77 episodes

Please come along! As of April 2019, #WiseGirl has rebranded as #ReRooted and can now be found with new podcasts posted every other Friday on Ram Dass's Be Here Now Network at: https://beherenownetwork.com/category/francesca-maxime/
and on my website https://www.maximeclarity.com/podcast

My podcast still sits at the intersection of mindfulness, psychology, neuroscience, the creative arts and social justice. ReRooted: Unearthing Our Natural Radiance, And Remembering The Roots We Share

Welcome to the ReRooted Podcast with Francesca Maximé, trauma-sensitive mindfulness meditation teacher and poet. Together we’ll take a closer look at approaches to transforming trauma with insights from psychology, neuroscience, spirituality, social justice and the creative arts. Join Francesca and her guests for an exploration of our shared connection and how we can cultivate greater compassion for ourselves and for others.
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#WiseGirl is where we invite you to discover your own inner wise girl or wise guy -- the wisdom within that has always been there, deep inside. The show aims to help us connect to our wisest self, to help guide us through our interconnected lives, with respect and compassion. WiseGirl aims to help us understand why we do what we do, and how we can relate to things differently so we can shift into a new way of being: to go from surviving to thriving.

About me: Brooklyn-based TV personality, certified mindfulness meditation teacher, and wellbeing and life coach: Creating Space for Wellbeing & Mindful Brooklyn. Journalist, poet/author/writer. Haitian-Dominican Italian-American. Harvard. Cats. Tennis. Yoga. Gratitude. Love.

Francesca Maximé: WiseGirl Francesca Maximé

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 4.6 • 12 Ratings

Please come along! As of April 2019, #WiseGirl has rebranded as #ReRooted and can now be found with new podcasts posted every other Friday on Ram Dass's Be Here Now Network at: https://beherenownetwork.com/category/francesca-maxime/
and on my website https://www.maximeclarity.com/podcast

My podcast still sits at the intersection of mindfulness, psychology, neuroscience, the creative arts and social justice. ReRooted: Unearthing Our Natural Radiance, And Remembering The Roots We Share

Welcome to the ReRooted Podcast with Francesca Maximé, trauma-sensitive mindfulness meditation teacher and poet. Together we’ll take a closer look at approaches to transforming trauma with insights from psychology, neuroscience, spirituality, social justice and the creative arts. Join Francesca and her guests for an exploration of our shared connection and how we can cultivate greater compassion for ourselves and for others.
***
#WiseGirl is where we invite you to discover your own inner wise girl or wise guy -- the wisdom within that has always been there, deep inside. The show aims to help us connect to our wisest self, to help guide us through our interconnected lives, with respect and compassion. WiseGirl aims to help us understand why we do what we do, and how we can relate to things differently so we can shift into a new way of being: to go from surviving to thriving.

About me: Brooklyn-based TV personality, certified mindfulness meditation teacher, and wellbeing and life coach: Creating Space for Wellbeing & Mindful Brooklyn. Journalist, poet/author/writer. Haitian-Dominican Italian-American. Harvard. Cats. Tennis. Yoga. Gratitude. Love.

    LIVE WEBINAR REPLAY: Mindful Anti-Racism: Finding Relational Connection Beneath Shame & Saviorism

    LIVE WEBINAR REPLAY: Mindful Anti-Racism: Finding Relational Connection Beneath Shame & Saviorism

    If you're so inclined.. Please sign up for my new Embodied Antiracism Class starting Oct. 21st 2p ET https://therapywisdom.com/embodied-anti-racism/

    This is the live webinar replay we recorded October 14th!

    In this webinar we discussed...
    How to avoid getting lost in the 'shame spiral'

    Using our nervous systems as a tool to bring ourselves into balance as we lean into doing anti-racism work

    Implementing our anti-racism work from a grounded place that allows us to be fully present
    The intersection of this work and Stephen Porges' Polyvagal Theory
    Identifying and welcoming out parts

    Recognizing the role parts play in our capacity to feel more balanced and connected

    If you like this webinar, please consider signing up to my 5-week embodied antiracism course beginning Wednesday Oct 21 at 2pm ET with special guests Drs. Jack Kornfield, Dick Schwartz, Shelley Harrell, Natasha Stovall, & Susan Cousins

    https://therapywisdom.com/embodied-anti-racism/ or email me at www.maximeclarity.com with any questions!

