68 episodes

Please come along! As of April 2019, #WiseGirl has rebranded as #ReRooted and can now be found with new podcasts posted every other Friday on Ram Dass's Be Here Now Network at: https://beherenownetwork.com/category/francesca-maxime/
and on my website https://www.maximeclarity.com/podcast

My podcast still sits at the intersection of mindfulness, psychology, neuroscience, the creative arts and social justice. ReRooted: Unearthing Our Natural Radiance, And Remembering The Roots We Share

Welcome to the ReRooted Podcast with Francesca Maximé, trauma-sensitive mindfulness meditation teacher and poet. Together we’ll take a closer look at approaches to transforming trauma with insights from psychology, neuroscience, spirituality, social justice and the creative arts. Join Francesca and her guests for an exploration of our shared connection and how we can cultivate greater compassion for ourselves and for others.
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#WiseGirl is where we invite you to discover your own inner wise girl or wise guy -- the wisdom within that has always been there, deep inside. The show aims to help us connect to our wisest self, to help guide us through our interconnected lives, with respect and compassion. WiseGirl aims to help us understand why we do what we do, and how we can relate to things differently so we can shift into a new way of being: to go from surviving to thriving.

About me: Brooklyn-based TV personality, certified mindfulness meditation teacher, and wellbeing and life coach: Creating Space for Wellbeing & Mindful Brooklyn. Journalist, poet/author/writer. Haitian-Dominican Italian-American. Harvard. Cats. Tennis. Yoga. Gratitude. Love.

Francesca Maximé: WiseGirl Francesca Maximé

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 4.6, 12 Ratings

Please come along! As of April 2019, #WiseGirl has rebranded as #ReRooted and can now be found with new podcasts posted every other Friday on Ram Dass's Be Here Now Network at: https://beherenownetwork.com/category/francesca-maxime/
and on my website https://www.maximeclarity.com/podcast

My podcast still sits at the intersection of mindfulness, psychology, neuroscience, the creative arts and social justice. ReRooted: Unearthing Our Natural Radiance, And Remembering The Roots We Share

Welcome to the ReRooted Podcast with Francesca Maximé, trauma-sensitive mindfulness meditation teacher and poet. Together we’ll take a closer look at approaches to transforming trauma with insights from psychology, neuroscience, spirituality, social justice and the creative arts. Join Francesca and her guests for an exploration of our shared connection and how we can cultivate greater compassion for ourselves and for others.
***
#WiseGirl is where we invite you to discover your own inner wise girl or wise guy -- the wisdom within that has always been there, deep inside. The show aims to help us connect to our wisest self, to help guide us through our interconnected lives, with respect and compassion. WiseGirl aims to help us understand why we do what we do, and how we can relate to things differently so we can shift into a new way of being: to go from surviving to thriving.

About me: Brooklyn-based TV personality, certified mindfulness meditation teacher, and wellbeing and life coach: Creating Space for Wellbeing & Mindful Brooklyn. Journalist, poet/author/writer. Haitian-Dominican Italian-American. Harvard. Cats. Tennis. Yoga. Gratitude. Love.

    ISSTD Dr. Michael Yellow Bird & Collectivist & Indigenous ways of Healing

    ISSTD Dr. Michael Yellow Bird & Collectivist & Indigenous ways of Healing

    Dr. Michael Yellow Bird is a Professor of Sociology and the Director of Indigenous Tribal Studies at North Dakota State University. He is a citizen of the Three Affiliated Tribes, (Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara) and joined North Dakota State University faculty in the fall of 2014.

    In our talk for International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation, he talks about the ways Indigenous and collectivist cultures have healed from within for millennia, non-separation and belonging, and more.

    https://www.indigenousmindfulness.com/
    https://news.umanitoba.ca/meet-the-dean-michael-yellow-bird/
    https://umanitoba.ca/faculties/social_work/staff/forms/525.html

    • 50 min
    Dr. Janet Helms

    Dr. Janet Helms

    Dr. Janet E. Helms joins Francesca to explore the historical roots of whiteness and systemic racism, and offer perspective on privilege and racial identity.
    Francesca is joined by Dr. Janet E. Helms to explore the concept of whiteness. White is whiteness? What is white-bodied supremacy? Where did this come from in terms of the history of this country? How does it live in people’s psyches, movements, behaviors, and actions? What kind of research supports different ways of being? These questions are explored among others concerning race relations, gender, patriarchy, autonomy, and freedom.

