261 episodes

Once named: What Does The Prayer Really Say? - Commentary on Catholic issues & slavishly accurate liturgical translations - by Fr. John Zuhlsdorf o{]:¬)

Fr. Z's Blog - PODCAzTs Fr. John Zuhlsdorf

    • Christianity
    • 4.9, 83 Ratings

Once named: What Does The Prayer Really Say? - Commentary on Catholic issues & slavishly accurate liturgical translations - by Fr. John Zuhlsdorf o{]:¬)

    OLDIE PODCAzT 36: St. Augustine on John the Baptist; The Vespers hymn “Ut queant laxis”

    OLDIE PODCAzT 36: St. Augustine on John the Baptist; The Vespers hymn “Ut queant laxis”

    New word for the day: hexachord



    I think my production skills have improved a bit since then!







     











    OLDIE TEXT Originally: 24 June 2007



    Our PODCAzT for this Solemnity of the Nativity of John the Baptist presents a selection from sermon (s. 288) preached by St. Augustine of Hippo (+430) in Carthage in 401. 



    This is not the same selection as you find in the Novus Ordo Office of Readings today (from s. 293).



    Then we get into the wonderful hymn for Vespers as well as a very hot

    blessing for the day from the pre-Conciliar Rituale Romanum.

    • 29 min
    OLDIE PODCAzT 084: Quo Primum of St. Pius V (1570) and the Missale Romanum – “henceforth, now, and forever”

    OLDIE PODCAzT 084: Quo Primum of St. Pius V (1570) and the Missale Romanum – “henceforth, now, and forever”

    I've been getting questions about the infamous "survey" sent out to bishops about Summorum Pontificum and its implementation (or more likely NOT!) in their dioceses.  I wrote about it HERE.   The important thing is not to panic and act like a loon about this.



    However, my real point is that some people are raising the question of Pius V's Quo primum.  Given that the "survey" is under discussion, and given that the Feast of St. Pius V is coming up on 5 May (in the traditional calendar), I've dredged up an old PODCAzT in which I talk about and read Quo primum.  This is from 2009... !  Tempus fugit.







    On this feast of St. Pope Pius V (+1572) I drill into one of his most famous acts as Roman Pontiff.  Today we look into and listen to his Apostolic Constitution Quo primum, by which he promulgated the editio princeps of the Missale Romanum.   



    Of course there was an somewhat different version in an edition prior to the 1570 edition, in 1474, but for all our purposes, the 1570 is the first.



    This history changing document came out of turbulent times.  The Council of Trent had just closed and Pius, as Pope, was tasked with the standardization of the Church's liturgy as a bulwark against attacks on the Catholic Faith on many fronts.   Catholic identity was shaken by the theological revolt in the north, uncertain teachings, lack of unity in the expression of worship and even the menace of invasion by Islamic armies.



    Because there is a reciprocal relation between what we believe and how we pray, our worship plays a key role in the shaping and maintaining of our Catholic identity in a difficult world.



    However, centuries after the editio princeps of the "Tridentine" Roman Missal, decades after Paul VI issued his own Apostolic Constitution for the promulgation of the so-called Novus Ordo of the Roman Rite, confusing claims remain about the juridical force of Pius V's Quo primum.



    Some people maintained that Paul VI absolutely abolished the older, traditional "Tridentine" form of Mass with his own Constitution Missale Romanum.



    Some people maintain that Pius V's Quo primum can never be abrogated or abolished or modified even by other Popes and that it still has force of law.



    While not trying to get too canonical, we drill into the questions, draw some conclusions, and hear the words of Pius V in their 16th century splendor.



    You may surprised at how modern some of the saintly Pope's actions sound.







    UPDATE:



    No sooner did I post but I get a text saying that Taylor Marshall and Tim Flanders were talking about QUO PRIMUM live on YouTube, which explains why I was getting questions.



    I'll listen to their comments later.

    • 44 min
    PASCHALCAzT 54: Low Sunday “in albis”: “The Easter lesson comes down to our own lives.”

