles actually support vibrant health!
     
    What is nettle? Nettle, or stinging nettle, is a shrub that comes from northern Europe and Asia. Its scientific name is Urtica dioica.
    If you’ve had the experience of walking through a meadow or trail in the woods and found yourself with a bristly rash on exposed parts of your limbs, you may have brushed up against some stinging nettle. Nettles are an herbaceous perennial flowering plant, native to Europe, Asia, northern Africa, and North America.
    The plant has many hollow stinging hairs called “trichomes” on its leaves and stems, which act like needles that inject histamine, formic acid and other chemicals that produce a stinging sensation. It’s very high nutritional content has made it a popular food source steamed and eaten like spinach (it does loose the “sting” when cooked), taken as a tea made from the dried leaves to assist in the nutrition of expectant or nursing mothers, or for general tonic properties for good health.
    The leaves, stem, or root from the nettle plant can be crushed and made into powders, tinctures, creams, teas, and more. While people have used it for centuries as an herbal medicine, modern research also supports many of the potential health benefits of nettle and nettle tea.
    Stinging nettle’s leaves and root provide a wide variety of nutrients, including:
    Vitamins: Vitamins A, C and K, as well as several B vitamins Minerals: Calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium and sodium Fats: Linoleic acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid and oleic acid Amino acids: All of the essential amino acids Polyphenols: Kaempferol, quercetin, caffeic acid, coumarins and other flavonoids Pigments: Beta-carotene, lutein, luteoxanthin and other carotenoids What’s more, many of these nutrients act as antioxidants inside your body.
    Antioxidants are molecules that help defend your cells against damage from free radicals. Damage caused by free radicals is linked to aging, as well as cancer and other harmful diseases.
    Studies indicate that stinging nettle extract can raise blood antioxidant levels.
    Top 5 Benefits of Nettles 1. Urinary tract health Nettle may help flush harmful bacteria from the urinary tract. This can benefit people who have urinary conditions, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). BPH causes an enlarged prostate gland in men. This can cause pain or other problems urinating.
    According to one 2013 study men with BPH who took nettle extract had fewer clinical symptoms than those who didn’t.
    Nettle may also help support any medications you’re taking for infections or conditions related to the urinary tract. Talk to your doctor first about any possible interactions between herbal remedies and medications you take.
    2. Arthritis and pain Nettle has historically been used to treat pain and sore muscles, especially related to arthritis. The Arthritis Foundation suggests that nettle tea may also reduce the inflammation and pain association with osteoarthritis.
    3. Blood sugar management Nettle has shown some promising effects on blood glucose levels. It may help the pancreas make or release more insulin, the hormone that lowers blood sugar.
    In a 2013 study, nettle leaf extract lowered blood glucose and A1C in a group of people with type 2 diabetes who were taking insulin as well as oral diabetes medications.
    4. The power of polyphenols Nettle is high in plant chemicals called polyphenols. A review of the research on polyphenols suggests that these powerful compounds may play a role in the prevention and management of chronic diseases related to inflammation, such as diabetes,

    • 14 min
    • video
    Turmeric and Black Pepper: The Best Way to Take Turmeric?

    Turmeric and Black Pepper: The Best Way to Take Turmeric?

    You’ve likely heard about the many health benefits of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) and its compound curcumin. But did you know that it can be difficult to “unlock” the nutrients in turmeric so your body can actually take full advantage of them? Tune in to today’s episode to unlock the magic of turmeric!
     
    Turmeric and Black Pepper: The Best Way to Take Turmeric? You’ve likely heard about the many health benefits of turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) and its compound curcumin. But did you know that it can be difficult to “unlock” the nutrients in turmeric so your body can actually take full advantage of them?
    One popular way to make the compounds in turmeric more bioavailable (absorbable and usable to the body) is to pair it with another popular cooking spice: black pepper [1]. But what if there was a better way than combining turmeric and black pepper? A way to boost turmeric’s bioavailability, allowing it to more safely and effectively support the natural healing process?
     
