14 min

Enhancing Strength and Stability in Athletes The Ask Mike Reinold Show

    • Medicine

I really feel to optimize movement and maximize performance, you need to work on both strength and dynamic stability.







But sometimes people need to focus on one more than the other.







Here’s how we try to integrate the two concepts with our patients and athletes.







To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







#AskMikeReinold Episode 273: Enhancing Strength and Stability in Athletes



















Listen and Subscribe to Podcast







You can use the player below to listen to the podcast or subscribe. If you are enjoying the podcast, PLEASE click here to leave us a review in iTunes, it will really mean a lot to us. THANKS!



















Show Notes







* Free course on the Introduction to Performance Therapy and Training















Transcript







Student:All right. We have Noah from Chicago. Chicago. He is asking after going through your Champion Performance Specialist program, I’ve learned that you advocate for working on both strength and stability to optimize performance in athletes. Can you give some examples of how you build programs in the gym that incorporate both?







Mike Reinold:I like that. Great question. Thank you, Noah from Chicago. Really good question. I think, for some reason with the strength and stability concept, some people are usually really good at one and maybe not so awesome at others. And to me, it’s just a lack of experience. You have to just understand and see that little bit, how they come together. So that’s a big thing that we do at Champion, and we talk about all the time is, is how we work on both strength and stability throughout the body. Right?







Mike Reinold:So it was funny, Diwesh and I were, I think we were just talking about this the other day, right. With some of our off season, like training programs, how to work on some of those stability things and stuff like that. So Dewey why don’t you start with that kind of concept. So we have somebody that obviously needs to build some strength, but we are a big believer here at Champion that we also have to work on how they control that strength, and optimizing their movement. So how do you work stability into people’s programs? And then maybe if you can even give some examples, I think that’d be great.







Diwesh Poudyal:Yeah, for sure. So for me, the first thing that I kind of start with is the needs analysis of the athlete. So inherently we got to figure out is, whatever sport or whatever activity this person does. Is it a little bit more biased towards needing to be super, super strong and powerful? Or is it maybe a little bit more required towards being stable? So I think that is going to help kind of figure out what do we have a little bit more of. And then from there, we start picking exercises that are going to be a little bit more biased towards one versus the other, after we’ve done that needs analysis. So for example, if we do a bilateral loaded squat, obviously that is going to be bilateral symmetrical, very stable position. So the focus there is going to be building strength.

I really feel to optimize movement and maximize performance, you need to work on both strength and dynamic stability.







But sometimes people need to focus on one more than the other.







Here’s how we try to integrate the two concepts with our patients and athletes.







To view more episodes, subscribe, and ask your questions, go to mikereinold.com/askmikereinold.







#AskMikeReinold Episode 273: Enhancing Strength and Stability in Athletes



















Listen and Subscribe to Podcast







You can use the player below to listen to the podcast or subscribe. If you are enjoying the podcast, PLEASE click here to leave us a review in iTunes, it will really mean a lot to us. THANKS!



















Show Notes







* Free course on the Introduction to Performance Therapy and Training















Transcript







Student:All right. We have Noah from Chicago. Chicago. He is asking after going through your Champion Performance Specialist program, I’ve learned that you advocate for working on both strength and stability to optimize performance in athletes. Can you give some examples of how you build programs in the gym that incorporate both?







Mike Reinold:I like that. Great question. Thank you, Noah from Chicago. Really good question. I think, for some reason with the strength and stability concept, some people are usually really good at one and maybe not so awesome at others. And to me, it’s just a lack of experience. You have to just understand and see that little bit, how they come together. So that’s a big thing that we do at Champion, and we talk about all the time is, is how we work on both strength and stability throughout the body. Right?







Mike Reinold:So it was funny, Diwesh and I were, I think we were just talking about this the other day, right. With some of our off season, like training programs, how to work on some of those stability things and stuff like that. So Dewey why don’t you start with that kind of concept. So we have somebody that obviously needs to build some strength, but we are a big believer here at Champion that we also have to work on how they control that strength, and optimizing their movement. So how do you work stability into people’s programs? And then maybe if you can even give some examples, I think that’d be great.







Diwesh Poudyal:Yeah, for sure. So for me, the first thing that I kind of start with is the needs analysis of the athlete. So inherently we got to figure out is, whatever sport or whatever activity this person does. Is it a little bit more biased towards needing to be super, super strong and powerful? Or is it maybe a little bit more required towards being stable? So I think that is going to help kind of figure out what do we have a little bit more of. And then from there, we start picking exercises that are going to be a little bit more biased towards one versus the other, after we’ve done that needs analysis. So for example, if we do a bilateral loaded squat, obviously that is going to be bilateral symmetrical, very stable position. So the focus there is going to be building strength.

14 min