4 min

Flash Voting: Could Party Primaries be Vulnerable to Mobbing by Fed Up Voters‪?‬ Rampart Caucus

    • Politics

American voters can overwhelm primaries to send the least partisan candidate to the general election. Let’s consider Flash Voting, something like a choreographed Flash Mob.

Low turnout at primaries and candidates appealing to more partisan voters sends a more partisan candidate to each general election. Primaries are most often said to be the primary cause of polarization in Congress. Any candidate who pledges to support the Real American Majority Platform—RAMP, prioritizing the affordable priorities of most Americans could appeal to and attract fed up party affiliates and in most States unaffiliated/independent voters. By focusing on primaries American voters could nominate a general election candidate more likely to represent most Americans.

Rules to vote in Primaries vary by State. After researching the rules in detail for States with Congressional elections scheduled in 2022 and 2024 I’ll publish another article and link it here. Overview of State Primary Rules

Most States have primary rules that allow voters to participate in just one primary or the other.

The goal is to send red or blue candidates to Congress who pledge to support the priorities of RAMP, not instead of their party’s platform, but in addition to their party’s message. Improving the odds of electing a candidate with influence to protect the interest of most Americans in Congress. To win elections within a system that has been designed to favor the controlling parties, a central RAMP campaign should be designed to promote State campaigns that obtain RAMP Pledges and drum up enthusiasm for a representative candidate that will increase turnout by fed up party affiliates and independents.

It’s a fact that Primaries historically have very low turnout. And candidates tend to appeal to the extremes of their party. This makes them very vulnerable to the higher turnout mentioned and creates a huge contrast to a RAMP pledged candidate, especially one affiliated with the party.

Perhaps a unique process akin to a Flash Mob will work. The recently popular event where thousands of people gather in a public area and mill about. A few people start dancing while a few watch. Those folks start dancing and before long the entire crowd starts dancing in a choreographed event that was staged weeks in advance.

Flash Voting to overwhelm a primary and takeover the nomination with a candidate that may have secretly pledged to RAMP or not announced their pledge until election day. Voters could organize according to the primary rules of their State and one by one each take back Congressional seats occupied by partisan incumbents. Or maybe the incumbent can be persuaded to support RAMP.

The vulnerability exists and could be choreographed to make this plan work.

Subscribe at rampartcaucus.substack.com

American voters can overwhelm primaries to send the least partisan candidate to the general election. Let’s consider Flash Voting, something like a choreographed Flash Mob.

Low turnout at primaries and candidates appealing to more partisan voters sends a more partisan candidate to each general election. Primaries are most often said to be the primary cause of polarization in Congress. Any candidate who pledges to support the Real American Majority Platform—RAMP, prioritizing the affordable priorities of most Americans could appeal to and attract fed up party affiliates and in most States unaffiliated/independent voters. By focusing on primaries American voters could nominate a general election candidate more likely to represent most Americans.

Rules to vote in Primaries vary by State. After researching the rules in detail for States with Congressional elections scheduled in 2022 and 2024 I’ll publish another article and link it here. Overview of State Primary Rules

Most States have primary rules that allow voters to participate in just one primary or the other.

The goal is to send red or blue candidates to Congress who pledge to support the priorities of RAMP, not instead of their party’s platform, but in addition to their party’s message. Improving the odds of electing a candidate with influence to protect the interest of most Americans in Congress. To win elections within a system that has been designed to favor the controlling parties, a central RAMP campaign should be designed to promote State campaigns that obtain RAMP Pledges and drum up enthusiasm for a representative candidate that will increase turnout by fed up party affiliates and independents.

It’s a fact that Primaries historically have very low turnout. And candidates tend to appeal to the extremes of their party. This makes them very vulnerable to the higher turnout mentioned and creates a huge contrast to a RAMP pledged candidate, especially one affiliated with the party.

Perhaps a unique process akin to a Flash Mob will work. The recently popular event where thousands of people gather in a public area and mill about. A few people start dancing while a few watch. Those folks start dancing and before long the entire crowd starts dancing in a choreographed event that was staged weeks in advance.

Flash Voting to overwhelm a primary and takeover the nomination with a candidate that may have secretly pledged to RAMP or not announced their pledge until election day. Voters could organize according to the primary rules of their State and one by one each take back Congressional seats occupied by partisan incumbents. Or maybe the incumbent can be persuaded to support RAMP.

The vulnerability exists and could be choreographed to make this plan work.

Subscribe at rampartcaucus.substack.com

4 min