    The Healing Power of Turmeric Turmeric is a staple remedy from the traditional medicine systems of the Far East that has gained widespread popularity throughout the West in recent years as a “super” spice.
    Turmeric’s many health-supportive properties are attributed to curcumin, a key component of turmeric that’s associated with longevity. Curcumin is documented in the scientific literature as offering powerful support for the cardiovascular, neurological, metabolic, immune, and cellular systems. It’s also the part of turmeric that gives this root spice its rich, golden yellow color.
    But the truth of the matter is that humans have a difficult time getting all the health benefits from turmeric when consuming the spice all by itself. Research shows that only a very small portion of it is assimilated into the body when eaten in isolation.
    This is why many natural health experts suggest consuming turmeric along with black pepper (Piper nigrum). Black pepper contains a unique “bio-enhancer” compound known as piperine that significantly boosts turmeric’s bioavailability – by as much as 2,000 percent, in fact.
    This is the reason why many turmeric and curcumin supplement products on the market today contain either black pepper or piperine.
     
    The Problem: Black Pepper Isn’t Good for Everyone This pairing approach of turmeric and black pepper comes with limitations, however, as too much black pepper can actually be detrimental to health – especially in people with gastrointestinal issues.Research published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology found that consuming black pepper in excess can damage the mucosal lining of the gut, potentially causing bleeding or other injuries.
    Consuming high amounts of black pepper, this same study found, is akin to taking the painkiller drug aspirin [2]. In other words, aspirin represents a similar threat to the gut lining in terms of its tendency to cause serious erosions and ulcers in the intestinal tract [3].
    This isn’t to say that black pepper is inherently dangerous, and there’s no need to toss out the pepper shaker just yet. After all, the amounts of black pepper required to induce such harm are far greater than what the average person consumes in their food on a daily basis.
    There’s also evidence to show that taking curcumin along with just piperine, black pepper’s primary alkaloid, is typically safe and causes “no adverse effects [4].”
    Even so, there’s always the possibility that someone might react negatively to this combination – especially when taking very high doses of turmeric or curcumin for therapeutic purposes.
    For this reason, science set out to determine whether or not it was possible to retain turmeric’s full bioavailability without the need for black pepper, piperine, or any other additive. And the good news is, it is possible.
     
    Fermentation Increases the Power of Turmeric BETTER Than Black Pepper As it turns out, by fermenti

    • 14 min
    • video
    A Superhero Herb for Body & Brain: KSM-66 Ashwagandha

    A Superhero Herb for Body & Brain: KSM-66 Ashwagandha

    Ashwagandha is an important herb used in the ancient Indian system of medicine known as Ayurveda to promote general health and well-being. In Ayurvedic practice, ashwagandha is classified as a Rasayana, which means an herb or preparation that rejuvenates, extends life, and promotes a youthful state of physical and mental health. Listen in to discover more about ashwagandha’s incredible health benefits in general and a special potent “superhero” form known as KSM-66 ashwagandha.
     
    What Does Ashwagandha Do? Ashwagandha’s superpower is that it is an adaptogen. Adaptogens are non-toxic therapies that normalize our bodily functions – both physical and mental – that are thrown out of balance when we are exposed to chronic, uncontrolled stress. They do so by correcting imbalances in the neuroendocrine and immune systems [2]. In short, adaptogens enhance our ability to cope with stress.
    There are more than 35 natural compounds in ashwagandha including alkaloids, steroidal lactones, saponins, and with anolides. These compounds have been shown to have anti-stress activity in multiple laboratory models of chronic stress and in some human studies as well [1-5].
    Additionally, ashwagandha extracts as well as specific bioactive compounds present in this plant – primarily in the roots – have been shown to help:
    counter pain and joint swelling associated with arthritis boost various components of the immune system protect the brain and nervous system slow down or even kill abnormal cells enhance both male and female sexual desire and function What Is KSM-66 Ashwagandha? KSM-66 Ashwagandha is a high-concentration ashwagandha root extract manufactured and sold by Ixoreal Biomed, located in Hyderabad, India [6]. Ashwagandha KSM-66 is made solely from ashwagandha roots, which contain its main bioactive ingredients, without using any other parts that are considered to be less effective.
    A unique feature of KSM-66 ashwagandha is that it’s standardized to a withanolide content of at least 5 percent. Withanolides are a group of around 300 naturally occurring steroid compounds, some of which are naturally present in ashwagandha.
    One example is Withaferin A, an anti-inflammatory compound that has also been shown to stop tumors from growing their own blood vessels, slowing down their growth, and perhaps even shrinking them.
    Last but not least, KSM-66 ashwagandha is produced by a unique extraction process, based on the principles of “green chemistry,” without using alcohol or any synthetic solvents.
    Let’s take a closer look now at some of KSM-66 ashwagandha’s benefits for health.
     