    Dr. Janet E. Helms is the Augustus Long Professor in the Department of Counseling, Developmental, and Educational Psychology and Director of the Institute for the Study and Promotion of Race and Culture at Boston College.
    Learn more about Dr. Helms:
    https://www.bc.edu/bc-web/schools/lynch-school/faculty-research/faculty-directory/janet-helms.html

    https://www.bc.edu/content/bc-web/schools/lynch-school/sites/isprc.html

    She is past president of the Society of Counseling Psychology. Dr. Helms is an APA Fellow in Counseling Psychology, Ethnic Diversity, and Psychology of Women. In addition, she is a member of the Association of Black Psychologists, the American Psychological Society, and the American Educational Research Association. She has written extensively about race, for laypeople as well as for clinicians.

    Whiteness, Systemic Racism, & The Constitution
    Dr. Helms and Francesca share on how the concept of whiteness perpetuates racism in this society, and is rooted even in The US Constitution, which actually protects white male heterosexual privilege. Systemic racism has to do with the protection of that privilege, where all the rules, policies, and social practices are essentially designed to protect white male heterosexual privilege. This is rarely in the common vernacular because its recognition poses a threat to the people who have privilege from birth.

    “Whenever we change a rule about systemic racism in this society, we threaten someone who’s white, and so I think it’s really important for us to begin to think about what is the threat, because if we can understand why white people feel threatened then we can maybe help them understand how they can change themselves in ways so that they’re not always afraid of losing something.” – Dr. Janet E. Helms

    Unacknowledged Privilege (5:02)
    Highlighting issues surrounding privilege, Dr. Helms shares that if you are a white person who begins to recognize that you have been treated differently because of your skin color, there becomes a recognition of some responsibility for change, both in yourself and the current societal paradigm. That might not feel so comfortable to give up some of your own privilege, some of your own safety.

    “There are different privileges and each white person has to begin to ask themselves, ‘What is the privilege in my life, and how do I have to change myself in order to share privilege?” – Dr. Janet E. Helms

    Dr. Helms shares that this action is not just reflecting on oneself, but also learning how to change the context in which you exist. Learning to see things from an interconnected, holistic, ecological perspective acts as good medicine.

    “It’s good medicine for everyone, but I think it would be unwise of me not to warn people that people don’t always like to take their medicine. So, as one begins to awaken and try new things, one needs to be aware that other white people might not accept you because you’re challenging social norms. I think; though, that what will happen eventually is that if enough white people begin to challenge those social normals, then this challenging will become the norm, rather than the colorblindness that now seems to exist.” – Dr. Janet E. Helms

    • 1 hr 5 min
    ReRooted – Ep. 31 – Racism, Capitalism, and Assimilation w/ Amer F. Ahmed, PhD:

    ReRooted – Ep. 31 – Racism, Capitalism, and Assimilation w/ Amer F. Ahmed, PhD:

    Dr. Amer F. Ahmed joins Francesca to discuss the roots of institutionalized racism under capitalism, and how individualization leads to forced assimilation to white culture, sharing his deep wisdom and rich experience working hands-on with the issues of diversity, equity and inclusion. Their conversation ranges from the very essential topic of institutionalized and anti-Black racism, to the implicit biases we may carry, and all the ways which that may play out structurally within our society, institutions, and families. Francesca and Dr. Ahmed peer into the nuanced layers and intersections surrounding these topics and the effects that they have on different ethnic, identity, and racial groups. Pertaining to these issues, through this conversation we learn how to have necessary conversations from the inside out, while also being able to hold vantage from the outside in. Dr. Ahmed is an organizational strategist who helps institutions and leaders address diversity and inclusion, equity, and intercultural development through consulting, coaching, group facilitation, and keynote speeches. A frequently requested speaker nationwide, Dr. Ahmed’s approach is grounded in a commitment to Inclusive Excellence in organizations and communities. He brings his identity as the son of Indian Muslim immigrants and extensive years as an intercultural and diversity consultant as the sources of a pivotal understanding of the depth of diversity and inclusion work. Throughout his career, Dr. Ahmed has worked with large organizations, higher education institutions, non-profit agencies, schools and community groups to create understanding and change among key constituents and institutional leaders. Dr. Ahmed’s new show, The Eclectic Inclusion Podcast launches July 6th at www.amerfahmed.com

    Capitalism, Forced Assimilation, & the Void of Whiteness
    Why does cultural appropriation run so rampant amongst white society? Dr. Ahmed shares that this is due to white people feeling emptiness within their cultural heritage. He brings up the history of the creation of the concept of race, with “whiteness” being an artificial construct made up in recent history to create an economic and social hierarchal structure within the system of capitalism when immigrants began settling in United States. At first groups like Italians and the Irish weren’t considered white, and suffered racism due to that, so they were left with the choice of either dropping their heritage and ‘becoming white,’ or continuing to suffer because of it. Due to this many white people are left in this void, reaching and searching for heritage and meaning. Since their culture was traded for capitalism, to fill that emptiness white people have grabbed onto cultural appropriation, sticking a price tag on a Buddha statue or peddling yoga in attempt to fill that cultural void, which, in turn, creates a loss of meaning, and ends up devaluing that which is commodified, so that void is never filled. That is why our cultural is stuck in the repetitive and destructive cycle of, “More, more more.”

