86 episodes

Have you ever been talking with other surgeons about the way they do things in their practice and you heard something that helped you out? This podcast is meant to give you an insight into the way other surgeons do things with the hopes of helping you improve your own method. Sometimes small changes can make a big difference in your daily routine.

Everyday Oral Surgery: Surgeons Talking Shop Grant Stucki - oral and maxillofacial surgeon

    • Education
    • 4.9 • 51 Ratings

Have you ever been talking with other surgeons about the way they do things in their practice and you heard something that helped you out? This podcast is meant to give you an insight into the way other surgeons do things with the hopes of helping you improve your own method. Sometimes small changes can make a big difference in your daily routine.

    Dr. Dan Hammer: Experience as a Single Degree, Fellowship Trained, Head and Neck Surgeon in the Armed Forces

    Dr. Dan Hammer: Experience as a Single Degree, Fellowship Trained, Head and Neck Surgeon in the Armed Forces

    When looking for ways to finance his dental degree, Dan Hammer came across the Health Professional Scholarship offered by the Navy. His receipt of this scholarship formulated the trajectory of his career as an oral surgeon. Dan’s journey has involved treating war warriors as a GPR, completing a head and neck fellowship, and helping to develop the digital adaptation of the “jaw in a day” surgery. Following in the footsteps of many OMS pioneers, he has done all of this with a single degree, and he explains why he does not believe he is not disadvantaged by this fact. Although there are some tradeoffs to working in the military, there are also numerous benefits, and Dan openly discusses the pros and cons of his chosen career path in today’s episode. Dan also offers some valuable advice around getting as much exposure as possible to your fields of interest (no matter how trivial an activity may seem), listening to the opinions of other professionals (even if you don’t agree with them), and a key to optimal parenting! 


    Key Points From This Episode:
    Why Dan joined the Navy.Dan’s experience as a GPR in Bethesda, Maryland in 2011. What inspired Dan to do a head and neck fellowship. Where Dan is currently working. Some of the pioneers in the OMS field who had a single degree. Legal and political elements of practicing surgery with a single degree.Benefits of working in the armed forces. Dan’s first flap out of fellowship. The collaborative multidisciplinary environment that Dan works in. Compensation that Dan receives through working in the military. A tradeoff that you need to accept when you become an active-duty oral surgeon. The variety of procedures on which Dan spends his time. Dan explains the “jaw in a day” surgery in more detail, as well as the “digital jaw in a day” adaptation that he and his team came up with.The value that lies in listening, and getting as much exposure as you can in your fields of interest.The correlation between Dan’s work and home life. Advice from Dan around raising children. Dan’s favorite quote: Comparison is the thief of joy. 

    Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:
    Dr. Dan Hammer on Instagram — https://www.instagram.com/drdanhammer/?hl=en 
    Leaders Eat Last by Simon Sinek — https://simonsinek.com/product/leaders-eat-last-book/ 
    Extreme Ownership by Jocko Willink — https://www.amazon.com/Extreme-Ownership-U-S-Navy-SEALs/dp/1250067057 
    Can’t Hurt Me by David Goggins — https://www.amazon.com/Cant-Hurt-Me-Master-Your/dp/1544512287 
    Dr. Grant Stucki Email — grantstucki@gmail.com
    Dr. Grant Stucki Phone — 720-441-6059

    • 41 min
    Dr. Chris Viozzi: Pearls on Alveolar Cleft Grafting and Doing Mission Trips

    Dr. Chris Viozzi: Pearls on Alveolar Cleft Grafting and Doing Mission Trips

    Today’s guest is an oral and maxillofacial surgeon who specializes in alveolar cleft grafting, cleft orthognathic surgery, and distraction. Through these life-changing procedures, Dr. Chris Viozzi is doing his part to give back, and he does this not only through treating patients within the US, but also those outside of it during 10-day mission trips he was doing twice a year prior to the pandemic. In today’s episode, Chris explains the variation that exists amongst the patients he treats, as well as amongst the techniques that can be used for the procedures he does. We also discuss donor sites, follow-ups, and common concerns relating to cleft surgeries. Chris is not fellowship-trained, and his OMS basic training was more than enough to get him to his current position on the Mayo Clinic’s Cleft and Craniofacial Clinic team. 


