Episode 23 - Influenza Diagnosis and Management in the Emergency Department EMplify by EB Medicine

    • Medicine

 
Jeff: Welcome back to Emplify, the podcast corollary to EB Medicine’s Emergency Medicine Practice. I’m Jeff Nusbaum, and I’m back with my co-host, Nachi Gupta. This month, we’re talking about a topic that is ripe for review this time of year. We’re talking Influenza… Diagnosis and Management.

Nachi: Very appropriate as the cold is settling in here in NYC and we’re already starting to see more cases of influenza. Remember that as you listen through the episode, the means we’re about to cover one of the CME questions for those of you listening at home with the print issue handy.

Jeff: This month’s issue was authored by Dr. Al Giwa of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Dr. Chinwe Ogedegbe of the Seton Hall School of Medicine, and Dr. Charles Murphy of Metrowest Medical Center.

Nachi: And this issue was peer reviewed by Dr. Michael Abraham of the University of Maryland School of Medicine and by Dr. Dan Egan, Vice Chair of Education of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Columbia University.

Jeff: The information contained in this article comes from articles found on pubmed, the cochrane database, center for disease control, and the world health organization. I’d say that’s a pretty reputable group of sources. Additionally, guidelines were reviewed from the american college of emergency physicians, infectious disease society of america, and the american academy of pediatrics.

Nachi: Some brief history here to get us started -- did you know that in 1918/1919, during the influenza pandemic, about one third of the world’s population was infected with influenza?

Jeff: That’s wild. How do they even know that?

Nachi: Not sure, but also worth noting -- an estimated 50 million people died during that pandemic.

Jeff: Clearly a deadly disease. Sadly, that wasn’t the last major outbreak… fifty years later the 1968 hong kong influenza pandemic, H3N2, took between 1 and 4 million lives.

Nachi: And just last year we saw the 2017-2018 influenza epidemic with record-breaking ED visits. This was the deadliest season since 1976 with at least 80,000 deaths.

Jeff: The reason for this is multifactorial. The combination of particularly mutagenic strains causing low vaccine effectiveness, along with decreased production of IV fluids and antiviral medication because of the hurricane, all played a role in last winter’s disastrous epidemic.

Nachi: Overall we’re looking at a rise in influenza related deaths with over 30,

 
Jeff: Welcome back to Emplify, the podcast corollary to EB Medicine’s Emergency Medicine Practice. I’m Jeff Nusbaum, and I’m back with my co-host, Nachi Gupta. This month, we’re talking about a topic that is ripe for review this time of year. We’re talking Influenza… Diagnosis and Management.

Nachi: Very appropriate as the cold is settling in here in NYC and we’re already starting to see more cases of influenza. Remember that as you listen through the episode, the means we’re about to cover one of the CME questions for those of you listening at home with the print issue handy.

Jeff: This month’s issue was authored by Dr. Al Giwa of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Dr. Chinwe Ogedegbe of the Seton Hall School of Medicine, and Dr. Charles Murphy of Metrowest Medical Center.

Nachi: And this issue was peer reviewed by Dr. Michael Abraham of the University of Maryland School of Medicine and by Dr. Dan Egan, Vice Chair of Education of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Columbia University.

Jeff: The information contained in this article comes from articles found on pubmed, the cochrane database, center for disease control, and the world health organization. I’d say that’s a pretty reputable group of sources. Additionally, guidelines were reviewed from the american college of emergency physicians, infectious disease society of america, and the american academy of pediatrics.

Nachi: Some brief history here to get us started -- did you know that in 1918/1919, during the influenza pandemic, about one third of the world’s population was infected with influenza?

Jeff: That’s wild. How do they even know that?

Nachi: Not sure, but also worth noting -- an estimated 50 million people died during that pandemic.

Jeff: Clearly a deadly disease. Sadly, that wasn’t the last major outbreak… fifty years later the 1968 hong kong influenza pandemic, H3N2, took between 1 and 4 million lives.

Nachi: And just last year we saw the 2017-2018 influenza epidemic with record-breaking ED visits. This was the deadliest season since 1976 with at least 80,000 deaths.

Jeff: The reason for this is multifactorial. The combination of particularly mutagenic strains causing low vaccine effectiveness, along with decreased production of IV fluids and antiviral medication because of the hurricane, all played a role in last winter’s disastrous epidemic.

Nachi: Overall we’re looking at a rise in influenza related deaths with over 30,