248 episodes

From Neanderthals to Napoleon's sister, Footnoting History's team of academics share their favorite stories from across history. New episodes every other Saturday.

Footnoting History Footnoting History

    • History
    • 4.3 • 408 Ratings

From Neanderthals to Napoleon's sister, Footnoting History's team of academics share their favorite stories from across history. New episodes every other Saturday.

    Ivanhoe and the Modern Middle Ages

    Ivanhoe and the Modern Middle Ages

    (Lucy) How did Ivanhoe become a wildly popular school text? And what happened to the interpretation of the text when it did? Across the Anglophone world, Scott’s medieval England became reified as a time and place of chivalric adventure, despite the novel’s often ironic tone and often pointed social criticisms. This episode examines how Sir Walter Scott’s imagined past became something very different as it was reinterpreted in popular culture, in sometimes sinister ways. 


     


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    • 18 min
    Ivanhoe and the Invention of Merry England

    Ivanhoe and the Invention of Merry England

    (Lucy) There are some things that almost any Hollywood film set in the Middle Ages can count on. It will be set in England. There will be a lot of forests. The Norman nobility will oppress the Saxon peasantry. Other things are optional but frequent. There may be a tournament or a siege. There may be a reference to the Crusades. Robin Hood may turn up. There may be a trial for witchcraft. Sir Walter Scott’s Ivanhoe contains all of these things, and since its publication in 1819, this runaway bestseller has helped to shape Anglophone ideas of the Middle Ages. 


     


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    • 17 min
    Sicilian Vespers, Part II: The Massacre and the War of the Vespers

    Sicilian Vespers, Part II: The Massacre and the War of the Vespers

    (Josh) Manfred of House Hohenstaufen is dead; Charles of Anjou, in the name of the papacy, has claimed Sicily and awaits coronation. Across the Ionian and Aegean Seas, Michael Palaeologus looks to the Latin West and waits. In Germany, Conradin, son of the last "rightful" king of Sicily, desires to seize his own claim to the throne. And the House of Aragon begins to stir and look towards Sicily with its own ambitions. This week on Footnoting History, the thrilling conclusion to our saga of the Sicilian Vespers which sees 4000 Frenchmen dead. 


     


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    • 32 min
    Sicilian Vespers, Part I: The Uprising

    Sicilian Vespers, Part I: The Uprising

    In the middle of the 13th Century, a violent uprising began on the island of Sicily in an attempt to oust the French King, Charles I of Anjou, that left approximately 13,000 people dead over the course of six weeks. This violent uprising also sparked a wider pan-Mediterranean war between the Spanish crown of Aragon, the Angevin Kingdom of Naples, the Byzantine Empire, and the Kingdom of France. In part one of this two-part series, Josh explores the causes of the uprising and the immediate aftermath. (Josh)


     


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    • 27 min
    The Ottoman Kafes or the Princely Cage

    The Ottoman Kafes or the Princely Cage

    (Elizabeth) Starting in the early 1600s, the Ottoman sultans switched from practicing fraticide to confinement as a means to preserve their rule from their grasping brothers. In this episode, Elizabeth examines how this treatment led a number of eventual sultans to have less than stellar qualifications and less than stellar legacies. 


     


    Click here for tips for Teaching with Podcasts! Or here to buy some FH Merch! We are now on Youtube with accessible captions checked by members of our team!


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    • 13 min
    Mohenjo Daro: Living City, Mound of the Dead

    Mohenjo Daro: Living City, Mound of the Dead

    (Lucy) Mohenjo Daro was a vast metropolis, with elaborate urban infrastructure… and largely mysterious urban organization. It was a center of the Indus Valley civilization. Located in what is now Pakistan and northwestern India, the cities of this civilization covered territory roughly the size of western Europe. Because its language still hasn’t been deciphered by modern scholars, there’s still a lot we don’t know about it. But this hasn’t stopped modern scholars, writers, politicians, and artists from engaging with and fantasizing about it. This episode looks at what history can tell us about the art and culture — and water management — of this ancient civilization.


     


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    • 18 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
408 Ratings

408 Ratings

cdm421 ,

Just skip Lucy’s

I thoroughly enjoy this podcast now.

Omnid ,

Always Delightful and Obsure

I really enjoy this podcast and the effort all the presenters go to provide well researched information on obscure topics.

adwade ,

The Evelyn Nesbit episode is atrocious

I like this podcast. But the Evelyn Nesbit episode needs to be addressed because the podcaster literally says that two historical figures raping children, one of whom kidnapping women and beat them, is “eccentric” and “quirky”. This is obviously disgusting, especially because she refers to one of the men with the nickname given to him by one of the girls he manipulated. I can’t believe someone actually recorded this and thought, “yeah, sounds about right” and then uploaded it?? Violence against children is not eccentric, it is evil and criminal, and should not be portrayed as simply weird and unusual.

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