    “A lot of it is about capitalism. A lot of it is the replacement of identity…There was a choice especially for the marginalized ethnic Europeans of, ‘You either hold on to what you came from and suffer for that…or you assimilate.’ You give up the thing that is sacred to you, which is true for any human being; the values, the things you come from passed down generation after generation; you give that up for economic opportunity and access. Literally to become a manager in the industrialized United States, you needed to assimilate into this version of ‘white’ and you had to live in certain neighborhoods that were deemed white neighborhoods.” – Dr. Ahmed

    • 58 min
    Francesca Maximé – ReRooted – Ep. 30 – Dismantling White Body Supremacy & Becoming Anti-Racist

    Francesca Maximé – ReRooted – Ep. 30 – Dismantling White Body Supremacy & Becoming Anti-Racist

    Francesca Maximé shares her thoughts about the Black Lives Matter protests and explores how American culture was founded around the concept of white body supremacy.
    White Body Supremacy
    In this special edition of ReRooted, Francesca begins by talking about her journey of awakening to the concept of white body supremacy, and how she misunderstood the Black Lives Matter movement at first. But if nirvana is seeing clearly, we all need to commit to the path of seeing racism and white body supremacy clearly.

    “There’s a certain idea of disassociating, like if we don’t talk about it, it doesn’t exist… But there isn’t really this coming out to say, racism is a thing, white body supremacy is a thing. It’s not just for the KKK. It’s for us to understand how, as the Buddha would teach us, ‘not clear seeing’ is the root of the problem.” – Francesca Maximé

    Francesca speaks with Resmaa Menakem about white body supremacy on ReRooted Ep. 13
    A History of Racism (12:40)
    Francesca shares some of her personal experiences with racism, and how she was finally able to start working through the suffering and grief it has caused. She talks about learning the true history of racism in America, and offers some great online courses and resources to help people on their own learning journeys.

    “What is our commitment to our path of liberation? Where does that live? Can we commit to being anti-racist? Being non-racist isn’t working.” – Francesca Maximé

    Resources from this episode: White Awake | Dr. Joy DeGruy | Tara Brach | Maximé Clarity
    ARREAA (24:38)
    Francesca reads a poem she wrote during the height of the Coronavirus pandemic in New York City, and a poem shared by a listener who was wrongfully imprisoned. She talks about a new initiative she’s working on called ARREAA: Anti-Racism Response, Embodiment, Accountability, and Action. Sign up for that here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/107661352002

    “It’s an invitation to name whiteness as the real thing that needs to be interrogated, and to really look at white body supremacy as the elephant in the room, the carbon monoxide that’s killing us all.” – Francesca Maximé

    • 47 min
    ReRooted - IFS's Dick Schwartz: legacy burdens, racism, privilege, activism and healing the planet

    ReRooted - IFS's Dick Schwartz: legacy burdens, racism, privilege, activism and healing the planet

    Richard Schwartz, PhD, is the founding developer of Internal Family Systems (IFS), a therapeutic model that synthesizes systems thinking and the multiplicity of the mind, suggesting alternative ways of understanding psychic functioning and healing.
    Dr. Schwartz co-authored, with Michael Nichols, Family Therapy: Concepts and Methods, the most widely used family therapy text in the United States. He joins Francesca for a timely chat on how the Internal Family Systems Model is evolving to include cultural and collective trauma and legacy burdens. To keep up with Dr. Schwartz ongoing work, visit www.ifs-institute.com

    Legacy Burden
    We take in, often unconsciously, what are called legacy burdens, which come into us through events that happened to our ancestors, ethnic groups, or culture. The parts of us that have been demonized in our culture carry these burdens in terms of extreme beliefs and emotions which came from traumas, but the burdens are not to be confused with the parts or the true nature of these parts. That’s a big mistake that many systems have made, to assume the burden is actually the part. So, the rage isn’t a bundle of rage. It’s a part that tried to stand up to your abuser, and as a result, took on the abuser’s energy to protect you, and now carries all this rage, but that’s not the true nature of the part at all.

    “How you relate to these parts will play out in terms of how you relate to people who resemble those parts. So, if you can have compassion for your rage, then when somebody is raging, you’re going to see that pain that is driving the person, and have compassion for them. If you can be with your exiles, your vulnerable hurting parts, in a loving way, then when somebody is in their exiles you can be there with them too.”

