21 episodes

After several months of pre-trip planning and meetings, students travel to New Orleans, Louisiana to examine first hand the on-going disruptions to daily life and the lingering impacts of poor coastal resource management. We will spend the first two days touring around the greater New Orleans region. Our travels initially focus on the drivers of wetland loss and historic mismanagement of the Mississippi River delta by the Army Corps of Engineers, local levee boards, etc. The next phase of our trip will find us conducting environmental impact assessments and wetland restoration projects in Belle Chase’s Woodlands Trail and Park (one of the few remnant bottomland hardwood forests surrounding Greater New Orleans). Next we will transition into an examination of the cultural landscape of southern Louisiana, including introductions to the literary, musical, and culinary traditions of the region. Guest speakers and guides will come from Tulane University, Louisiana State University, the United States Geological Survey, the New Orleans Mayor's Office, New Orleans Food and Farm Network, etc. The final and largest phase of our trip is devoted to helping rebuild human infrastructure. In the previous years, we have focused on rebuilding affordable housing and community centers. This year will see us transitioning to designing and installing community food gardens during this last part of our trip to add sustainable and affordable food supplies for the residents of Buras (Plaquemines Parish) and New Orleans. We are quite excited about our shift into food accessibility. Rather than returning areas to pre-Katrina conditions, this local-grown, healthy food movement we are embracing is an effort to recover the food traditions of coastal Louisiana. Local, small scale farming (now termed “microagriculture”) thrived more than a century ago throughout the region, but has been culturally and institutionally de-emphasized in recent decades. As with our wetland work, we hope to contribute in some small way to the recovery of the land, people, and cultural vibrancy of coastal Louisiana.

ESRM 492 - Service Learning in New Orleans CSU Channel Islands

    • Science

After several months of pre-trip planning and meetings, students travel to New Orleans, Louisiana to examine first hand the on-going disruptions to daily life and the lingering impacts of poor coastal resource management. We will spend the first two days touring around the greater New Orleans region. Our travels initially focus on the drivers of wetland loss and historic mismanagement of the Mississippi River delta by the Army Corps of Engineers, local levee boards, etc. The next phase of our trip will find us conducting environmental impact assessments and wetland restoration projects in Belle Chase’s Woodlands Trail and Park (one of the few remnant bottomland hardwood forests surrounding Greater New Orleans). Next we will transition into an examination of the cultural landscape of southern Louisiana, including introductions to the literary, musical, and culinary traditions of the region. Guest speakers and guides will come from Tulane University, Louisiana State University, the United States Geological Survey, the New Orleans Mayor's Office, New Orleans Food and Farm Network, etc. The final and largest phase of our trip is devoted to helping rebuild human infrastructure. In the previous years, we have focused on rebuilding affordable housing and community centers. This year will see us transitioning to designing and installing community food gardens during this last part of our trip to add sustainable and affordable food supplies for the residents of Buras (Plaquemines Parish) and New Orleans. We are quite excited about our shift into food accessibility. Rather than returning areas to pre-Katrina conditions, this local-grown, healthy food movement we are embracing is an effort to recover the food traditions of coastal Louisiana. Local, small scale farming (now termed “microagriculture”) thrived more than a century ago throughout the region, but has been culturally and institutionally de-emphasized in recent decades. As with our wetland work, we hope to contribute in some small way to the recovery of the land, people, and cultural vibrancy of coastal Louisiana.

    • video
    Hurricane Katrina Introduction

    Hurricane Katrina Introduction

    This is an introduction to Hurricane Katrina. In this lecture we begin to set-up the context for this natural disaster.

    • 45 min
    • video
    New Orleans Culture

    New Orleans Culture

    This is a brief overview of Louisiana and New Orleans culture. This class was also our first joint CSUCI-Oregon State University video conference.

    • 44 min
    • video
    Hurricane Katrina's Aftermath (partial)

    Hurricane Katrina's Aftermath (partial)

    This is a continuation of our introduction to the impacts of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

    • 1 hr 5 min
    • video
    Levee-ing Fate pt1-Introduction

    Levee-ing Fate pt1-Introduction

    This is my overview lecture that sets the stage for the rest of our New Orleans course. I have broken it up into several segments for easier downloading.

    • 13 min
    • video
    Levee-ing Fate pt2-Context

    Levee-ing Fate pt2-Context

    This is my overview lecture that sets the stage for the rest of our New Orleans course. I have broken it up into several segments for easier downloading.

    • 26 min
    • video
    Levee-ing Fate pt3-Hurricane Katrina (large file)

    Levee-ing Fate pt3-Hurricane Katrina (large file)

    • 24 min

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