9 episodes

Some call it Hurricane Katrina. Some call it the Federal Flood. Others call it the day the levees broke. On August 29, 2005, the city of New Orleans was submerged. That story of hubris, incompetence, and nature's wrath is now etched into the national consciousness. But the people who lived through the flood and its aftermath have a different story to tell. A story of rumors, betrayal, and one of the most misunderstood events in American history. Hosted by Vann R. Newkirk II.

Floodlines The Atlantic

    • History
    • 4.8 • 2K Ratings

Some call it Hurricane Katrina. Some call it the Federal Flood. Others call it the day the levees broke. On August 29, 2005, the city of New Orleans was submerged. That story of hubris, incompetence, and nature's wrath is now etched into the national consciousness. But the people who lived through the flood and its aftermath have a different story to tell. A story of rumors, betrayal, and one of the most misunderstood events in American history. Hosted by Vann R. Newkirk II.

    The Wake

    The Wake

    Part VIII: Water, like history, repeats itself.

    • 54 min
    Destiny.

    Destiny.

    Part VII: People try to come home. But does home want them anymore?

    • 30 min
    Reckoning.

    Reckoning.

    Part VI: How could the levees have failed?

    • 36 min
    Exodus.

    Exodus.

    Part V: A hero arrives. But not the one everyone expected.

    • 30 min
    The Bridge

    The Bridge

    Part IV: Rumor becomes tragedy.

    • 25 min
    Through the Looking Glass

    Through the Looking Glass

    Part III: A universe of rumor and misinformation plays out on television.

    • 28 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
2K Ratings

2K Ratings

FlavaEnneaear ,

Just...wow.

After finishing the final episode “The Wake”, I must first comment on the interview with Brownie. Despite the host and other producers giving him 6 hours to perform a shred of the empathy needed to redeem his behavior, Michael Brown was unable to get past his raging narcissism. 14 years he has had to reflect. And all he can come to is how the criticisms impact him. HIS reputation, HIS obituary, HIS feelings. It is a true wonderment how our society is so pregnant with the toxicity of “manhood”, that we birth these people into power.

Thankfully, we have a new brand of manhood represented in Vann R. Newkirk, who demonstrates empathy on another level. Who provides an example of speaking to truth to power and holding the oppressed and the traumatized in the light. Although we are left wanting after the interview with Brownie, the strength of vulnerability needed to conduct that interview (as a Black human) is palpable to the listener. You can feel Vann’s love for NOLA and it’s people throughout.

Le-Ann is the breakout star of this podcast to me. She is able to embody the sorrow, confusion, strength, rage and renewal of this incredible trauma. She speaks beautifully to how the experience altered her on all
levels. Le-Ann gives us an honest, dynamic picture of the human experience of loss.

I hope that the Atlantic continues to support stories like this that center the voices of the people.

Rhi 🌞🌛 ,

Incredible.

This podcast is a beautiful blend of history and art, pain and hope, destruction and renewal. And the production is extremely well done. Highly, highly recommend.

monica0345 ,

Captivating

I was young when this happened and never really heard the full story behind the failure of the levees. To Leanne, I am sorry, even if our government at that time was too inept to admit their failures. Thank you all for sharing your story and awesome job by the host.

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