    • 1 hr 30 min
    Not Equal w/ Dr. Diane Goodman, Exploring Black-Jewish Solidarity - ReRooted Ep. 37

    Not Equal w/ Dr. Diane Goodman, Exploring Black-Jewish Solidarity - ReRooted Ep. 37

    Dr. Diane Goodman joins Francesca to talk about why it is important to distinguish our different experiences, especially among and between Black and Jewish folks.
    Trainer, consultant, professor, speaker, author, and activist, Diane Goodman has been addressing issues of diversity and social justice for over 30 years. As a trainer and consultant, Diane and her associates have worked with a wide range of organizations, community groups, and educational institutions to build their capacity around diversity and social justice issues. Using a participatory approach, she helps people increase their awareness, knowledge, and skills to foster equity and inclusion. Programs address how cultural differences and issues of power and privilege affect individuals, interpersonal relationships, and organizational culture and practices. She offers practical strategies and skills to enable people to create more positive intergroup relations, and institutional and societal change.As a regular presenter at national and international conferences, Diane has offered institutes and sessions at NCORE (National Conference on Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Higher Education), Teachers College Roundtable on Multicultural Psychology and Education, The White Privilege Conference, The Diversity Challenge, AAC&U (Association of American Colleges and Universities), Association of Contemplative Mind in Higher Education (ACMHE), Creating Change, NAME (National Association for Multicultural Education), ACPA, NASPA, among others. She also gives talks and keynote speeches. Diane earned a B.A. from Tufts University in Psychology and Child Development and an M.Ed. and Ed.D. from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst with a focus on social justice education, group and organizational development, and counseling. Her humor, openness, insight, and compassion make her sessions engaging and meaningful. Learn more about at dianegoodman.com
    Not Equal
    Francesca and Dr. Goodman explore the complications that arise when we equate our own trauma and suffering to others.

    “There is a very real reality of anti-Semitism and that is different than the very real reality of racism and anti-blackness.” – Dr. Diane Goodman

    The Privilege of a Lighter Pallete (22:55)
    Dr. Goodman talks about the ways that Jews who look like her can sometimes benefit from being identified as white by others.

    “I think that it is really important, and this is what I try to do when I work with white Jews – is to both recognize the reality of anti-Semitism and the reality of white privilege, and that Jews have been able to assimilate with whiteness.” – Dr. Diane Goodman

    Francesca Maximé explores roots deeper than whiteness on ReRooted Ep. 14

    https://dianegoodman.com/

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Dr. Jacqueline Battalora: ReRooted – Ep. 39 – The Invention of White People with Francesca Maximé

    Dr. Jacqueline Battalora: ReRooted – Ep. 39 – The Invention of White People with Francesca Maximé

    Francesca Maximé welcomes Jacqueline Battalora for a conversation around how the invention of the idea of “white people” became the foundation of America’s institutionalized racism.
    Jacqueline Battalora is the author of Birth of a White Nation: The Invention of White People and Its Relevance Today. While she is currently a lawyer and professor of sociology and criminal justice at Saint Xavier University, she is also a former Chicago Police officer. She holds a Ph.D. from Northwestern University and has been engaged in anti-racist training since the mid-1990s. Learn more about Jacqueline here.

    Dr. Jacqueline Battalora https://jbattalora.com/

    This fall, (ReRooted podcast host) Francesca Maximé is offering a 5-week embodied antiracism online course through the Academy of Therapy Wisdom launching in October. Please sign up for 90 minutes of FREE antiracism teaching videos offered by Francesca in late September. You’re also invited to sign up for the course launching with a FREE 60 minute LIVE antiracism webinar conversation with Francesca October 14th, with the course beginning October 21st. Sign up for your free 3 embodied antiracism video teachings from Francesca at: Therapy Wisdom
    The Invention of White People
    Francesca welcomes Jacqueline to ReRooted, and the two discuss how non-white people in America are most adversely affected by two institutions that are very visible in our current times: law enforcement and health care. Jacqueline talks about what white supremacy really means, and how the term “white people” didn’t even exist until after Bacon’s Rebellion in 1676.

    “It’s institutionalized white supremacy, and it’s nobody’s fault. It was here before we all arrived… it is a baked-in feature of this country… every law and policy that has been birthed out of this country is built upon a foundation of white supremacy.” – Jacqueline Battalora

    Race relations expert Daryl Davis talks about bringing down the walls of hatred on Mindrolling Ep. 360
    The Pervasiveness of Whiteness (23:13)
    Francesca and Jacqueline cover a series of laws enacted after Bacon’s Rebellion as a divide and conquer campaign by the ruling elite to ensure no further rebellions. These laws were all cruel and dehumanizing, and meant to ensure white people a position of power and cultural pervasiveness that has lasted throughout the history of America.

    “Being born into a culture that enacts whiteness, every moment of every day through literally every institution, how that lands upon and shapes white people is such that it diminishes our humanity.” – Jacqueline Battalora



    The Empathy Gap (41:23)

    Jacqueline shares the story of the moment she realized she had more empathy for white lives than those of people of color, and how that changed her life. She talks about her work as a police officer in Chicago during the tail end of the crack epidemic, and how that influenced her work today. Francesca and Jacqueline end the show with a discussion of how significant this legal policy of whiteness has been throughout this nation’s history.