    What Too Much Cortisol Does to the Body Any stressful event in our lives causes our adrenal glands to produce cortisol, a steroid hormone that acts to control blood sugar levels, regulate metabolism, lower inflammation levels, influence memory formation, and manage salt and water balance [7].
    The more stressed we are and the longer we’re stressed, the more our adrenals respond by releasing cortisol into our bloodstream. Too much cortisol in the blood over a prolonged period of time can lead to:
    rapid weight gain high blood pressure osteoporosis muscle weakness mood swings anxiety, depression, or irritability increased thirst and frequency of urination [7] Ongoing high cortisol levels can also eventually cause a lack of sex drive in men. In women, periods typically become irregular, less frequent, or may even stop altogether (amenorrhea).
     
    How Can Ashwagandha Help Us Cope With Stress? To answer this question, a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of KSM-66 ashwagandha (which, as mentioned above, is a high-concentration, full-spectrum ashwagandha root extract) in 64 adults [5]. After 60 days of treatment, the study authors observed a “substantial reduction” in four separate measures of stress in the study participants.
    KSM-66 ashwagandha also reduc

    • 28 min
    • video
    The BIG 3 Anti-Inflammatories: Frankincense, Myrrh & Turmeric

    The BIG 3 Anti-Inflammatories: Frankincense, Myrrh & Turmeric

    Let’s talk synergy….the interaction or cooperation of two or more organizations, substances, or other agents to produce a combined effect greater than the sum of their separate effects. At Organixx we believe in maximizing the strength of our blended supplements by sourcing high quality and clean ingredients. And then we take it to the next level by asking the question…”What ingredients can we blend to produce a combined benefit greater than the sum of their separate benefits?”
     
    Frankincense
    Frankincense is the resinous extract from the trees of the genus boswellia, have been used for centuries in cultural ceremonies, as a cosmetic agent, as a traditional medicine to treat a variety of ailments, especially inflammatory diseases, which we just talked about, including asthma, arthritis, cerebral edema, chronic pain syndrome, chronic bowel diseases, cancer, and some other illnesses. Boswellic acids are the active compounds of frankincense. Some studies have shown that the use of frankincense can also improve the learning, enhance the memory in animals and human beings. Two ways that you can get frankincense Essential oil Ingesting  
    Myrrh
    Myrrh is a reddish-brown dried sap from a thorny tree. Commiphora myrrha is the actual name for it, but it’s native to Northeastern Africa and Southwest Asia. Myrrh has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurvedic medicine. Scientists are now testing the oil’s potential uses, including for pain, infection, and even skin sores. Myrrh also can help combat pain and swelling, and it’s also a very powerful antioxidant, which combats oxidative damage, which we know can be really bad for our health. Oxidative damage from free radicals contributes to aging and even some diseases.  
    Turmeric
    Turmeric is believed to be one of the most effective nutritional supplements in existence. Many high-quality studies have shown that it has major benefits for your body and for your brain. Turmeric is the spice that gives curry its yellow color and has been used in India for thousands of years as a spice and medicinal herb. Recently, scientists started to back up what Indians have known for a long time. It has powerful anti-inflammatory effects. It’s a very strong antioxidant.  It is very, very, very powerful when it comes to brain health, when it comes to combatting disease. Turmeric, in its raw form, it’s not very bioavailable, again, which means it’s hard for your body to absorb it and really to get the curcumin, which is the real active compound out of turmeric that’s the big benefit, and I mean we’re talking single digit percentage of curcumin that you absorb out of turmeric. If you’re looking at using turmeric on a daily basis, I think that you can use piperine if your body reacts well to it. Piperine changes the enzymes in your stomach, which is what helps make it more bioavailable for the turmeric. That same thing happens if you’re on prescription medication. So, I always warn people, if you’re taking prescription meds, kind of stay away from the turmeric supplements that have piperine in them, or black pepper, because it can increase or decrease the efficacy of that prescription med, which also increases and decreases the efficacy of the side effects of it. When you ferment it, that releases those enzymes so that when you ingest it into your body, now all of the enzymes that your body needs to break down that turmeric and absorb that curcumin is right there in your gut. It can also support brain health. It’s been proven to improve brain function and lower risk of brain diseases. It can lower your risk of heart disease.  
    Putting Them Together
    They have a synergistic effect, having all three of these ingredients together. So strong and so powerful, we actually created a supplement called Magi-Complexx. What we found out is actually combining all three of these together, that synergistic effect is phenomenal.  
    Magi-Complex

