39 episodes

Education To Transformation

At FemmSouth we have a mission.

We believe that through feminist theory, through a comprehensive study of women's history, and through current dialogue women can transform and heal.

We seek to demystify the feminist movement, with grass-roots, community building and local empowering efforts.

We aim to give voice to Southern women in unifying and connecting all sides of the global women's movement.

FemmSouth Podcast FemmSouth: Speaking up for Women's Rights in the South

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.9 • 29 Ratings

Education To Transformation

At FemmSouth we have a mission.

We believe that through feminist theory, through a comprehensive study of women's history, and through current dialogue women can transform and heal.

We seek to demystify the feminist movement, with grass-roots, community building and local empowering efforts.

We aim to give voice to Southern women in unifying and connecting all sides of the global women's movement.

    EP 20 Part II: Music & Writing For Healing With Jolene Thibodeaux

    EP 20 Part II: Music & Writing For Healing With Jolene Thibodeaux

    Jolene @_thibodeaux_ is a local singer, songwriter, poet, and published author. Her writing and music draw from her experiences growing up in Alabama and time spent with her father in the Pacific Northwest. She is a rich and down-to-earth storyteller with imagery steeped in rural living and a passion for nature.

    In this episode, Jolene talks about growing up surrounded by poetry both in words and actions. A debilitating spinal injury she suffered as a child opened her to poetry and music as healing arts. Throughout her life she has existed in spaces of rhyme and rhythm to treat pain and promote healing during a near death experience and a more recent comma from which she is still recovering.

    Jolene also shares her current project to recover and reproduce traditional southern and indigenous lullabies. Lullabies, she says, "can be very dark..." When times are difficult, like during a pandemic, singing to your baby can be a "space where you can be allowed to emote some of the things that are happening."

    You will not want to miss Jolene reading three original poems and performing a lullaby she wrote for her daughter. True to southern gothic form, Jolene gleaned the lyrics for the lullaby from a love note written by her grandfather to her grandmother that were scrawled on the back of a Rules and Regulation Handbook for coalminers over 85 years ago.

    You can gain access to her poetry, books, and music at bbroyal.org/artists/jolene-thibodeaux.

    • 50 min
    EP 20 Music & Writing for Healing with Haley Harkin

    EP 20 Music & Writing for Healing with Haley Harkin

    We have a new episode release and a very special musical guest, Haley Harkin! Haley is a singer/songwriter of folk medicine music from Austin, Texas.  She joins us to continue our discussion of Women Healers, focusing specifically on writers, poets, and songwriters that use their craft for healing.  In this episode, Haley shares her early struggles with insecurity and anxiety, and how her ability to write songs and perform in front of an audience came after working with plant medicines in ceremony.  Writing lyrics and playing music has been for Haley a journey of transformation.  After five years of receiving the medicine and putting herself in vulnerable situations on stage, her voice finally opened and allowed her to become what she considers a conduit for healing lyrics and rhythms that she now shares with others.  

    Haley's soothing voice is an invitation to call on nature, the feminine divine, internal creativity, and intuition to activate our own healing powers.  She shares a live performance of two of her songs, Child and Beauty, which you can purchase on her website, https://haleyharkin.bandcamp.com/

    We hope that you love her music as much as we do!  

    You can also find Haley on Instagram @haleyharkin along with her other sites:

    https://open.spotify.com/artist/4NVY9moD4gj1RJpVfWgz5S

    https://www.patreon.com/haleyharkin

    https://www.facebook.com/haleyharkin

    • 49 min
    EP 19 Part IV with Pamela Smith

    EP 19 Part IV with Pamela Smith

    In the final episode of our Women Healers series, we are circling back to birth work to talk with our special guest, Pamela Smith, one of the founding members of the Farm community in Summertown,Tennessee. 

    Pamela tells the story of joining Steven, Ina May Gaskin and the 200+  caravan in 1970 that eventually becomes the Farm community in TN that develops one of the most influential midwifery centers for natural childbirth along with pre & post natal care for mothers, babies, and their families.  The Farm midwives regard child birth as an empowering experience for women, and they provided natural, home births during a time when midwifery was illegal in many states, including Alabama.  Pamela gave birth to her first son on the Farm (shown on the cover) with the help of Ina May Gaskin and the Farm midwives, which began her journey into birth work and her first birth and postpartum doula service in Boulder Colorado.

    Join us as we discuss the many doors natural childbirth opened for Pamela to become a birth worker, an end of life caregiver, community educator, and grassroots organizer.  Together with her partner, Bob Zellner, Pamela continues to raise the collective consciousness by healing racial and genocidal history. They support youth leaders and grassroots organizations who are building respect for differences of race, gender, religion, and ideology.  Pamela is another example of healers at the forefront of change. 

    You can contact Pamela at http://smithzellner.consulting/
    You can contact the Farm Midwives at http://thefarmmidwives.org/

    Intro & Altro music by Emily Ellis Richards
    Altro music by Emily Stuckey Sellers

    • 59 min
    EP 19 Part III: Special Guests Firestar & Brightheart

    EP 19 Part III: Special Guests Firestar & Brightheart

    Ep 19 Part III of Women Healers with Firestar & Brightheart

    “Midwifing the soul into wellness” is Firestar’s poetic description of her practice of shamanic healing.  Like our previous class of Women Healers, shamanism is a special calling and an undertaking with a long, rich tradition that spans many cultures across the globe. 

