103 episodes

"Everyday Conversations Race for Everyday People," brings people together for cross-race conversations on race. If you have ever wanted to have a conversation about race, then this podcast is for you.Our mission is to disrupt the way race is talked about, break racial silos and have a global impact on how people see each other.

We have from different backgrounds who share stories, thoughts on race, perspective on current social issues and pop culture happenings. We show that conversations about race are possible, urgent and essential for survival.

Guests are all ages from very young to very old, immigrants, students, formerly incarcerated, executives, hourly employees, social activists, hip-hop artists, athletes and media. It’s serious, funny and insightful.

We have a global mission for these conversations, to eliminate fear of differences, bring people together in the same space, and find surprising connections.

Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People Simma Lieberman

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 25 Ratings

"Everyday Conversations Race for Everyday People," brings people together for cross-race conversations on race. If you have ever wanted to have a conversation about race, then this podcast is for you.Our mission is to disrupt the way race is talked about, break racial silos and have a global impact on how people see each other.

We have from different backgrounds who share stories, thoughts on race, perspective on current social issues and pop culture happenings. We show that conversations about race are possible, urgent and essential for survival.

Guests are all ages from very young to very old, immigrants, students, formerly incarcerated, executives, hourly employees, social activists, hip-hop artists, athletes and media. It’s serious, funny and insightful.

We have a global mission for these conversations, to eliminate fear of differences, bring people together in the same space, and find surprising connections.

    From Harlem to Harvard: How Dorien Nuñez Tackled the Racial Wealth Disparity

    From Harlem to Harvard: How Dorien Nuñez Tackled the Racial Wealth Disparity

     
    Dorien Nuñez is a New York City native, amateur astronomer, and former professional Sax player. He has celebrated 50 years on Wall Street, is a first generation college grad from Harvard, and is a proud alum of the New York City public school system. He is a co-founder of a group of Harvard Black and Latinx alumni serving on corporate boards, and is a Senior Fellow at Intentional Endowments Network.
     
    Dorien Nuñez’s journey to understanding the racial wealth disparity began in his childhood, growing up in Brooklyn but attending an elite mostly White high school in the suburbs. He was inspired by the achievements of people like Benjamin Banneker, and had mentors like his schoolteachers, who helped him develop his talents. At a young age, he began to understand the importance of money and developed entrepreneurial skills. With the help of his mentors, he was accepted to prestigious boarding schools and eventually Harvard Business School. His experiences gave him the insight to understand the systemic issues in capitalism and banking, leading him to dedicate his career to helping others to invest and create wealth. With his commitment to mentorship, Dorien Nuñez is helping to close the racial wealth gap and empower people to create and achieve unlimited success.
    1. Exploring the economic disparities between white and black people in the US.
    2. Investigating the role of mentors and how they help individuals succeed.
    3. Decoding the secrets to becoming a millionaire by investing wisely.
     
     
    Chapter Summaries:
     
    [00:03:21]
    The wealth disparity between black and white people. What does it mean when we talk about generational wealth?
     
    [00:08:47]
    Dorien was born in Harlem and then moved to Brooklyn. Got a scholarship to go to an elite white boarding school, St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire. His first mentors were his school teachers. Ended up going to Harvard Business School.
     
    [00:14:55]
    When he was nine years old, he saw an article about the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His mentors saw something in him and nurtured it. This leads him to try to find and mentor high school students and college students.
     
    [00:17:32]
    As a child, he was entrepreneurial. "The hardest job to get on Wall Street is your first job." His advice to anybody out there is to learn about money. You can't get rich if you don't know about money.
     
    [00:23:53]
    Credit scores are important and people can raise their credit scores. All kinds of free services will help you repair your credit. More and more entities are providing capital to people with lower credit scores. Things are getting easier and better, but you still have to take responsibility and get your budget in order.
     
    [00:31:10]
    "Well, when I went away to boarding school, it was practically all mostly white boarding school. I was there to get a good education, to learn what I could, and to take it back home. That was my mission. At age 14, I knew what I was going to do."
     