    PASCHALCAzT 54: Low Sunday “in albis”: “The Easter lesson comes down to our own lives.”

    Today is the Easter Octave Sunday, or Dominica in albis, for the white baptismal garments of those who were recently baptized.  It is sometimes called “Thomas Sunday” because of the Gospel reading about the "doubting" Apostle.  It is also famously called “Quasimodo Sunday” for the first word of the opening chant, the Introit (cf. 1 Peter 2:2-3).

    It is called “Low Sunday” probably in contrast to the hoopla of last Sunday.

    Oh yes… now it is often called “Mercy Sunday” because of the emphasis on the dimension of the mercy of God’s redemptive act celebrated at Easter. The newest, third edition of the Missale Romanum of 2002 specifically labels this Sunday: Dominica II Paschae seu de divina Misericordia.



    The Roman Station is St. Pancras on the Gianicolo Hill.



    Today we wrap things up in the final podcast for Lent and Easter cycle, with wisdom from Card. Bacci and from Fulton J. Sheen.





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    I provide these podcasts especially in gratitude to benefactors.

    • 4 min
    PASCHALCAzT 53: Easter Saturday: The white garment

    PASCHALCAzT 53: Easter Saturday: The white garment

    Today is Easter Saturday!



    The Roman Station is St. John Lateran.  We were here one week ago for the Vigil of Easter.



    I rant a little and then share something related to my rant from Fr. Troadec's books.





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    I provide these podcasts especially in gratitude to benefactors.

    • 4 min
    PASCHALCAzT 52: Easter Friday: Of demons and altars

    PASCHALCAzT 52: Easter Friday: Of demons and altars

    Today is Easter Friday!



    The Roman Station is Santa Maria ad martyres, once the ancient temple to all the pagan gods, the Pantheon.



    I rant a little, and do not exclude my observations about Pachamama on the altar of St. Peter's Basilica.



    The wonderful nuns of Gower Abbey take us in and out… toward the Ascension.



    US HERE – UK HERE







     





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    I provide these podcasts especially in gratitude to benefactors.

    • 4 min
    PASCHALCAzT 51: Easter Thursday: “How many Easters have we spent?”

    PASCHALCAzT 51: Easter Thursday: “How many Easters have we spent?”

    Today is Easter Thursday!



    The Roman Station is Santi Dodici Apostoli, the Twelve Holy Apostles.  The relics of the Apostles James the Lesser and Philip are here.  Also, find the tomb of Pope Clement XIV, who suppressed the Jesuits.



    Card. Bacci gives us a sobering thought in the midst of our Easter joy.  Fr. Patrick Troadec of the SSPX presents Mary Magdalene and her great love for Christ.



    Today I'm still thinking of Paris and the yesterday's anniversary of the burning of the Cathedral of Notre-Dame in Paris.  I used a recording of the Cathedral's bells yesterday.  Today, we are back in Paris, listening to, among other things, the bells of Saint-Nicholas du Chardonnay.





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    I provide these podcasts especially in gratitude to benefactors.

    • 4 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
83 Ratings

83 Ratings

PowerMacDaddy ,

Compact and powerful

Each of Fr Z’s episodes are short but full of wonderful bits and pieces. Sometimes I re-listen several times because I catch myself meditating on one thing and miss the next 30 seconds or minute that are full of other worthy bones for mental chewing. Many other podcasts go on and on for an hour or hour and a half and it takes forever for them to get to a point, or they talk one thing to death. Fr Z doesn’t have that problem. The Christmas and Lenten series’s are always wonderful and I look forward to each one.

Strider3000 ,

Music!

Please post descriptions of the music you use so we can get the albums - thanks

Kaiwen Tsang ,

Unsubscribing

I will now be unsubscribing from this podcast because this podcast takes to many teachings from heretics such as Ratzinger. And the producers affiliation with the Novus Ordo sect is disturbing. To save my soul I will now subscribe to sedevacantism because Bergoglio is a filthy and perverse heretic as anyone with half a brain can plainly see. If one believes Bergoglio is a legitimate pope...one should also believe that Judas Iscariot is a holy and great Apostle.

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