    • 17 min
    Collagen for Your Skin: Hype or Healthy?

    Collagen for Your Skin: Hype or Healthy?

    The search term collagen has increased 40% already just in this year alone! So, is all the hype trendy or true? We’ve done the research and that’s the question we answer this week!
    Did you know that your body naturally produces collagen every day? We dig into why supplementation is even a consideration.
    Did you know there are several different types of collagen? We’ve tracked them all down and explain the part each type plays in our body.
    Is collagen all about less sagging skin? Actually, no it isn’t! Tune in to hear about the ways collagen benefits our health. We guarantee some will surprise you.
    Tune in for more no-nonsense information on what collagens are, how they may benefit your health, and what you need to look for when it comes to the products and foods, you’re consuming.
     
    Did you know that your body naturally produces collagen every day? We dig into why supplementation is even a consideration.
     
    Did you know there are several different types of collagen? We’ve tracked them all down and explain the part each type plays in our body.
     
    Is collagen all about less sagging skin? Actually, no it isn’t! Tune in to hear about the ways collagen benefits our health. We guarantee some will surprise you.
     
    Tune in for more no-nonsense information on what collagens are, how they may benefit your health, and what you need to look for when it comes to the products and foods, you’re consuming.
     
    What is collagen?
    Dictionary result for collagen /ˈkäləjən/
    noun
    the main structural protein found in skin and other connective tissues, widely used in purified form for cosmetic surgical treatments. “vitamin C plays a vital role in the formation of collagen” Different collagen molecules make up about ⅓ of the total protein in a human body Found in bone, skin, muscles, and tendons The substance that connects cells and gives skin elasticity as well as strength  
    Collagen and Aging
    Your body naturally produces collagen every day. After the age of 25, we break down more collagen than we make. Collagen supplements are an easy way to add more collagen to your diet. Collagen has been shown to reduce wrinkles, keep joints strong and flexible, support strong bones, and increase skin hydration.  
    Why is collagen so good for you?
    Collagen is vital for maintaining the structure and integrity of your entire body.
     
    #1 – Strong Cartilage and Muscles
    Cartilage is a type of connective tissue that is made up of collagen When you lack collagen, joint instability, stiffness, and pain can result. Likewise, muscles need cartilage to adhere themselves to the ends of bones. This is why muscle aches are one of the most common complaints of individuals with low collagen levels.  
    #2 – Healthy Teeth.
    Collagen is needed to keep teeth in place in the gums. Loose teeth, toothache, sensitive teeth, and even tooth loss can result from a lack of collagen overall.  
    #3 – Thick Hair
    Collagen plays an important part in hair growth since it fills in the spaces around each hair follicle. One way to tell if you are collagen deficient is to notice the quality and state of your hair. Dull, thin hair is a sign of low collagen levels. Collagen also helps fight free radicals that can damage hair. #4 – Smooth Skin
    Wrinkling and cellulite are other unfortunate results of low collagen in the body. Not enough collagen means skin begins to lose elasticity and sag, causing those pesky wrinkles as we age. Cellulite is another telltale sign of low collagen. #5 – Good Gut Health.
    Collagen helps heal the gut because of its ability to “seal the gut.” Leaky gut has been linked to autoimmune conditions and neurological conditions like autism. Types of Collagens
    There are over two dozen kinds of collagen, although roughly 85% of the collagen in the body is made up of Type I, II, or III (or a combination of these three types).
    Type I collagen is the most prevalent type of collagen. It is the subst