    [00:31:40]
    "The House of Representatives kept Adam Clayton Powell from taking his seat. So if they wanted to, they could keep George Santos in his seat. And in California, they recalled Governor Davis." "We'll send any listeners to this show, who calls in or sends Simma an email a free report on "Ten Things You Could Do To Save Money and Invest and Three Things You Can Teach Your Children."
     
    [00:34:11]
    The term Redlining comes from when the banks or insurance company would draw a red line around the neighborhood. They would not loan money to people in Black neighborhoods or sell houses to Black people to move into white neighborhoods. Redlining is not as obvious as it has been in the past, but it still exists and it's an impediment. The only solution is to sue them when this happens. You got to make them pay economically.
     
    [00:36:40]
    Dorien's experience with race and racism. How they were treated differently and that being black is not that easy.
     
    [00:44:

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Unraveling Racial History: Benjamin Jealous's Quest for Freedom

    Unraveling Racial History: Benjamin Jealous's Quest for Freedom

    After a DNA test reveals he is a descendant of both Robert E. Lee and a former slave, Benjamin Jealous embarks on a Wild Ride to uncover the truth about the oldest open wound in America and the possibility of bridging the divide between black and white
    Benjamin Jealous is ouir guest on this episode of Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People. He is a former president of the NAACP, a civil rights activist, and an author. He is the author of the book, "Never Forget: Our People Were Always Free," which explores racism, the history of the United States, and the power of storytelling.
     
    In this episode, you will learn the following:
     
    1. How is racism still affecting our country today?
    2. What can we do to bridge the divide between different groups of people?
    3. How did the concept of race originate and how has it been used to divide us?
     
    Chapter Summaries:
    [00:25]
     The book is about the oldest open wound in this country, the wound of racism. Author wrote it as a series of speeches, or monologues to his computer. The book is a very conversational book, a book a lot of people find surprisingly funny.
     
    [09:38]
     Richard Yates Bland was the last white Bland to own my family. Robert Lee was the leader of the black Republicans in Virginia. What gives a slave man hubris to lead entire political parties?
     
    [18:23]
     The title comes from something that we believe was first said by our female Kunta Kente of our family if you will. Never forget, our people were always free. That's what all the women in Atlanta I've ever known of were rebellious. And that's what put the steel in their spine.
     
    [28:17]
     Dr. King was trying to bring poor white folks and poor black folks together to build a better America. The ultimate purpose of racism is to divide these two groups so they can't assert their right to get out of poverty. The media should show the real face of poverty, which is black and white and brown and Asian.
     
    Guest Bio
    Ben Jealous, is the youngest-ever person to have been elected as the national NAACP President; was just named the Sierra Club's Executive Director (the first person of color selected for the post), and is also a University of Pennsylvania, Professor of Practice. Timed for Black History Month, his new book just hit #1 in the African-American biographies category on Amazon. While researching the book, Jealous learned he is a cousin to slave owner Thomas Jefferson, confederate Robert E. Lee; AND a distant cousin of Dick Cheney! The book is dedicated to his grandmother who taught him to ’never forget our people were always free,’ which he considers his personal mantra of inspiration—hoping that we all: White/Black, Democrat/Republican—can finally join together to snuff out race; which Jealous says was not what our country was built on in the first place.
     
    Host Bio
    Simma Lieberman, The Inclusionist helps leaders create inclusive cultures. She is a consultant, speaker and facilitator and the host of the podcast, “Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People.”
    Contact Simma@SimmaLieberman.com
    Go to www.simmalieberman.com and www.raceconvo.com for more information
    Simma is a member of and inspired by the global organization IAC (Inclusion Allies Coalition)

    • 34 min
    Navigating Racism and Inclusion with Greg Jenkins, Nirupa Netram, and Elinor Stutz

    Navigating Racism and Inclusion with Greg Jenkins, Nirupa Netram, and Elinor Stutz

    When Greg Jenkins, Nirupa Netram, and Elinor Stutz, three colleagues and members of the Inclusion Allies Coalition, come together to discuss the importance of talking about race, they are confronted with their own diverse backgrounds, a goal to support those impacted by racism, and a central conflict between silence and open dialogue.
     
