7 episodes

Philadelphia is a treasure trove of stories. Many of these stories are hidden in plain sight. We walk by them everyday and don’t see them. Other stories we think we know, but we don’t look close enough to see the details. The Found in Philadelphia podcast aims to bring these stories into focus, to introduce you to the places and people of Philadelphia, and to help you see the city with new eyes. Each story will highlight a moment in Philadelphia’s past that still impacts us today. Every episode will take you on a field trip in the city that you can experience for yourself. Find out more at foundinphiladelphia.com.

Found in Philadelphia Found in Philadelphia

    • History
    • 4.8 • 81 Ratings

Philadelphia is a treasure trove of stories. Many of these stories are hidden in plain sight. We walk by them everyday and don’t see them. Other stories we think we know, but we don’t look close enough to see the details. The Found in Philadelphia podcast aims to bring these stories into focus, to introduce you to the places and people of Philadelphia, and to help you see the city with new eyes. Each story will highlight a moment in Philadelphia’s past that still impacts us today. Every episode will take you on a field trip in the city that you can experience for yourself. Find out more at foundinphiladelphia.com.

    Episode No. 7 – Women and the Centennial

    Episode No. 7 – Women and the Centennial

    Women are organizing to fund raise for the 1876 Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia, a moment when our city and our nation will be at the center of an international stage. The United States will be celebrating 100 years since the signing of the Declaration of Independence. The country has just survived a bloody Civil War and is in the middle of Reconstruction. But questions remain about whose country this is anyway, who has the right to lead, and whose role it is to serve. Black American women in Philadelphia have some very clear ideas about that, but they don’t always agree on how best to achieve their goals within the narrow options that are available.







    This story is about Philadelphia in the 1870s, but it remains relevant today. It’s about inclusion, what it means to be an American citizen, and whose histories matter. For those in positions of power, for those talking about being “inclusive,” this story has some powerful lessons for us today.







    Links:







    Find out more and see a full bibliography and additional images in the companion blog for this episode at https://foundinphiladelphia.com/.







    You can attend actor Shav’on Smith’s “Tea with Frederick Douglass” event at the Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion at https://ebenezermaxwellmansion.org/tea-with-frederick-douglass/







    Please participate in the Found in Philadelphia podcast survey here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/Y23Q8S5







    And for some additional visuals for this episode, you can check out the podcast on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/found.in.philadelphia/

    • 33 min
    Episode No. 6 – Philadelphia Public Schools and Caroline Le Count: Part 2

    Episode No. 6 – Philadelphia Public Schools and Caroline Le Count: Part 2

    Philadelphia, 1867. A 21-year-old Black woman was recently appointed principal of a new public school on a small alley in the Seventh Ward. This woman is Caroline Le Count, and she will go on to build the largest Philadelphia public school with an all Black student body, and an all Black teaching staff. But Le Count’s successful experiment will be short lived, and we are still living with the consequences of that fallout today.







    In the years following the Civil War, Philadelphia invested in its public school system and developed new types of schools. We might recognize some of these today. They included “normal” schools for training teachers, industrial schools for the skilled trades, select magnet high schools, and night schools for adults.







    Pioneering African-American educators saw an opportunity to create good public schools for the Black community as well. They knew that all Black schools were needed in order to create jobs for Black teachers, who could not teach at all white, or mixed schools. The educator activist, Caroline Le Count, dedicated her career to establishing one of these all Black schools, and to fiercely defending and advocating for her fellow Black, public school teachers. This is the second of two episodes that looks at Le Count’s legacy in public education and what we can learn from it.







    Links:Please participate in the Found in Philadelphia podcast survey here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/Y23Q8S5







    You can attend Shav’on Smith’s “Tea with Frederick Douglass” event at the Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion at https://ebenezermaxwellmansion.org/tea-with-frederick-douglass/







    Find out more and see a full bibliography and additional images in the companion blog for this episode at https://foundinphiladelphia.com/.