    Key Points From This Episode:
    The craniofacial team that Chris is a part of, and his niche within the team.Other medical professionals who make up the craniofacial team.Diversity amongst the patients that Chris and his team treat at the clinic.  Vital understandings that anyone doing alveolar cleft grafting must have. Elements of alveolar cleft grafting that have evolved over time. Examples of the variety of techniques for alveolar cleft grafting that exist. Why the iliac crest is usually the best donor site. Common concerns around allografts.  Chris shares why Infuse was black-boxed by the FDA, and his opinion on using it for alveolar cleft grafting.Timing of follow-ups post alveolar cleft grafting.Why Chris avoids corticocancellous blocks whenever possible. The approximate percentage of alveolar cleft grafting patients that need cleft orthognathic surgery later in life. Differences between Asian and Caucasian children in terms of the likelihood of requiring orthognathic surgery.Where Chris acquired the majority of his cleft surgery skills. Chris’s experience doing mission trips, and the perspective he gained as a result. The lack of continuity of care in many countries outside of the US.Challenges to OMS involvement in cleft surgery. Book recommendations from Chris.Chris’s favorite OMS tool.  

    Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:
    Dr. Chris Viozzi — 
    The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks — http://rebeccaskloot.com/the-immortal-life/ 
    Quiet — https://www.quietrev.com/quiet-the-book-2/ 
    Medical Missions for Children — https://www.mmfc.org/ 
    Dr. Grant Stucki Email — grantstucki@gmail.com
    Dr. Grant Stucki Phone — 720-441-6059

    • 56 min
    Drs. Stucki and Weiskopf: Nuances of Using Dental Forceps

    Drs. Stucki and Weiskopf: Nuances of Using Dental Forceps

    In this episode, I’m joined by two repeat guests, Drs. Jake Stucki and Scott Weiskopf, who are here for a discussion around every oral surgeon’s indispensable tool: forceps. In today’s episode, we take a virtual trip around the mouth and share which of the large variety of forceps we think are preferable for taking out each type of tooth, although it’s important to note that there are many different ways of doing things and what works for us might not work for you. We also have some valuable advice to share around how to avoid a root tip breaking, and even how you can prevent your patient from swallowing a tooth (speaking from experience!). 


    Key Points From This Episode:
    What forceps are used for, and when to use them.Scott’s favorite forcep.Each of us shares what we think the best forcep is for removing maxillary molars.Common problem that Scott sees occurring when students start out with the more aggressive forceps. Forceps that we generally use for upper and lower premolars. A comparison between some of the many ashes that exist. Circumstances under which you should be removing tissue. Why the concept of “apical pressure” can be confusing. The tool that Scott starts every tooth removal procedure with. What Jake and I like to use the cow horn for. Scott’s approach to removing mandibular molars. Our thoughts on using a hand piece.How the root shape determines which tools we use. Benefits of using rongeurs. Scott and I share how we like to hold forceps. When you should swap one forcep out with another during a procedure. Advice to avoid breaking the root tip off. Experiences we have had of patients swallowing a tooth, and how to avoid this!Tips for using throat packs.

    Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:
    A.Titan — https://www.atitan.com/ 
    KLS Martin Group — https://www.klsmartin.com/en/disciplines/dental-and-oral-surgery/ 
    Dr. Grant Stucki Email — grantstucki@gmail.com
    Dr. Grant Stucki Phone — 720-441-6059

    • 43 min
    Drs. Grant and Jake Stucki: Discussion On How To Effectively Use Dental Elevators

    Drs. Grant and Jake Stucki: Discussion On How To Effectively Use Dental Elevators

    The purpose of a dental elevator is to break the fibers of the periodontal ligament, and if you know how to use it properly, it is a very powerful tool which can do a lot more than you think! In today’s episode, Dr. Jake Stucki, my brother, is back on the podcast. Our discussion covers how an elevator works, which elevators will likely be most effective in which circumstances, and the times when we wouldn't recommend using an elevator. A lot of my time is spent doing elevations, and as Jake advances on his journey as an oral surgeon he is realizing more and more the value that lies in these procedures. Although there are numerous elevator instruments, some of which we talk about today, we also feel that there’s something missing, which is why we are currently working on the “Stucki Elevator!” 


    Key Points From This Episode:
    Some of our favorite Everyday Oral Surgery episodes. A story about car trouble which relates to the struggles we can face when taking out teeth.The purpose of a dental elevator, and an explanation of how it works. How the process of elevating can differ between patients. Some of the most difficult teeth, and how to deal with them. When a back action isn’t the way to go.Comparing the Cogswell B and the Crane as elevation tools. Examples of times when you shouldn’t elevate. How to sustain pressure when doing a dental elevation. Why some people don’t think it’s a good idea to elevate against another tooth.How to ensure you have control of the dental elevator.Power that comes with knowing how to use an elevator properly. Coming soon: The Stucki Elevator.Jake’s book recommendation for today!

    Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:
    Dr. Jake Stucki —
    Lost Connections by Johann Hari — https://thelostconnections.com/ 
    The Second Mountain by David Brooks — https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/217649/the-second-mountain-by-david-brooks/ 
    Dr. Grant Stucki Email — grantstucki@gmail.com
    Dr. Grant Stucki Phone — 720-441-6059

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Dr. Omar Abubaker: What We Can Do to Help Our Patients Avoid Opioid Addiction

    Dr. Omar Abubaker: What We Can Do to Help Our Patients Avoid Opioid Addiction

    In the United States, aggressive pain management practices have led to an opioid crisis which is responsible for thousands of deaths every year. Among those who have lost their lives in this untimely and avoidable way was Dr. Omar Abubaker’s son. The unspeakable pain of losing a child led Omar down a path of discovery around the dangers of opioids, which are the common go-to pain management drugs for doctors of all specializations, despite their highly addictive properties. Equipped with knowledge and compassion, Omar is on a mission to educate as many people as he can on the subject of opioid addiction, and alternative ways to deal with pain, so that other people don’t have to suffer the same fate as his son. It is our responsibility as medical professionals to do what is best for our patients, and we all need to think long and hard about pain management practices that we advocate for.


    Key Points From This Episode:
    Omar’s home country, and his journey to becoming chairman of the VCU OMFS program. How Omar’s weeks are structured.The life-shattering experience that led Omar to understand the dangers of opioids.  Steps that Omar has taken to educate others about opioid addiction. Why the US population is more susceptible to opioid addiction than most other countries.What pain management should entail.None: the safe amount of drugs and alcohol to consume before the age of 20. The joy and fulfillment that Omar experiences through the work that he does. How parents’ opinions on opioids being prescribed for their children have changed. The importance of weighing up the risks and the benefits of opioids for each patient.Omar’s approach to helping patients manage their opioid addiction. Substitutes for opioids that can be used during surgical procedures. Post-narcotic hyperalgesia: a condition that can come about after being subjected to intravenous opioids. The best book that Omar has read in the past year. How teaching helps Omar to be a better surgeon. 

    Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:
    Dr. Omar Abubaker on LinkedIn — https://www.linkedin.com/in/omar-abubaker-7a965295 
    The Second Mountain by David Brooks — https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/217649/the-second-mountain-by-david-brooks/ 
    When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi and Abraham Verghese — https://www.amazon.com/When-Breath-Becomes-Paul-Kalanithi/dp/081298840X 
    Dr. Grant Stucki Email — grantstucki@gmail.com
    Dr. Grant Stucki Phone — 720-441-6059

    • 57 min
    Dr. Gabriella Tehrany: Pearls For Doing Orthognathic Surgery In A Hospital Setting

    Dr. Gabriella Tehrany: Pearls For Doing Orthognathic Surgery In A Hospital Setting

    Although the crazy hours and high pressure environment that characterize hospital-based practice will not be everybody’s preference, there is nowhere else that Dr. Gabriella Tehrany would rather be utilizing her OMS skills. For the past 12 years (other than during the COVID-19 lockdown) the longest time that Gabreilla has spent away from orthognathic surgery is two weeks, and as a result, she has acquired a wealth of wisdom relating to the field, much of which she shares with us in today’s insightful episode. Gabriella offers advice around looking after your patients’ wellbeing and, just as importantly, your own. Our conversation covers a range of topics, from the value of teamwork to the protocol which led to an 88% same day discharge rate post orthognathic surgery at Gabriella’s hospital. In order to choose the direction you want to take as an oral surgeon there are numerous factors to take into consideration, and, as is Gabriella’s mantra, this episode will inspire you to “figure it out!”


    Key Points From This Episode:
    An overview of what Gabriella’s journey to becoming the Southern California Regional Chief of OMS has looked like.Perks of working as part of a Kaizer practice in a hospital setting. Factors to take into consideration before choosing the setting you are going to work in. Experiences Gabriella had in different practices while she was a resident. The importance of listening to your patients’ desires as an orthognathic surgeon.Why Gabriella never shows her patients soft tissue renderings prior to their surgery.How Gabriella looks after her body, and advice she gives to all residents coming through her practice. Gabriella’s involvement with students at UCLA.People who make up the team that Gabriella is currently working with.Value that lies in doing surgery with assistants. The protocol that Gabriella and her anaesthesiology team implemented which led to an 88% same-day discharge rate after surgery. How patients’ perceptions of being in a hospital changed after the pandemic began.Gabriella’s experience of working in a COVID ward. A rapid fire round with Gabriella.

    Links Mentioned in Today’s Episode:
    Dr. Gabriella Tehrany Email— gabriella.m.tehrany@kp.org 
    The Plant Paradox — https://www.amazon.com/Plant-Paradox-Dangers-Healthy-Disease/dp/006242713X 
    How Not to Die — https://www.amazon.com/How-Not-Die-Discover-Scientifically/dp/1250066115 
    Dr. Grant Stucki Email — grantstucki@gmail.com
    Dr. Grant Stucki Phone — 720-441-6059

    • 45 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
51 Ratings

51 Ratings

Frybergdds ,

Thank you!

Thank you for doing this for our community Dr. Stucki, keep it going if you can.

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