    "It is important for us to understand that race is a very Western idea, but in the context of those parts of the world where race is an understood terminology to understand the effects of race and racism is important for us to, in the case of the IAC, help us understand people that are suffering because of the negative impacts of racism." - Greg Jenkins
    Greg Jenkins is an older, white, straight male of Catholic upbringing who spent 28 years in the US Army and has been a diversity, equity, and inclusion consultant for the last 17 years. Nirupa Netram is an attorney and consultant of Indian descent and Hindu faith. Elinor Stutz is a Jewish woman, a best selling author, and the founder of Smooth Sale,
    Greg, Nirupa, and Elinor, along with Simma, are colleagues and members of the Inclusion Allies Coalition. Each of them has a different cultural background and provides their own perspective on the importance of talking about race and the value of the Inclusion Allies Coalition. Elinor shares the story of her family's experience and her own experience in corporate. They explain why it is important to have conversations about race, speak out against racism and stand together with people who are different. The Inclusion Allies Coalition provides a safe space for entry into conversations about diversity, equity, and inclusion, and a way to connect with people from all around the world.
     
    The Inclusion Allies Coalition brought together three colleagues and friends with a variety of cultural backgrounds. They discussed the importance of having conversations about race and the value of those conversations.
    In this episode, you will learn the answers to the following:
    How does being a member of the Inclusion Allies Coalition promote diversity, equity, and inclusion? What challenges have been experienced by those who have been negatively impacted by racism? How can people become more open to learning from those who are different?  
    Key Topics:
    [00:45]
    Three members of the Inclusion Allies Coalition appear on this week's podcast. Each person will give you two minutes, two sentences about themselves. They will give their name, their cultural background.
    [03:09]
    “Why do you think it's important to talk about race today?”
     We can't have silence now because you're going to call on us. Why is it an important conversation? Well, these are discussions that are happening globally in response to so many issues.
     
    [04:48]
    Elinor Stutz was raised not to talk about being Jewish because her family were holocaust surivors. She says antisemitism is on the rise and so is racism. It's important for groups to stand together and to really speak out together.
     
    [09:02]
    The Inclusion Allies Coalition brings together people from all over the world. They are  advocates for people that may be suffering, or negatively impacted by the topics that we're referring to here.
    Greg finds value in networking with other colleagues that are trying to do good things in their world.
    [11:09]
    Being an IAC member allows you to gain access to global practitioners who support and take action to build inclusion.
    Elinor shares what it means to her to meet so many people who diverse in so many ways.
    [19:24]
    When Elinor was growing up, her grammar was half English and half Yiddish. She felt weird all the time. People always told her she was weird.
    [22:23]
    Nirupa: “I was very lucky growing up. It wasn't until I moved to the US that I began to experience the negative aspects of race and racism.” She says she would walk into stores and be ignored or looked at a certain way. Nirupa believes people are fundamenta

    • 50 min
    Black Fatigue with Mary Frances Winters

    Black Fatigue with Mary Frances Winters

    Mary Frances Winters, one of the original thought leaders in the diversity field and cross-race conversations, joins me in this conversation on race.
     
    We talk about:
    How the histories of Black and other people of color are being replaced in the USA How we need to look at race and racism from a systemic point of view and not just look at individual actions The state of the diversity conversation at work  
    Key topics:
    [2:06] Why it’s important to talk about race, and why people are reluctant to talk about it
     
    [4:54] Her new book, “Racial Justice at Work”
     
    [8:25] How we all swim in the water of white supremacy
     
    [10:25] The way history of people from non-dominant groups is being wiped out
    Example: Florida banning diversity training, and Don’t say gay bills
    [14:53] When will teaching history of slavery be forbidden in public schools
    [16:51] The fear that this country is becoming too Black or Brown and will have too much political clout that drives white supremacy
    [21:15] The difficulty of discussing the topic of race at work
    [23:47] Self-loathing and internalized oppression
    [25:16] When Mary Frances was called the N-word at the age of five and the reaction from her parents
    [29:02] The real history and current state of diversity, (equity and inclusion) today
    [32:02] Why Mary Frances is not a fan of adding more letters to Diversity, Equity and Inclusion
    [34:17] How some people who are not qualified are being asked to be diversity leaders just because they belong to a dimension of diversity
    Why do some people take on the role without the requisite expertise?
    [40:35] What is generational wealth? What is informational wealth?
    [46:42] The biggest challenge Mary Frances has seen from white women
     
