100 episodes

Food Safety Matters is a podcast for food safety professionals hosted by the Food Safety Magazine editorial team – the leading media brand in food safety for over 20 years. Each episode will feature a conversation with a food safety professional sharing their experiences and insights of the important job of safeguarding the world’s food supply.

Food Safety Matters Food Safety Magazine

    • Science
    • 4.6 • 40 Ratings

Food Safety Matters is a podcast for food safety professionals hosted by the Food Safety Magazine editorial team – the leading media brand in food safety for over 20 years. Each episode will feature a conversation with a food safety professional sharing their experiences and insights of the important job of safeguarding the world’s food supply.

    Episode 133: Coffman, Brice-Williamson, Kenjora: Allied to Advance Food Safety

    Episode 133: Coffman, Brice-Williamson, Kenjora: Allied to Advance Food Safety

    Vanessa Coffman, Ph.D. is the Director of the Alliance to Stop Foodborne Illness. She has a diverse background in food safety and sustainability, with a focus on environmental exposures across the food system. Dr. Coffman has conducted various research for the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO), on topics such as farming opportunities in post-war Sierra Leonne, occupational and residential exposures from large pork production operations in rural North Carolina, and the association between nitrate in drinking water from food animal operations and fetal health outcomes. Dr. Coffman previously worked at Stop Foodborne Illness as a policy analyst, and she has testified in front of U.S. government officials, authored peer-reviewed papers, and helped draft federal regulations.
    Dr. Coffman received a Ph.D. in Environmental Epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and an M.S. degree from the University of California–Berkeley in Global Public Health and the Environment.
    Sherry Brice-Williamson, M.B.A. is the Vice President of Global Quality and Food Safety at the Kellogg Company, where she oversees end-to-end food safety and quality for Kellogg's internal and external network. Sherry has over 20 years of experience in the industry and joined Kellogg in 2012 as part of the Pringles acquisition from P&G. She has served in numerous supply chain roles in the company, ranging from operations to quality. Sherry was promoted to Vice President of Global Food Safety and Quality in January 2020.
    Sherry is on the SSAFE board of directors and is affiliated with a number of other industry associations such as Stop Foodborne Illness, where she is an Alliance member. Sherry also co-chairs the national chapter of KAARG (Kellogg African American Resource Group). Sherry holds B.S. and M.B.A. degrees in Business Management and is a member of the Golden Key International National Honors Society.
    Megan Kenjora, M.P.A. is the Senior Manager of Food Safety Culture at The Hershey Company, where she leads a diverse global team to embed food safety in the hearts and minds of all Hershey employees. Megan has extensive experience building relationships among diverse groups, getting cross-functional support, and effectively communicating messages across cultures.
    Megan was an engaged member of the Global Food Safety Initiative (GFSI) Technical Working Group that authored the GFSI position paper, “A Culture of Food Safety,” and served as the inaugural chair of the International Association for Food Protection (IAFP) Food Safety Culture Professional Development Group. Bringing a passion for food safety culture, she currently serves on the planning committee and numerous working groups as part of the Alliance to Stop Foodborne Illness.
    A combat veteran who served eight years in the U.S. Army, Megan came to Hershey in 2014 from Raytheon, where she specialized in adult learning for various intelligence courses. She is a lifelong learner and an advocate for DEI, serving as a co-lead for the Hershey Veterans Business Resource Group. Megan is an M.B.A. candidate at UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School, and she holds an M.P.A. from Penn State University, B.A. degrees in Political Science and Classics from Bucknell University, and a Korean linguist certification from the Defense Language Institute.
    In this episode of Food Safety Matters, we speak with Vanessa, Sherry, and Megan [25:40] about:
    The history of Stop Foodborne Illness and the Alliance to Stop Foodborne Illness, and how the Alliance leverages food safety culture as a vehicle for positive change in the food industry to make food safer for consumers The ways in which Megan’s experience at Hershey informs the Alliance’s work, such as bringing a proactive perspective to industry engagement and encouraging the adoption of best practices How Kellogg’s and Hershey’s memberships in the Alliance have helped both companies drive sustainable foo

    • 57 min
    Ep. 132: David Acheson: A Food Safety Smorgasbord—Salmonella, Cannabis, PFAS, and More

    Ep. 132: David Acheson: A Food Safety Smorgasbord—Salmonella, Cannabis, PFAS, and More

