10 episodes

Foreword will introduce you to Humanities researchers at Brock University and explore how the Humanities can help us make sense of the rapidly changing world around us. Produced by the Faculty of Humanities at Brock University, Canada.

Foreword Faculty of Humanities, Brock University

    • Society & Culture

Foreword will introduce you to Humanities researchers at Brock University and explore how the Humanities can help us make sense of the rapidly changing world around us. Produced by the Faculty of Humanities at Brock University, Canada.

    Unabridged: Early Modern Bookscapes

    Unabridged: Early Modern Bookscapes

    The final episode in our current series features an extended interview with Dr. Leah Knight, Associate Professor with the Department of English Language and Literature.Dr. Knight discusses her early work exploring the connections between books and botany and how her research interests transitioned into examining women’s participation in Early Modern book culture in England through the figures of Anne Clifford (1590-1676) and Hester Pulter (1605-1678). She shares what it is like to work with rare books and manuscripts and considers our modern relationship with text in print and digital formats.Knight’s most recent project, The Pulter Project, with Wendy Wall of Northwestern University in Illinois, United States, examines the manuscripts of poet Hester Pulter. It was selected as the year’s best project in digital scholarship by the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women and Gender in 2018.Find a full transcript at https://brocku.ca/humanities/forewordLinksOf Books and Botany in Early Modern England: Sixteenth-Century Plants and Print Culture (Routledge, 2009) Reading Green in Early Modern England (Routledge, 2014)Women’s Bookscapes in Early Modern Britain: Reading, Ownership, Circulation (University of Michigan Press, 2018; edited with Micheline White, and Elizabeth Sauer)The Pulter Project: Poet in the Making ( co-directed and -edited with Wendy Wall, 2018)Digital project gives voice to 17th century female poet (Brock News, 19 November 2018)Leah Knight faculty profileDepartment of English Language & Literature CreditsWe love to hear from our listeners! Join us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram @brockhumanities.Please subscribe and rate us on your favourite podcasting app so you don’t miss an episode.Learn more about the Faculty of Humanities, including our events, programs of study, and departments, online.Foreword is hosted and produced by Alison Innes for the Faculty of Humanities at Brock University.Sound design and editing by Serena Atallah. Theme music is by Khalid Imam.Special thanks to Brock University’s MakerSpace and Brock University Marketing and Communications for studio and web support.This podcast is financially supported by the Faculty of Humanities at Brock University.

    • 48 min
    Unabridged: Indigenous Mascots

    Unabridged: Indigenous Mascots

    Welcome to the first of two special episodes of Foreword that we’re calling Unabridged. In these episodes we’ll be bringing you the full conversation I had with one of our researchers. This episode you’ll hear our full conversation with Dr. Jason Black, Fulbright researcher with the Centre for Canadian Studies, recorded in February 2020. We wanted to bring you this conversation because Jason explains important concepts that come up in many academic disciplines and popular media, such as coloniality, decolonization, and identity. He shares how he became interested in activism and the Indigenous mascot controversy, why the language and imagery we use to talk about Indigenous issues matters, and how non-Indigenous folks can engage with these issues. Dr. Jason Black was the 2020 Fulbright Research Chair in Transnational Studies with the Centre for Canadian Studies at Brock University. He visited from the Department of Communication Studies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte where he is a professor and the chairperson. He holds a PhD in Rhetorical Studies from the University of Maryland and has researched and published extensively on rhetoric and discourse around LGTBQ and Indigenous activist movements. His most recent publications include Mascot Nation: The Controversy over Native American Representations in Sports (co-authored with Andrew Billings) and Decolonizing Native American Rhetoric: Communicating Self-Determination. While at Brock, he taught CANA3V92 “Social Activism and Culture in Canada and the United States.” Find a full transcript at https://brocku.ca/humanities/forewordLinks Mascot Nation: The Controversy over Native American Representations in Sports (co-authored with Andrew Billings,  University of Illinois Press, 2018)Decolonizing Native American Rhetoric: Communicating Self-Determination (co-edited with Casey Ryan Kelly, Peter Lang Publishing, 2018)Brock welcomes Fulbright Chair in Transnational Studies (Brock News)Superbowl reignites debate over Chiefs' name (Brock News)Professor says SuperBowl will reignite conversation around 'controversial' Chiefs name (CBC Hamilton)Why won't the Kansas City Chiefs change their logo and symbols (CBC Here and Now)Centre for Canadian Studies, Brock University CreditsWe love to hear from our listeners! Join us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram @brockhumanities.Please subscribe and rate us on your favourite podcasting app so you don’t miss an episode.Learn more about the Faculty of Humanities, including our events, programs of study, and departments, online.Foreword is hosted and produced by Alison Innes for the Faculty of Humanities at Brock University.Sound design and editing by Serena Atallah. Theme music is by Khalid Imam.Special thanks to Brock University’s MakerSpace and Brock University Marketing and Communications for studio and web support.This podcast is financially supported by the Faculty of Humanities at Brock University.