    Guest Bio
    Mary Frances Winters is President and CEO of The Winters Group, Inc., a 38-year-old diversity and inclusion consulting firm, and the author of six books, including her best seller, We Can't Talk about That at Work!: How to Talk about Race, Religion, Politics, and Other Polarizing Topics; and her two latest books, Inclusive Conversations: Fostering Equity, Empathy, and Belonging Across Differences and Black Fatigue: How Racism Erodes the Mind, Body, and Spirit.
    Learn More About The Winters Group on their website, here.
    Follow Mary-Frances on LinkedIn.
    Follow The Winters Group on Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.
    Host Bio
    Simma Lieberman, The Inclusionist helps leaders create inclusive cultures. She is a consultant, speaker and facilitator and the host of the podcast, “Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People.”
    Contact Simma@SimmaLieberman.com
    Go to www.simmalieberman.com and www.raceconvo.com for more information
    Simma is a member of and inspired by the global organization IAC (Inclusion Allies Coalition)

    • 56 min
    Kamau Bell and Kate Schatz; Do the Anti-Racist Work

    Kamau Bell and Kate Schatz; Do the Anti-Racist Work

    In this Conversation on Race, Kamau Bell and Kate Schatz join me to talk about race, racism, and their new book they co-authored, “Do The Work, An Anti-Racist Workbook. Kate Schatz, author, activist, and public speaker. 
     
    Kamau Bell is a well-known author, comedian, and political commentator on CNN.
    Kate Schatz, is a feminist author, activist, and public speaker. 
    (Because of their schedules, I had to interview each one separately)
     
    Key topics with Kamau Bell
    What made Kamau Bell and Kate Schatz write “Do The Work, An Anti-Racist Workbook,” together.
    What happens after people buy anti-racism books, they often do nothing.
    How white racists went after the success of Black people after slavery and tried to destroy them.
    Why Black people are justified in being afraid of being stopped by police at a traffic stop.
    Why when people say they don’t have a racist bone, it means they are racist.
    A big list of small actions you can take. 
    How you can help create a non-racist society.
    Educate kids to prepare for the world.
    Why you should buy “Do The Work, An Anti-Racist workbook.
     
    Key topics with Kate Schatz 
    Her first experience with race, and speaking up against racism to a group of white parents at a high school meeting. 
    How her friends supported her anti-racism. 
    how she keeps talking about white supremacy when she is told to stop.
    Explaining white supremacy so other white people can understand it.
    Ways in which the USA was founded on white supremacist beliefs.
    What people can do to eliminate white supremacist beliefs?
    Anti-racist actions everyone can take.
     
    Guests Bio
     
    W. Kamau Bell is a stand-up comedian and the director and executive producer of the four-part Showtime documentary, We Need To Talk About Cosby, which premiered at Sundance. He also hosts and executive-produces the Emmy Award winning CNN docu-series United Shades of America with W. Kamau Bell. His new book, Do The Work: An Antiracist Activity Book, co-written with Kate Schatz, is forthcoming from Workman in July. 
    http://www.wkamaubell.com/about
     
    Link to book
    https://www.workman.com/products/do-the-work/paperback
    https://www.amazon.com/Do-Work-Antiracist-Activity-Book/dp/1523514280
     
    KATE SCHATZ is an author, activist, public speaker, educator, consultant, and queer feminist mama who's been talking, writing, and teaching about race, gender, social justice, and equity for many years. She's the New York Times bestselling author of the "Rad Women" book series (including Rad American Women A-Z, Rad Women Worldwide, and Rad American History A-Z), which have sold over 300,000 copies and been translated into four languages. Her book of fiction, Rid of Me: A Story, was published in 2007 as part of the cult-favorite 33 ⅓ series. She is the co-author of Do the Work: An Anti-Racist Activity Book, with W. Kamau Bell, the comedian and Emmy-winning host of CNN’s United Shades of America.
    www.KateSchatz.com
     