    David W.K. Acheson, M.D., F.R.C.P., is the President and CEO of The Acheson Group, a consulting firm that provides strategic advice on all matters relating to food safety and food defense, as well as recall and crisis management support, to food companies and ancillary technology companies around the world.
    Prior to founding The Acheson Group in 2013, Dr. Acheson served as the Chief Medical Officer in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (FDA's CFSAN). Following several other positions at FDA, he was appointed Associate Commissioner for Foods, which gave him an agency-wide leadership role for all food and feed issues, including health promotion and nutrition. Dr. Acheson was also a partner at Leavitt Partners and managed Leavitt Partners Global Food Safety Solutions from 2009 to 2013.
    Dr. Acheson graduated from the University of London Medical School in 1980. Following training in internal medicine and infectious diseases in the UK, in 1987 he moved to the New England Medical Center and Tufts University in Boston, Massachusetts. As an Associate Professor at Tufts University, Dr. Acheson undertook basic molecular pathogenesis research on foodborne pathogens, especially Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli.
    In this episode of Food Safety Matters, we speak with David [28:53] about:
    The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service’s (USDA’s FSIS’) declaration of Salmonella as an adulterant in breaded and stuffed raw chicken products, as well as future federal regulation of Salmonella contamination of poultry Considerations that could affect the way in which Salmonella in poultry is regulated, such as different serotypes and the risk they pose to public health The importance of FDA clearly defining for growers what compliance with the agricultural water rule under the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) entails The various, nuanced factors that must be decided in order to adequately regulate ingestible Cannabis products How the federal legal status of Cannabis may hamper foodborne illness reporting and outbreak investigations related to edible Cannabis products Why more effective consumer communication would improve the food recall system, and how recall modernization can achieve that goal How food companies can prepare themselves to meet increasingly stringent aflatoxin regulations—or regulations for any contaminant—through risk assessment, and why regulatory bodies should holistically consider the ramifications of regulations before implementing them Possible avenues that companies and regulatory agencies can take when considering how to reduce human exposure to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from foods How chemical residues in foods have been neglected in comparison to microbiological contaminants, and why it is crucial to build scientific understanding around the public health risk of different chemical contaminants. News and Resources
    USDA-FSIS Proposed Regulatory Framework for Reducing Salmonella in Poultry May Declare Salmonella an Adulterant [3:18]
    More Research Needed on Exposure To, Toxicity of Microplastics in Food [7:18]
    International Organizations Develop One Health Action Plan, Food Safety is Key Component [12:18]
    WHO Launches Global Strategy for Food Safety 2022–2030 [13:08]
    Edible Sensor for Frozen Food Safety Indicates When Products Have Been Thawed, Refrozen [18:45]
    Webinar: FDA's Tech-Enabled Traceability—New Standards to Improve Food System Transparency
    FSIS Proposed Regulatory Framework
    Microplastics Found in Human Breast Milk for the First Time
    Former Kerry Inc. Manager Pleads Guilty in Connection with Insanitary Plant Conditions Linked to 2018 Salmonella Poisoning Outbreak
    CDC: Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Mbandaka Infections Linked to Kellogg’s Honey Smacks Cereal (Final Update)
    We Want to Hear from You!
    Please send us your questions and suggestions to podcast@food-safety.com

    • 1 hr 12 min
    Ep. 131: Michael Cramer: Teachings for Next-Gen FSQA and Sanitation Professionals

    Ep. 131: Michael Cramer: Teachings for Next-Gen FSQA and Sanitation Professionals

    Michael Cramer started his food career with Swift and Company at a turkey processing facility in eastern Pennsylvania while attending West Chester University. He graduated in 1977 with a B.S. degree in Health Education. During his career with Swift and Company, he was Quality Assurance (QA) Manager at plants in Pennsylvania and North Carolina, a Production Specialist, and a Documentation Manager at the corporate headquarters.
    In 1993, Michael started with Specialty Brands Inc. in Ontario, Canada, where he was Director of Food Safety and Quality. He spent 27 years with the company, and remained as Senior Director of Food Safety and Quality Assurance (FSQA) through the purchase by Ajinomoto Foods North America Inc. He developed and implemented programs to ensure production of safe, quality, ethnic frozen foods. Mike retired from Ajinomoto Foods in July 2021.
    Mike has been a member of the International Association for Food Protection (IAFP), and was part of the FSQA team at Ajinomoto Foods that won the prestigious Black Pearl Award in 2020. In addition to authoring Food Plant Sanitation, he is also on the Editorial Advisory Board of Food Safety Magazine and has written articles for Food Safety Magazine dealing with Listeria control, biosecurity, sanitation and sanitary design, and allergens. He was also a contributing member of the American Frozen Foods Institute (AFFI) Listeria Working Group. In addition, he has participated in multiple Food Safety Matters podcasts, conducted food sanitation webinars, and has been a presenter at numerous food safety and quality conferences. He remains active in retirement, giving back to the industry.
    In this episode of Food Safety Matters, we speak with Mike [18:25] about:
    What led him to write and publish Food Plant Sanitation and its two subsequent versions, and how the third edition touches on real-life experiences with the Food Safety and Modernization Act (FSMA) in sanitation The difference between validation and verification, and what those concepts look like in sanitation Guidelines, including regulations and directives for FSQA professionals, for designing effective sanitation standard operating procedures (SSOPs) Why FSQA personnel should spend time on the sanitation shift and have conversations with chemical suppliers, testing labs, colleagues at other plants, and consultants Trade associations and publications that can be beneficial resources to FSQA professionals Mike's experience developing a robust FSQA culture by aligning sanitarians’ purpose, using cross-functional teams, and getting leaders to buy into and understand FSQA The difference behind “consumers” and “customers” from an FSQA point of view The importance of relationship-building, flexibility, and communication with FSQA staff to ensure that a healthy food safety culture survives and thrives within a company Ways in which companies can manage turnover and maintain or transfer skills and knowledge. News and Resources
    FDA, CDC Partner to Strengthen Retail Food Safety with MOU [3:40]
    Study Examines Listeria, Salmonella Survival in Dry Packaging Facilities, Efficacy of Sanitizers [6:20]
    FDA Study Will Evaluate Children’s Exposure to Mercury from Seafood [11:21]
    Seaweed Food Safety Knowledge is Limited; FAO, WHO Call for Research, Regulation [12:42]
    Sponsored by:
    Cintas
    Download the Cintas Program for Food Processing Apparel brochure.
    We Want to Hear from You!
    Please send us your questions and suggestions to podcast@food-safety.com