    • 57 min
    • video
    A Critically Important Nutrient You Probably Don’t Think About

    A Critically Important Nutrient You Probably Don’t Think About

    Ready for some FREE education? So, let’s talk about iodine. Iodine is essential for every function in your body including immune function, cardiovascular health, and metabolism. Of course it’s instrumental for the thyroid. That’s one of the big things we talk about in connection with iodine since iodine is the foundation for thyroid hormone production. So, it’s super important.
    Do you ever think about iodine? Probably not. But you probably should! We’re going to talk about iodine deficiency. We’re going to talk in general about iodine; where did it come from, why it’s important, and the different types or sources of iodine for your health. Tune in and get your learn on!
     
    Iodine
    The fact is that iodine is utilized for just about every function in your body. Yet many people are unaware of their body’s need for iodine, and that iodine deficiency has reached epidemic proportions worldwide.
     History of Iodine
    Iodine was discovered in 1811 Iodine actually became the first modern medical treatment. It was the first time in medicine that one remedy was used to treat one disease, and that was when iodine was used to treat goiters. Iodine eventually became one of the primary antibiotics. It was used orally as an antibiotic—it was used topically as an antibiotic. Still today, we do use iodine in surgical rooms. We use it to paint over surgical wounds and things like that to make sure that they don’t get infected.  
    Why Optimal Levels of Iodine Matters
    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects on growth and development, and is the most common cause of preventable mental retardation in the world. Iodine deficiency disorders result from inadequate thyroid hormone production secondary to insufficient iodine. During pregnancy and early infancy, iodine deficiency can cause irreversible effects. 10 Signs & Symptoms of an Iodine Deficiency
    Swelling in the Neck – Swelling in the front of the neck, or a goiter, is a common symptom of an iodine deficiency. It occurs when your thyroid gland is forced to make thyroid hormones when there is a low supply of iodine in the body. Unexpected Weight Gain – Low iodine levels may slow your metabolism and encourage food to be stored as fat, rather than be burned as energy. This may lead to weight gain. Fatigue and Weakness – Low iodine levels may leave you feeling tired, sluggish and weak. This is because your body needs the mineral to make energy. Hair Loss – An iodine deficiency may prevent hair follicles from regenerating. Fortunately, getting sufficient iodine can help correct hair loss that occurs due to an iodine deficiency. Dry, Flaky Skin – Dry, flaky skin may occur with an iodine deficiency, as the mineral helps your skin cells regenerate. It also helps your body sweat and hydrates your skin cells, so an iodine deficiency can cause you to sweat less. Feeling Colder Than Usual – Iodine helps generate body heat, so low levels of it may leave you feeling colder than usual. Changes in Heart Rate – An iodine deficiency may slow your heart rate, which may leave you feeling weak, fatigued, dizzy and at risk of fainting. Trouble Learning and Remembering – An iodine deficiency at any age may cause you to struggle to learn and remember things. One possible reason for this might be an underdeveloped brain. Problems During Pregnancy – Getting enough iodine is especially important for pregnant and breastfeeding women, as they have higher needs. An iodine deficiency may cause severe side effects, especially for the baby, such as stunted growth and brain development. Heavy or Irregular Periods –  Some women with an iodine deficiency may experience heavy or irregular periods. This is because low thyroid hormone levels may interfere with hormones that are involved in regulating the menstrual cycle.  
    Different Kinds/Sources of Iodine
     
    Salt
    The addition of iodine to the U.S. salt supply started in the 1920s in response to a government health ma

    • 29 min

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