    Host Bio
    Simma Lieberman, The Inclusionist helps leaders create inclusive cultures. She is a consultant, speaker and facilitator and the host of the podcast, “Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People.”
    Contact Simma@SimmaLieberman.com
    Go to www.simmalieberman.com and www.raceconvo.com for more information
    Simma is a member of and inspired by the global organization IAC (Inclusion Allies Coalition)

    • 26 min
    Conversation on Race with Marcus Sawyerr

    Conversation on Race with Marcus Sawyerr

    Marcus Sawyerr, CEO of EQ Community joins me in this conversation on race. We talk about how he and EQ Community help Black and other People of Color who have been historically excluded from professional opportunities.
    He shares his experience as a Black man in the UK, and  how he came to the US and founded EQ Community.
     
    Key Topics include:
     
    [4:16] Why it’s important for Black people to have access to business opportunities, and ways to get those opportunities.
    [5:14] Why access to information is crucial, and how lack of access has resulted in exclusion for Black and other people of color.
    [12:07]- Why and how he founded EQ Community.
    How Marcus Sawyerr and EQ Community help People of Color get access to top jobs and opportunities instead of languishing in search firms
    [14:00] How people in EQ Community get and give support to each other to excel
    [15:39] Why and how Black and Brown people are underutilized even after they get hired
    [16:38] Is exclusion a Black and White thing, is it an organizational DNA thing? A race thing?
    [23:10] How Diversity and Inclusion is a superpower
    [27:01] The difference between being a black man in the UK vs being a Black man in the US.
    [30:22] How the system in the US is set up for People of Color not to win and how to change that.
     
    Guest Bio
    British-born CEO Marcus Sawyerr is founder of EQ Community, was an executive board member to Microsoft, former Head of Global Partnerships at The Adecco Group in Switzerland, and Senior Director at CareerBuilder. 
    His latest tech platform is a unique online community that’s cultivating and connecting multicultural professionals interested in tech— accelerating diverse and inclusive executive recruitment, globally.
    He can speak to timely topics, as:
    -Hiring Trends across Tech in DE&I Metaverse 
    -How Web3 and decentralization will impact future of work
    -DEI program best practices for a winning team
    - Myth-busting the big lie about “lowering the bar“ to attain inclusive hiring and diverse workforce
    - The power and impact of inclusion and equitable recruiting
    - The importance of developing nuanced and strategic approach to implementing diverse hiring panels
    - And how to structure, implement, measure, and sustain equitable and inclusive attraction and selection practices
    Lastly, Marcus is featured in publications: Insight, The EQ Report, American Express, Recruiter.com, LinkedIn, and Inside Big Data.
    Host Bio:
    Simma Lieberman, The Inclusionist helps leaders create inclusive cultures. She is a consultant, speaker and facilitator and the host of the podcast, “Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People.”
    Contact Simma@SimmaLieberman.com
    Go to www.simmalieberman.com and www.raceconvo.com for more information
    Simma is a member of and inspired by the global organization IAC (Inclusion Allies Coalition) 

    • 54 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
25 Ratings

25 Ratings

Bicoastal Fashionista ,

Fabulous show

This podcast is so wonderful. Simma has a great gift for becoming a true affirmer of each guest, so that hard topics are made available, defenses are down, doors of understanding are opened and a way for true conversation to take place is modeled. You will learn about so much cool stuff too!
Simma also facilitates conversations in the workplace to create doors where walls exist, and I can only imagine these are life changing for the corporate culture. Really...do yourself a favor and tune in,

Logo17 ,

Amazing SHOW

I love the tactical, honest and real rawness Simma delivers in this podcast. I hit subscribe and definitely can’t wait for the next show!!!

Tom Antion ,

Finally No Screaming

I'm thrilled to be able to listen to a podcast on this sensitive topic where people are actually discussing and debating without screaming at each other. Great work Simma!

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