    • 1 hr 6 min
    Elanco: Integrated Pest Management as a Key Part of Food Safety Programs

    Elanco: Integrated Pest Management as a Key Part of Food Safety Programs

    Dr. Alissa Welsher is Associate Senior Consultant at Elanco Poultry Food Safety. Dr. Welsher received her B.S. degree in Biological Sciences from the University of Pittsburgh, as well as an M.S. degree in Poultry Science and a Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Biology from the University of Arkansas. Her area of expertise is molecular physiology, and she specializes in heat stress and gut health.
    In this episode of Food Safety Matters, we speak with Dr. Welsher about:
    Why a comprehensive Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program is crucial in a poultry processing plant Why it is important, at the farm level, to consider pests that carry foodborne pathogens upstream, and the types of pests that carry foodborne pathogens Pathogens that cause problems in poultry houses Why producers should prioritize IPM as an important part of food safety programs Strategies to minimize the spread of pathogens and disease from pests throughout farms How producers can reevaluate IPMs in response to resistance issues Best practices for processors to manage resistance How Elanco’s Food Safety team can help poultry producers develop an IPM program to address food safety concerns Where listeners can learn more about Elanco and its solutions for developing an IPM program. Sponsored by:
    Elanco
    We Want to Hear from You!
    Please send us your questions and suggestions to podcast@food-safety.com

    • 25 min
    BONUS: Hughes and McEntire: FDA’s Commodity-Specific Prevention Strategies for Produce

    BONUS: Hughes and McEntire: FDA’s Commodity-Specific Prevention Strategies for Produce

    Stephen Hughes is Prevention Coordinator within the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN), within the Office of Food Safety at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). After outbreaks and adverse incidents, he runs a systematic process to identify and implement public health interventions intended to help limit or prevent future outbreaks linked to certain FDA-regulated foods. Before coming to FDA, Stephen worked in a public health program in Virginia, in program areas that included food safety, indoor air quality, aquatic health, and general environmental health.   
    Dr. Jennifer McEntire is Chief Food Safety and Regulatory Officer at the International Fresh Produce Association. Prior to the merger of United Fresh and Produce Marketing Association, Jennifer was Vice President of Food Safety and Technology at United Fresh Produce Association.
    A food microbiologist by background, she has always worked in the Washington D.C., area, bringing a scientific perspective to food safety regulatory issues. She was previously Vice President of Science Operations at the Grocery Manufacturers Association. She has served as Vice President and Chief Science Officer at The Acheson Group and as the Senior Staff Scientist and Director of Science and Technology Projects at the Institute of Food Technologists.
    Jennifer earned a Ph.D. from Rutgers University as a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Needs Fellow in food safety. She serves as an advisory board member of the Global Food Traceability Center, the technical committee of the Center for Produce Safety, and she is on the executive committee of the Food Safety Preventive Controls Alliance.
    In this episode of Food Safety Matters, we speak with Stephen and Jennifer [3:35] about:
    FDA’s three main reasons—epidemiological, logistical, and relational—for taking a commodity-specific, collaborative approach to reducing foodborne illness outbreaks The key importance of prevention in mitigating food safety incidents, and how collaboration between FDA and industry enables food producers to help inform and adopt effective prevention strategies The types of conversations taking place between FDA, industry, academia, and public health partners throughout the development of prevention strategies The learnings from past foodborne illness outbreaks that are considered when creating prevention strategies and identifying future work areas to align cross-sector stakeholders The possibility of filling some of the gaps in the Produce Safety Rule with commodity-specific prevention strategies The challenges of conducting root-cause analysis in the produce sector, the benefits of getting industry to buy in to the practice, and how the conversation around root-cause analysis could be improved Why educating industry to be critical thinkers about produce safety (rather than which minimum requirements to fulfill) provides the greatest opportunity for improving outcomes FDA’s intent to develop a prevention strategy for powdered infant formula in light of recent events, and how the agency is collaborating with stakeholders to identify other commodities that are deserving of prevention strategies. Resources
    FDA Releases Food Safety Prevention Strategies for Salmonellosis, Listeriosis from Mushrooms, Onions
    We Want to Hear from You!
    Please send us your questions and suggestions to podcast@food-safety.com