    And for some additional visuals for this episode, you can check out the podcast on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/found.in.philadelphia/

    • 36 min
    Episode No. 5 – Philadelphia Public Schools and Caroline R. Le Count: Part 1

    Episode No. 5 – Philadelphia Public Schools and Caroline R. Le Count: Part 1

    In this city, there are very different educational opportunities for the wealthy and the poor. But reformers and activists are trying to find ways to provide an education for all children.  It is the beginning of a colossal and imperfect experiment in publicly-funded schools in nineteenth-century Philadelphia.







    One group in particular, Black Philadelphians, was determined not to be left out of this educational experiment. They undertook studies to understand in detail the state of education in their community. And they invested in training a new generation of teachers, who were ready to take charge in the years following the Civil War. Some of the best and brightest worked to create quality schools for Black children within this emerging public school system. One of these educators and activists was the formidable Caroline Le Count. This episode is part of a series on Le Count, this late-nineteenth century educator and activist. It is the first of two episodes that will look at Le Count’s legacy in public education.







    Find out more and see a full bibliography in the companion blog for this episode at https://foundinphiladelphia.com/. And for some additional visuals for this episode, you can check out the podcast on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/found.in.philadelphia/

    • 24 min
    Episode No. 4 – The Life and Times of Caroline R. Le Count: Part 2

    Episode No. 4 – The Life and Times of Caroline R. Le Count: Part 2

    A city at war with a not-so-distant enemy, hospitals overwhelmed and spilling over into temporary tents, nurses asking citizens to donate critical supplies, it’s Philadelphia in 1863.







    Philadelphia was central to the Union war machine during the Civil War, but that doesn’t mean it was a bastion of abolitionist sentiment. As the war exposes deep inequality in the city, some citizens see an opportunity to push for change on the streets of Philadelphia. So, even as the city is organizing and mobilizing for the war effort to the south, the city’s own streetcars are becoming the frontlines of a battle for civil rights. Philadelphia’s Black women are putting their bodies on the line in this fight. And like any battle, there is violence, murder, and those left to carry on.







    This episode is the second in a three-part series on the life of one of these women, Caroline Le Count. Find out more in the companion blog post to this episode at https://foundinphiladelphia.com/. And if you enjoyed the episode, I’d love it if you left a review in your podcast app.

    • 32 min
    Episode No. 3 – The Life and Times of Caroline R. Le Count: Part 1

    Episode No. 3 – The Life and Times of Caroline R. Le Count: Part 1

    An important moment of the Civil Rights movement happened right here in Philadelphia, and it took place nearly 100 years earlier than the well-known demonstrations of the twentieth century.







    Philadelphia in the 1860s was a city on the move. The city was growing fast and developing new city-wide services, but progress wasn’t being felt equally by all of its residents. Philadelphia’s free Black population was discriminated against and was excluded from the city’s progress. In response, Black residents of the Seventh Ward established their own system of schools, banks, libraries, and healthcare. However, during the turmoil of the Civil War, Black residents seized the moment to upend the status quo in Philadelphia. The battlefront was on the streets of Philly, and those in the front lines were Black women, ready for the fight.   







    This episode is the first in a three-part series on the life of one of those women, Caroline Le Count. Find out more in the companion blog post to this episode at https://foundinphiladelphia.com/

    • 34 min
    Episode 2: The Aftermath of the Germantown Protest

    Episode 2: The Aftermath of the Germantown Protest

    Early colonial Philadelphia was a place of contention. Colonists had strong opinions about what this Quaker experiment should look like, and they didn’t always agree. From its earliest days, Philadelphia was a diverse place with class divisions, religious discord, and economic inequality. These fractures in the young colony were intensified by the practice of slavery by the wealthy Quaker elite. But Philadelphia was also a center of dogged, grass-roots activism and resistance, especially in the newly founded settlement of Germantown.

    Find out more at https://foundinphiladelphia.com/

    • 31 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
81 Ratings

81 Ratings

PhillyAmanda ,

Philly love

Love this city and this podcast was a great way to learn new history that I didn’t know.

Jayphilly01 ,

Wow this is a great Podcast!

Wow this is a great Podcast! I enjoy learning about history of Philadelphia.

AlleyParis ,

Fantastic

I’m thrilled I found this. Really well researched & produced with captivating storytelling. Excited for more!

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