1 hr 17 min

Episode 8: Susan Notess: Listening, silencing, gaslighting and honesty Generous Questions

    • Philosophy

Susan suggested a bunch of things to read about the philosophy and ethics of listening, for you to follow up:



Talk: The science of conversation by Elizabeth Stokoe
Yo! And Lo! The Pragmatic Topography of the Space of Reasons by Mark Lance and Rebecca Kukla
Dotson, Kristie. "Tracking Epistemic Violence, Tracking Practices of Silencing", Hypatia 26.2 (2011): 236-257. [link to .pdf]
Medina, José. "Varieties of Hermeneutical Injustice 1." The Routledge Handbook of Epistemic Injustice. Routledge, 2017. 41-52.


And here are some other things for you to explore that came up in our conversation:



I mentioned the following book at one point: Solnit, Rebecca. Hope in the dark: The untold history of people power. Canongate Books, 2010.
Susan talked a bit about the ethical work done by Elizabeth Edenberg, which emphasises how participants to discussions often have a wide range of commonly held values.
She also mentioned a Horizon-2020 research project at the University of Manchester that looks into youth radicalisation: it's called the Dialogue about Radicalisation and Equality, or DARE.
I mentioned the 'deep listening' programme of composer Pauline Oliveros. A great introduction to her work can be found on this episode of WQXR Q2's awesome 'Meet The Composer' series with host Nadia Sirota here. A performance of Oliveros' 'Tuning Mediation' can be seen in 360º video recorded in binaural sound here.
In this regard, Susan also mentioned the following work: Cavarero, Adriana. For more than one voice: Toward a philosophy of vocal expression. Stanford University Press, 2005.


You can find Susan online on twitter (@susannotess), and her academic webpage is here, where you can find links to her work, including this excellent article:



Listening to People: Using Social Psychology to Spotlight an Overlooked Virtue. Philosophy, 94(4), 621-643.


As ever, please get in touch to send any thoughts, responses, ideas, reactions, feedback or ideas about this episode or any of the others, it's always great to hear from you, particularly if you want to say encouraging things. To drop me a line you can just head over to the contact page, or tweet at me on twitter (@drjoemorrison)


The theme music is from li_serios05 by TVO on Broken20 records under Creative Commons license BY-NC-SA.

Susan suggested a bunch of things to read about the philosophy and ethics of listening, for you to follow up:



Talk: The science of conversation by Elizabeth Stokoe
Yo! And Lo! The Pragmatic Topography of the Space of Reasons by Mark Lance and Rebecca Kukla
Dotson, Kristie. "Tracking Epistemic Violence, Tracking Practices of Silencing", Hypatia 26.2 (2011): 236-257. [link to .pdf]
Medina, José. "Varieties of Hermeneutical Injustice 1." The Routledge Handbook of Epistemic Injustice. Routledge, 2017. 41-52.


And here are some other things for you to explore that came up in our conversation:



I mentioned the following book at one point: Solnit, Rebecca. Hope in the dark: The untold history of people power. Canongate Books, 2010.
Susan talked a bit about the ethical work done by Elizabeth Edenberg, which emphasises how participants to discussions often have a wide range of commonly held values.
She also mentioned a Horizon-2020 research project at the University of Manchester that looks into youth radicalisation: it's called the Dialogue about Radicalisation and Equality, or DARE.
I mentioned the 'deep listening' programme of composer Pauline Oliveros. A great introduction to her work can be found on this episode of WQXR Q2's awesome 'Meet The Composer' series with host Nadia Sirota here. A performance of Oliveros' 'Tuning Mediation' can be seen in 360º video recorded in binaural sound here.
In this regard, Susan also mentioned the following work: Cavarero, Adriana. For more than one voice: Toward a philosophy of vocal expression. Stanford University Press, 2005.


You can find Susan online on twitter (@susannotess), and her academic webpage is here, where you can find links to her work, including this excellent article:



Listening to People: Using Social Psychology to Spotlight an Overlooked Virtue. Philosophy, 94(4), 621-643.


As ever, please get in touch to send any thoughts, responses, ideas, reactions, feedback or ideas about this episode or any of the others, it's always great to hear from you, particularly if you want to say encouraging things. To drop me a line you can just head over to the contact page, or tweet at me on twitter (@drjoemorrison)


The theme music is from li_serios05 by TVO on Broken20 records under Creative Commons license BY-NC-SA.

1 hr 17 min

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