    • 41 min
    Ep. 130: Kim Livsey: Leading a Food Safety Incident Management Team

    Ep. 130: Kim Livsey: Leading a Food Safety Incident Management Team

    Kimberly (Kim) Livsey is a Senior Emergency Response Coordinator in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA's) Office of Regulatory Affairs' (ORA’s) Office of Human and Animal Food Operations. In addition to more than 20 years of federal service at FDA, she has leveraged her expertise in food safety oversight and emergency management at the state and local government levels. Prior to her time at FDA, she was an environmental health specialist with the DeKalb County Board of Health in Decatur, Georgia, where she served as a supervisor and trainer in the food protection program.
    Kim has led incident response, management, and command activities on the frontlines of multiple natural disasters, including Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, Gustav, and Irma. She has also contributed to leadership and planning for food safety and defense at numerous special event operations, including the international G-8 summit, The World Games 2022, Democratic and Republican political conventions, and Presidential inaugurations.
    In March 2022, Kim spent seven weeks leading the ORA Incident Management Team in response to adverse events associated with the use of powdered infant formula products. She and her 37-person team took action as part of FDA’s response, including facility inspection, product sample analysis, consumer complaint triage, state sample request coordination, media inquiry response, and enforcement action initiation. 
    In this episode of Food Safety Matters, we speak with Kim [26:12] about:
    How FDA leverages the Incident Command System (ICS) to coordinate multiple FDA organizational components to manage incidents, such as foodborne illness outbreaks What Incident Management Teams (IMTs) are, as well as their purpose, structure, and activities The various roles that exist on an IMT and how the personnel to fill those roles are chosen How FDA mobilized an ORA-wide IMT at the field level, for the first time, to investigate and respond to the recent, highly publicized foodborne illness outbreak associated with Abbott Nutrition powdered infant formula Kim’s experience leading an IMT with the Jefferson County Department of Health in Birmingham, Alabama to ensure the safety of food served at the 2022 World Games Essential qualities for an IMT Incident Commander (IC) to embody, and the ways in which efficacious leadership and use of IMTs can impact industry and consumers How FDA responds to foodborne illness outbreaks through its Coordinated Outbreak and Response Network (CORE); its four standing, geographical IMTs; and its rapid response teams (RRTs) The working relationship between FDA’s four standing IMTs and state jurisdictions Why working with and on IMTs can be rewarding. News and Resources
    FDA Releases Food Safety Prevention Strategies for Salmonellosis, Listeriosis from Mushrooms, Onions [5:13]
    FDA Releases Review of Response to Infant Formula Supply Crisis, Addresses Improvements [9:47]
    FDA Highlights Key Food Code Recommendations for Mitigating Norovirus in Restaurants [14:53]
    Resource Library for Retail Food Regulators Conducting Foodborne Illness Outbreak Investigations
    Sponsored by:
    Cintas 
    Download the Cintas Program for Food Processing Apparel brochure.
    We Want to Hear from You!
    Please send us your questions and suggestions to podcast@food-safety.com

    • 52 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
40 Ratings

40 Ratings

Indiana Cruiser ,

Love current special series

Love the current series you are doing with the food safety authors. It has been a great, fun, informative series.

Wayne/MA ,

Thank you, FSM Team!

What a valuable resource this podcast is. I appreciate the deep library of past episodes. Since my background is in other areas of the food industry, I don’t have a large professional network specific to food safety/food manufacturing. The conversations on this podcast is a great supplement and is awesome for exposing me to new concepts.

August Consumer ,

Wasteful Chit chat among experts

“it’s good to educate the public about food safety.”

After an episode on Salmonella, I wasted time. Go to Wikipedia for an education instead of this podcast. This is the second podcast on food protection by experts that just waste the listener‘s time.

I hope there is one by someone who knows how to put a program together and how to interview experts.

Why should I subscribe to a magazine when the speakers waste my time, and there is much on the internet.

If you want to educate, Talk is not teaching.
And scientists talking about a scientific discipline is not science.

Please replace the presenter with someone skilled in presentation, instead of a self absorbed bore.

I’m not your captive audience.

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