75 episodes

Socrates said that talking about virtue and the good life is one of the most important things a human being can do. That's where "Ethics-Talk" fits in. Born in 2009 in the Department of Philosophy & Religion at Central Michigan University (Mt. Pleasant, Michigan), the Ethics-Talk network now spans 3 continents. To learn more, visit us at http://www.ethicstalk.org and on twitter at http://www.twitter.com/ethicstalk

Ethics-Talk: The Greatest Good of Man is Daily to Converse About Virtue Ethics-Talk

    • Philosophy
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Socrates said that talking about virtue and the good life is one of the most important things a human being can do. That's where "Ethics-Talk" fits in. Born in 2009 in the Department of Philosophy & Religion at Central Michigan University (Mt. Pleasant, Michigan), the Ethics-Talk network now spans 3 continents. To learn more, visit us at http://www.ethicstalk.org and on twitter at http://www.twitter.com/ethicstalk

    The Duty to Remember and The Right to Know: How Newk and Evelyn Grubb built a Community of Memory

    The Duty to Remember and The Right to Know: How Newk and Evelyn Grubb built a Community of Memory

    This show continues our series connecting the Duty to Remember and the Ethics of Memory to the issue of Prisoners of War/Missing in Action (POW/MIA). We begin this show with a photo of Wilmer Newlin “Newk” Grubb, an American Pilot who was shot down in North Vietnam in 1966 and died shortly after becoming a POW. Clearly alive in the photo (taken in 1966), and being tended to by a nurse, the photo was promoted by the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (DRV), and published in U.S. papers. Eventually, Newk’s wife Evelyn learned of the photo, who until that time, was uncertain of his fate. Upon seeing the photo, Evelyn’s life – and that of her 4 sons – was changed forever. Learn about this powerful story as Kevyn Settle, director and producer of a relevant documentary film called “Fruits of Peace”, and Jeff Grubb, the eldest one son of Newk and Evelyn Grubb, discuss the events surrounding the photo both in Vietnam and in the United States.

    The Duty to Remember: Journeys of Reconciliation and The Fruits of Peace

    The Duty to Remember: Journeys of Reconciliation and The Fruits of Peace

    This show continues our series devoted connecting the Duty to Remember and the Ethics of Memory to the issue of Prisoners of War/Missing in Action (POW/MIA). Joining us is the talented team behind "Fruits of Peace" a 2019 documentary film that focuses on the reconciliatory journey of Du Pham, a Vietnamese National, who fought for the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam) during the Vietnam War. Du belongs to the celebrated anti-aircraft unit "C4" which, as its first victory, shot down American Pilot Wilmer Newlin "Newk" Grubb in 1966. Surviving the attack on his plane, Newk was taken to a local village and fed, and then presumably transported to a camp holding other Prisoners of War. Newk died in captivity shortly thereafter. Du just assumed that Newk had survived and was released when the other Prisoners of War were returned to the United States during Operation Homecoming in 1973. Over 40 years later, in 2010, Du journeyed to the U.S. in part to visit his brother Mai (who fought for the South) and to find Newk. Join us to learn about the incredible unfolding of events triggered by Du's courageous decision to extend his hand to his former "enemy", as told in "Fruits of Peace." Joining us are Kevyn Settle (Producer, Director), Michael Chiplock (Executive Producer) and Shirine Hossaini (Associate Producer) of this moving film that raises profound and poignant questions about the Duty to Remember, the Ethics of Memory and how journeys of reconciliation help to harvest the fruits of peace.

    The Duty to Remember: Considering Prisoners of War and The Missing in Action (POW/MIA) as a Case Study in the Ethics of Memory

    The Duty to Remember: Considering Prisoners of War and The Missing in Action (POW/MIA) as a Case Study in the Ethics of Memory

    In his book “The Ethics of Memory”(Harvard 2004) philosopher Avishai Margalit argues that although we have a duty to remember others, the nature of those duties shifts depending on our specific relationship to “the other”. We have a duty to remember friends and family, but that duty is weaker and even non-existent if the other is a stranger. In today’s show, we use the issue of Prisoners of War/Missing in Action (POW/MIA) to reflect on Margalit’s theory and other moral questions connected to our duties to the Missing, to the dead, and to their families. The familiar POW/MIA flag (created during the Vietnam War) states “You are Not Forgotten,” betokening a moral duty to remember. September 18, 2020 was National POW/MIA Recognition Day and this show is the first in a series in which we engage in an extended discussion of Prisoners of War/Missing in Action (POW/MIA) and their families. Joining us is documentary filmmaker Kevyn Settle who has done extensive research on the POW/MIA issue and has recently made a moving film, Fruits of Peace, that includes the story of how the Vietnam War helped shape our Duty to Remember.

    Justice, Impartiality and Peace: From Andrew Carnegie to John Lewis

    Justice, Impartiality and Peace: From Andrew Carnegie to John Lewis

    This show continues our discussion on 9/03, which explored the connections amongst peace, justice and the Golden Rule. We continue discussing the relationship amongst these concepts, focusing today on the connection between impartiality and justice - a connection which Andrew Carnegie observed in 1907. According to Carnegie, justice “forbids men to be judges when they are parties to the issue”. Yet, Immanuel Kant seems to posit existence of an inescapable “inner judge” which can, impartially, judge the extent to which one is complying with the moral law. In today’s show we explore these apparent contradictory claims and the relationship amongst justice, impartiality and peace, using the remarks of John Lewis (1940-2020) to guide us in this dialogue.

    From the Golden Rule to The Freedom Rides: Reflecting on Peace and Justice

    From the Golden Rule to The Freedom Rides: Reflecting on Peace and Justice

    This show continues our discussion on 8/27, which focused on the role of visual objects in the Peace through Law movement. Discussing both the peace flag (created in 1897) and the Peace Palace, which opened in 1913, we noted how both play important roles in the "education piece" of the Peace through Law movement. These symbols not only provide a way of "entering the forest" of the history of this movement, but also help the individual to organize his or her "inner world" so that one acts in accordance with an "inner law" known as Golden Rule. We continue this discussion and connect it to the issue of “Justice.” What is the relationship between peace and justice? August 28, we noted, is both the anniversary of Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech, and the opening of the Peace Palace. We thus devote this show to exploring the connections amongst the Peace through Law Movement, the Golden Rule, the nature of Justice and the non-violent wing of the Civil Rights Movement, noting that this is the first year that we have passed through August 28, without Congressman John Lewis, a fierce practitioner of the philosophy of non-violence and the last survivor of the original "big 6" behind the March on Washington on August 28, 1963

    Organizing for Memory, Visualizing Peace, Reflecting on Justice

    Organizing for Memory, Visualizing Peace, Reflecting on Justice

    This show marks two distinct but linked moments in peace history connected to the work of visualizing and concretizing the peace ideal that was(is) an important part of the “Peace through Law” Movement. August 27 marks the adoption of the International Flag of Peace by the Universal Peace Union (in 1897); it also marks the eve of the opening of the Peace Palace in The Hague (on August 28, 1913). In this show, we discuss the deeper roots of these moments that are part of the “visual history” of the Peace through Law Movement, and how both the Peace Flag and the Peace Palace play important roles in “organizing the world”, and the individual, for peace. We also discuss the mysterious linkages amongst the Peace through Law Movement, the women’s suffrage movement and the U.S. civil rights movement.

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