    In Part III, our special guests are Firestar and Brightheart, two healers that use psychedelic mushrooms and other plant medicines for individual and group healing ceremonies.  Being immersed in both clinical psychotherapy and indigenous healing traditions, Firestar and Brightheart discuss the dichotomy of language around their practice.  Finding a language and a culture that feels authentic and less hierarchical than traditional shamanic practices is important because their purpose is to guide those they help towards their own healing powers.  

    Firestar and Brightheart  explain how they give special attention to set and setting, creating a fluid, relational connection with the medicine. As Brightheart says, “when you start the conversation with the natural world, its not just one conversation…you are just starting the relationship with this plant” that develops a much deeper connection to a sacred and intuitive healing power.   

    Plant-based psychedelics are breaking new grounds in mental health and will hopefully continue to push us towards a brighter future, one where we are more connected to nature.  

    Cover artist @Harelyandj or www.harleyandj.com
    Intro & Altro music by Emily Ellis Richards
    Altro music by Emily Stuckey Sellers

    • 1 hr 1 min
    EP 19 Part II Women Healers With Eri Guajardo Johnson

    EP 19 Part II Women Healers With Eri Guajardo Johnson

    Our special guest is Eri Guajardo Johnson (she/they), a queer, bi-racial birth worker, community educator, birth consultant for trauma survivors, and founder of Birth Bruja, which is an online educational platform devoted to intersectional, liberational & decolonial approaches to birthwork, healing, and life. Eri's experience working with sexual assault victims and her study of indigenous Mexican and Indian healing modalities informs her approach to birth work. She also has a master's degree in Women, Gender, Spirituality & Social Justice from the California Institute of Integral Studies, and is an online community educator. She brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to our discussions about the full spectrum of birthing experiences and why an intersectional approach is so critical.

    In this episode, Eri shares her journey into birthwork as a way to reclaim her ancestral wisdom and join her spiritual, political, and social activism under one umbrella. Working with predominately marginalized communities, doulas like Eri are effective change makers as their areas of focus reach much farther than the birthing room. We discuss normalizing the birthing spectrum, the relational aspects of birthing and trauma, accessibility, pleasure depletion, and isolation, all areas of concern that doulas address with their clients. Doulas and birth workers provide an essential service in advocating and caring for women and their families, and they are at the forefront of reclaiming reproductive autonomy.

    Visit www.BirthBruja.com to learn more.

    Follow her on Instagram @birthbruja

    • 1 hr 17 min
    EP 19 Part I: Special Guest Nafeesah Roberts As-Salafeeyah

    EP 19 Part I: Special Guest Nafeesah Roberts As-Salafeeyah

    The first episode in our series on Women Healers is a lovely discussion with Nafeesah Roberts As-Salafeeya, a Community Labor and Postpartum Doula.  Doulas play a critical role as healers because they provide physical and emotional support before, during, and after birth in ways that modern hospital providers cannot. They are birthing advocates that help women actualize their preferred birthing experiences whether at home or in the hospital.  Nafeesah tells of her journey into becoming a birth worker, and how her home birth experience put her on the path to empower other women with their birthing journeys.  Inspired by her own ancestral traditions, she started the Mbegu Birthing Project, which is a grassroots organization to support birth work in Mobile, Alabama.  We also talk about the legacy of black midwifery in Alabama and Deirdre Cooper Owen's book, Medical Bondage: Race, Gender, and the Origins of American Gynecology, which presents an important history of black women midwives in bondage and their treatment by white, male physicians developing modern gynecology in the American south.  We talk about Alabama's relationship with this history and how new generations of birth workers will be instrumental in advocating for women’s rights and ensuring racial equality in healthcare and birthing.   
     
    If you would like to learn more about doula training or Nafeesah's services, you can contact her  at Nafeesahthedoula@gmail.com or access her skincare, tinctures, and teas at NittyGrittySkinCare.com.

    Nafeesah's businesses and affiliates:

    Daughters of Daisy Community Labor and Postpartum Doula Services
    The Mbegu Birthing Project
    NittyGrittySkinCare
    One&Strong-United for Quality Reproductive Healthcare
    Facebook.com/DaughtersofDaisyMarie
    Facebook.com/TheMbeguBirthingProject
    TheMbeguBirthingProject@instagram
    Nafeesahthedreamdoula@instagram

    • 58 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
29 Ratings

29 Ratings

heart glow ,

Must listen

This podcast is a must subscribe for anyone who struggles to understand centuries of patriarchy and oppression, and how great female writers, iconic to obscure, have grappled with creating a better world. Leigh is passionate, interested, and gives authentic women the platform to speak about how these issues continue to play out in southern United States society and culture.

acmtiger ,

Femm

Any feminist podcast is good. Also bux3000 there religion and color don’t matter.

bg moore ,

Intersectionality

I was happy to stumble across this podcast while researching Audre Lorde for an upcoming lecture. I appreciated the hosts acknowledging that intersectionality can be difficult to talk about because it forces people to look at their own privilege. Your approach to the subject felt really human and authentic — looking forward to hearing more.

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