    “Even though now those racially unequal policies and laws have been removed, the consequences of those laws continue to promote economic inequality today.” – Jacqueline Battalora

    https://jbattalora.com/

    • 1 hr 10 min
    Dr. Bruce Perry, MD, PhD: The Physiology of Belonging. ReRooted podcast Ep. 38 w/ Francesca Maximé

    Dr. Bruce Perry, MD, PhD: The Physiology of Belonging. ReRooted podcast Ep. 38 w/ Francesca Maximé

    Dr. Bruce Perry and Francesca explore how the physiology of belonging heals the colonized traumas of cultural fragmentation and implicit bias.
    Dr. Perry is the Senior Fellow of The ChildTrauma Academy a Community of Practice based in Houston, TX, and Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago. He is the author of The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog, Born For Love: Why Empathy is Essential and Endangered, and BRIEF: Reflections on Childhood, Trauma and Society. Over the last thirty years, Dr. Perry has been an active teacher, clinician and researcher in children’s mental health and neuroscience. You can find more information at https://www.bdperry.com/ and https://www.childtrauma.org/ and https://www.neurosequential.com/

    This fall, Francesca is offering a 5-week embodied antiracism online course through the Academy of Therapy Wisdom launching in October. Please sign up for 90 minutes of FREE antiracism teaching videos offered by Francesca in late September. You’re also invited to sign up for the course launching with a FREE 60 minute LIVE antiracism webinar conversation with Francesca October 14th, with the course beginning October 21st. Sign up for your free 3 embodied antiracism video teachings from Francesca at: https://therapywisdom.pages.ontraport.net/fm-courageous-heart and learn more about Francesca’s embodied antiracism offerings at www.maximeclarity.com/resources

    The Physiology of Belonging and Disconnection
    Exploring his time with the Māori people, Dr. Perry elucidates the nature of our physiology in relation to belonging. A sense of belonging quiets your physiology and sparks neuroendocrine processes that make your organs more flexible, adaptive, and functional. When you don’t feel as if you belong, when you’re getting signals that you’re not seen or heard, it literally makes your physiology different, you become more distressed and increase the risk for disconnection.

    “The conceptualization of disease is disconnection. It’s disconnection from community or disconnection from being out of sync with nature. All of the healing processes involve reconnecting with the rhythms of nature, reconnecting with the people that you belong with.” – Dr. Bruce Perry

    Open yourself to Indigenous wisdom, learn to begin to heal cultural wounds, decolonize your mind, and transform through listening on Ep.355 of Mindrolling
    Colonization, Cultural Fragmentation, Resilience, & Trauma (22:28)
    When colonization and slavery destroyed and stripped away Indigenous communities, there was a powerful fragmentation of the cultural and community anchors that helped individuals feel like they belonged and kept them healthy. Dr. Perry shares that if you look at any First Nations or Indigenous community across the planet that has been colonized and has this cultural fragmentation, there are two things present: Resilience and Trauma.

    “To survive literally decades and generations of intentional genocide and cultural genocide; that’s pretty resilient. The second thing is, because of this fragmentation of physiological meaningful anchors of family and culture, there are higher rates of trauma-related, or stress related, health-issues.” – Dr. Bruce Perry

    • 1 hr 10 min
    Online Finding Freedom: White Women Taking On Our Own White Supremacy: #ReRooted Ep. 36

    Online Finding Freedom: White Women Taking On Our Own White Supremacy: #ReRooted Ep. 36

    Evangeline Weiss and Kari Points join Francesca to discuss finding freedom and taking on racism, patriarchy, and white supremacy as white women.
    Evangeline Weiss and Kari Points are the founders and facilitators of Finding Freedom: White Women Taking On Our Own White Supremacy. Evangeline is the founder of Beyond Conflict Inc, a social justice consulting firm, and the Leadership Programs Director at the National LGBTQ Task Force. Kari is a member of the Leadership Team of Showing Up for Racial Justice and the Poor and Working Class Crew of Triangle SURJ. Together, they are working to undo the entrenched legacy of white supremacy to help cultivate collective liberation.

    White Women Finding Freedom
    Sparked by the racist, misogynistic truths uncovered through the 2016 election, Evangeline and Kari were inspired to start doing work within their community surrounding white women and racism. They felt it was important to start speaking to what it means to live at the intersection of being a white women in today’s society, and what it looks like to undo white supremacy from the inside out.