    For a deep dive into identity, oppression, and restorative justice, open yourself to Ep. 28 of ReRooted
    Implicit Racism & Unburdening (9:55)
    Dr. Schwartz discusses how the anti-racism movement has done a lot of good in terms of raising people’s consciousness and bringing issues to the surface, but it has also taught individuals to be very ashamed of their racist parts. There’s nobody in our culture who hasn’t absorbed some racist belief system, so we all have that attached to some part of us. When you are so ashamed of that part that you wind up locking it away and pretending you don’t have it, then it becomes implicit racism, where it has an underground effect on your thoughts and actions, which makes it even more sinister because you aren’t even aware of how it is steering your ship.

    “I would encourage you to go to your racist part, and get all the parts that hate it and fear it to separate to the point that you can be in Self, and be at least curious. You start to talk to that part of yourself about the racist burden it carries, where it got it, and what it’s afraid would happen if it didn’t carry this for you. At some point it decides, often spontaneously, that it doesn’t want to carry this anymore, and then you help ship it out of your system. We have a process we call ‘unburdening’ for doing that, for actually sending these burdens out of the system, at which point the part will transform…It’s my belief that it’s possible to unburden large groups of people simultaneously.”

    • 55 min
    Daniel Gaztambide, PsyD: Identity, Oppression, and Liberation Psychology – ReRooted – Ep. 28

    Daniel Gaztambide, PsyD: Identity, Oppression, and Liberation Psychology – ReRooted – Ep. 28

    Daniel Gaztambide, PsyD joins Francesca to discuss identity, oppression, and A People’s History of Psychoanalysis: From Freud to Liberation Psychology.

    Daniel Gaztambide PsyD is a clinical psychologist who helps professionals feel confident and fulfilled at work and their relationships. He teaches psychotherapy, cultural competency, and critical theory as assistant professor of clinical psychology at the New School for Social Research, where he is the director of the Culture and Mental Health Lab. He is the author of the book A People’s History of Psychoanalysis: From Freud to Liberation Psychology. Learn more about him at www.drgpsychotherapy.com

    Identity Projection
    Daniel shares that identity has to do with a kind of wounding. We are not born having a sense of who or what we are. We discover who or what we are as it is mirrored or reflected in ‘the other.’ Sometimes this is a cracked mirror, reflecting a broken nature within ourselves. What happens when identity is a function of this kind of wounding? What happens when these wounds become weaponized against ourselves and others?

    “Identity is constructed out of different ruptures that occur both interpersonally and intimately, certainly in our family of origin, but also more broadly in terms of signifiers of race, class, sexuality, and gender. The construction of these identities serves a political purpose to maintain systems of control and domination.” -Daniel Gaztambide PsyD

    Within the dynamic of exploitation, an identification with the offender can take place, creating a system of cascading oppression and disparity. As we are classified into our identities, we are exploited for our differences and identifications. Much of this exploitation is overlooked; though, because each specific identity group is riding the exploitation of the one beneath, or next to them. This is the game being played by the current system.

    “We get stuck within the language of oppression itself; winners and losers, oppressors and oppressed. This blinds us to seeing the bigger game being played, which winds up screwing some more than others, but ultimately and dialectically it is screwing everybody.” -Daniel Gaztambide PsyD

    An Everybody-Loses Patriarchy (35:55)
    When we think about gender, we are in an incommensurate battle between men and women. Under the patriarchy, women are paid less for work and devalued, which creates anxiety, depression and ptsd. The same patriarchy reproduces itself by turning men into something called “masculine.” The more that men force themselves to accord with these toxic views of what it means to be a man, the more likely they are to get depression, abuse substances, and commit suicide. Even though the patriarchy may seem skewed, all sides are suffering immensely.

    “What we lose sight of is that both the suffering that women experience and the suffering that men experience, even with all of their privileges, are a function of the same system.” -Daniel Gaztambide PsyD

    For more tools on undoing patriarchy, check out Ep. 18 of the ReRooted
    Restorative Justice & Vulnerability (44:18)
    Social justice is a transformation of an internal wound, and a disidentification with the one who has hurt us, in favor of a loving affectionate tie with an ‘other.’ There is this belief that through humanizing the ‘other’ you can restore your own humanity. In discourses around oppression and liberation, we can sometimes get caught up in a more traditional model of justice, as opposed to restorative justice which restores a sense of wholeness, not just to the individual, but to the community.

    “Across all of these different dimensions there is both wounding and then the privileges afforded to try to cover up that wound. So, it’s about being able to enter that place of recapturing vulnerability. In the same way that you can’t screw me without screwin

    • 1 hr 6 min

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