    • 51 min
    Drug Photography

    Drug Photography

    We’re bombarded by images every day, whether we’re on Instagram or Twitter, reading a newspaper or Googling a recipe. Some images, like pictures of kittens, might make us feel happy. Other images, such as pictures of violence or drug use, might evoke feelings of disgust. But can those pictures also help us become more empathetic?  Dr. Linda Steer from the Department of Visual Art talks about her work on drug photography and how empathy can be a complicated a thing. Join us as we consider how the images we consume can make us more empathetic to others.  Find a full transcript at https://brocku.ca/humanities/forewordLinksEntangled empathy, drug use, and photographs of suffering (International Journal of Drug Policy, Vol. 65 March 2016)New research shows empathy can shape drug policy (Brock News)Ohio police post graphic photo of overdosed parents in SUV with 4-year-old child in backseat (Global News)Linda Steer faculty profileDepartment of Visual Arts, Brock UniversityCreditsWe love to hear from our listeners! Join us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram @brockhumanities.Please subscribe and rate us on your favourite podcasting app so you don’t miss an episode.Learn more about the Faculty of Humanities, including our events, programs of study, and departments, online.Foreword is hosted and produced by Alison Innes for the Faculty of Humanities at Brock University.Sound design and editing by Serena Atallah. Theme music is by Khalid Imam.Special thanks to Brock University’s MakerSpace and Brock University Marketing and Communications for studio and web support.This podcast is financially supported by the Faculty of Humanities at Brock University. 

    • 24 min
    Games

    Games

    Like most people, you might be playing a lot of games these days: board games, video games, or games on your phone. But have you thought about how those games communicate meaning? In this episode we speak with Dr. Jason Hawreliak from Brock’s Centre for Digital Humanities, about how games communicate meaning and even propaganda.  Listen on to hear more about Animal Crossing, Call of Duty, and the field of game studies.  Find a full transcript at https://brocku.ca/humanities/foreword LinksMultimodal Semiotics and Rhetoric in Videogames (Routledge 2018) Playing video games can ease loneliness during the coronavirus pandemic (with Aaron Langille and Charles Daviau; The Conversation) Humanities champions honoured at spring symposium (Brock News) Centre for Digital Humanities, Brock UniversityCreditsWe love to hear from our listeners! Join us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram @brockhumanities.Please subscribe and rate us on your favourite podcasting app so you don’t miss an episode.Learn more about the Faculty of Humanities, including our events, programs of study, and departments, online.Foreword is hosted and produced by Alison Innes for the Faculty of Humanities at Brock University.Sound design and editing by Serena Atallah. Theme music is by Khalid Imam.Special thanks to Brock University’s MakerSpace and Brock University Marketing and Communications for studio and web support.This podcast is financially supported by the Faculty of Humanities at Brock University.

    • 27 min
    Nova Scotia Colonial History

    Nova Scotia Colonial History

    How can we get to know people from the past? Primary sources, like government records, letters and diaries, give historians valuable insight into human experiences of the past and making connections with modern crises. Episode four of Foreword features a conversation with Danny Samson, an Associate Professor of History, about his work on Acadian and Nova Scotian colonial history and shares how historians use primary sources to build a more thorough understanding of past events. Samson discusses his most recent work with his fourth year students on the Acadian expulsion from modern-day Prince Edward Island, which has been receiving international scholarly attention. He shares how his students completed their online project an interactive website Ile St-Jean: The Expulsion of 1758, which details the forcible deportation of thousands of Acadians from modern-day Prince Edward Island using primary forces, despite having their semester disrupted by the pandemic. Samson also talks about his ongoing project studying the diary of James Barry, a nineteenth-century miller in rural Nova Scotia. Analysis of Barry’s diary shows his connection with intellectual ideas and debates and politics in pre-Confederation Nova Scotia, as well as giving insight into the role of the miller in a small rural community. Find a full transcript at https://brocku.ca/humanities/foreword LinksIle St-Jean: The Expulsion of 1758 (2020) History course gains international scholarly attention for groundbreaking work (Brock News, 20 May 2020) Daniel Samson faculty profile @ruralcolonialns Daniel Samson on Twitter; see also #JamesBarryDiary  Department of HistoryCreditsWe love to hear from our listeners! Join us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram @brockhumanities.Please subscribe and rate us on your favourite podcasting app so you don’t miss an episode.Learn more about the Faculty of Humanities, including our events, programs of study, and departments, online.Foreword is hosted and produced by Alison Innes for the Faculty of Humanities at Brock University.Sound design and editing by Serena Atallah. Theme music is by Khalid Imam.Special thanks to Brock University’s MakerSpace and Brock University Marketing and Communications for studio and web support.This podcast is financially supported by the Faculty of Humanities at Brock University.   

    • 30 min
    Quotable: Data Privacy and Surveillance Capitalism

    Quotable: Data Privacy and Surveillance Capitalism

    As we live more of our lives online, data privacy issues become more important. Who is collecting our data and what are they doing with it? Aaron Mauro, Assistant Professor with the Centre for Digital Humanities, spoke about identity and surveillance captalism with social media intern Hayley Wilhelm for this bonus mini episode.LinksWorking from home during the pandemic creates new cybersecurity threats (The Conversation, 9 April 2020) Coronavirus contact tracing poses serious threats to our privacy (The Conversation, 10 May 2020) Canadians need to consider implications of COVID-19 surveillance, says Brock prof (Brock News, 21 April 2020) @onthename Aaron Mauro on Twitter Dr. Aaron Mauro website Centre for Digital HumanitiesCreditsWe love to hear from our listeners! Join us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram @brockhumanities. Please subscribe and rate us on your favourite podcasting app so you don’t miss an episode. Learn more about the Faculty of Humanities, including our events, programs of study, and departments, online. Foreword is hosted and produced by Alison Innes for the Faculty of Humanities at Brock University. Sound design and editing by Serena Atallah. Theme music is by Khalid Imam. Special thanks to Brock University’s MakerSpace and Brock University Marketing and Communications for studio and web support. This podcast is financially supported by the Faculty of Humanities at Brock University.  

    • 7 min

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