    “We wanted a deeper vision for white women, of who we can be in a racial justice movement, who we can be in the world, and how we can see into our future selves and recognize that we get to make choices about who we are, and we can actively create a collective identity for white women that counters the narratives.” – Evangeline Weiss

    Learn to decondition yourself from the imprints of the cultural operating system, and find a sense of belonging on Ep.129 of the Metta Hour
    Ancestors, Elders, Pillars (4:55)
    Growing up, most white people didn’t have white elders to show us how to be anti-racist, or talk about racism or whiteness. Often, the recognition comes to us belatedly as adults that there may be a history of white people who resisted racism and patriarchy in the past. Kari explores the powerful stories of Anne Braden and Jane Elliot as examples that there is an inherent ancestral lineage of white elders who have paved the way in fighting for racial justice.

    “It’s powerful for white people to realize that we are not the first ones or the only ones who are fighting for racial justice. We are part of a legacy. We have ancestors who have been doing this for a long time, and it is part of who we are and who we can be in the world. We can rely on and lean on our ancestors to show us the way.” – Kari Points

    Uproot historical systemic oppression and decolonize your mind, all while honoring the ancestors with a South African shaman on Ep.355 of Mindrolling
    The Comfort of Not Questioning
    Evangeline and Kari explore the manufactured creation of Blackness and Whiteness as a result of the U.S. colonies and slavery, and how through this recognition we can begin to uproot these already deeply entrenched systems.

    “It’s helpful to understand that these aren’t things that existed since the beginning of time. They are not natural, or normal, or required, or something that develops out of the ground. We created it. Humans created it, which means human can undo it.” – Kari Points

    “Do we need the police to look this way to feel safe in a community? What makes a community unsafe? Asking those questions in a way that takes race into consideration is a way of pushing back on this white supremacist history and inheritance that most of us have lived with and accepted the comfort of not questioning.” –Evangeline Weiss

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Decolonizing Mental Health with Dr. Manuel X. Zamarripa: #ReRooted – Ep. 34

    Decolonizing Mental Health with Dr. Manuel X. Zamarripa: #ReRooted – Ep. 34

    Dr. Manuel X. Zamarripa joins Francesca to discuss destigmatizing mental health, healing intergenerational trauma, and decolonizing language.
    Dr. Manuel X. Zamarripa, LPC-S is the director and co-founder of the Institute of Chicana/o Psychology based in Austin, TX where he works with educators and mental health professionals on issues related to Chicanx/Latinx wellness, cultural identity, and mental health from a cultural strengths framework. He is also the Associate Dean of Counseling at Austin Community College District where he coordinates the delivery of mental health services to the student population, assists with the Behavioral Intervention Team, and leads the district’s suicide prevention and crisis response efforts. http://razapsychology.org/

    Destigmatizing and Decolonizing Therapy
    While typical Western modern-day therapy is taught through the lens of Europeans and Freud, when we look historically throughout many cultural backgrounds, there is deep intuitive wisdom that Black, Brown, and Indigenous People have always known there is healing through talk. Dr. Zamarripa looks to destigmatize and decolonize therapy from being primarily a white person service and field, allowing people from multicultural backgrounds to reclaim this legacy.

    “While we need to destigmatize, we also need to decolonize the field. The destigmatization part is for people who are aware and talking to their community. The decolonization part is changing the field, holding the field accountable. You can’t have one without the other.”– Dr. Manuel X. Zamarripa

    For a discussion on identity and oppression, ranging from Freud to liberation psychology, tune into Ep. 28 of ReRooted
    Intergenerational Trauma (18:28)
    Francesca and Dr. Zamarripa explore the reality of healing intergenerational trauma through the long view of the seven generations lens. While we can do a lot of healing in our lifetime, we also have to be patient and gentle with ourselves and our communities. For full healing to occur, it may take multiple generations due to centuries of accumulated trauma. We are invited to remember that wounds take time to heal, and each heals in its own unique way.

    “Intergenerational trauma means multigenerational healing.” – Dr. Manuel X. Zamarripa

    For a conversation around healing multigenerational racial trauma and finding your inner truth, open yourself to Ep. 11 of ReRooted
    Decolonizing Language (35:10)
    How is our language complicit in perpetuating hierarchal, dominator paradigms? Dr. Zamarripa shares examples of how this happens implicitly and consistently in our everyday speech, explaining this as a product of colonization because it involves imposing ways of being and experiencing that may not fit for everyone. Decolonizing is looking at who is sharing that language, who is sharing the framework, and understanding why it’s invisible much of the time, and the importance of making it visible.

    “Language creates reality. What we say isn’t representational of reality. We don’t make words necessarily, or solely, to represent an experience accurately. When we create words and language and we put it out there, we are creating a reality. And so, our language matters.” – Dr. Manuel X. Zamarripa

    Wat​ch the latest Ram Dass Documentary film on Becoming Nobody on Gaia.com. The Gaia.com library supports you with transformational content. See it for yourself and go to Gaia.com/BeHereNow and check out the Be Here Now Playlist curated just for you. Visit Gaia.com/BeHereNow to start your free trial today.

    • 53 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
12 Ratings

12 Ratings

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