60 episodes

With over 6000 members and almost 200 attendees each week, Friday Coffee Meetup (FCM) is one of the five largest tech meetups in the LA area. Thanks to the tireless efforts of the group’s 100% volunteer organization team, FCM has held over 300 events, graciously hosted by Cross Campus Pasadena. The free events are designed for the innovation community, and feature speakers on topics related to innovation, entrepreneurship and investing for startups. Presented by Echo-Factory, as part of a larger effort to enhance the local innovation and start-up ecosystem, FCM is open to anyone interested in networking and gaining the kind of knowledge that propels success. Sessions run 8:15 – 9:30am every Friday. Scheduled topics and more info are available at www.fridaycoffeemeetup.com.

youtube

@IPFridayCoffee

Instagram: ipfridaycoffee

FaceBook: FridayMorningCoffeeMeetup

Friday Coffee Meet Up Podcast plasticAudio

    • Education
    • 4.8, 6 Ratings

With over 6000 members and almost 200 attendees each week, Friday Coffee Meetup (FCM) is one of the five largest tech meetups in the LA area. Thanks to the tireless efforts of the group’s 100% volunteer organization team, FCM has held over 300 events, graciously hosted by Cross Campus Pasadena. The free events are designed for the innovation community, and feature speakers on topics related to innovation, entrepreneurship and investing for startups. Presented by Echo-Factory, as part of a larger effort to enhance the local innovation and start-up ecosystem, FCM is open to anyone interested in networking and gaining the kind of knowledge that propels success. Sessions run 8:15 – 9:30am every Friday. Scheduled topics and more info are available at www.fridaycoffeemeetup.com.

youtube

@IPFridayCoffee

Instagram: ipfridaycoffee

FaceBook: FridayMorningCoffeeMeetup

    Episode 123: Virtual Meetup - Moving the Decimal Point for New Space

    Episode 123: Virtual Meetup - Moving the Decimal Point for New Space

    Space exploration is a lot of things. Important. Groundbreaking. Inspiring.

    But cheap isn’t one of them.

    The NASA JPL Curiosity Mars Rover Mission from 2011 had a price tag of $2.5 billion. It’s Artemis program to go back to the moon has a budget of $35-billion.

    Those budgets are doable for large government agencies, but they’re out of the realm of possibility for commercial “new space” applications. In fact, adapting NASA space technologies for commercial applications often means creating significant cost efficiencies, sometimes by a factor of 10. Without sacrificing capability,reliability or flexibility.

    Sound tough?

    It is, but one Pasadena Company has been on both sides of the equation.

    Chris Thayer, the CEO of Motiv Space Systems will tell the story of how the company successfully executed large NASA contracts, like building the primary robotic arm for JPL’s mars 2020 rover, and then used that knowledge, experience and capability to move the cost of those systems nearly one decimal point to the left.

    The result of Chris and Motiv’s work is putting advanced space robotics in reach of commercial applications that could never even consider them before.

    BIO: Chris Thayer
    Chris Thayer is an engineer, and CEO of Motiv Space Systems Inc., in Pasadena. Chris leads the company’s work developing ground, and space-based robotic systems and components. The company’s work includes robotic systems for NASA JPL’s Mars 2020 mission, as well as the recently launched xLink Space-Rated Modular Robotic Arm System that’s available for a wide range of commercial, government and education-focused missions.

    Chris is a frequent speaker at space, and robotics conferences and events.

    • 47 min
    Episode123: Virtual Meetup - Why Venture Fund Size Matters

    Episode123: Virtual Meetup - Why Venture Fund Size Matters

    Why is the size of the venture fund important to the entrepreneur? The size of the fund and the associated strategy for its portfolio construction should matter to the entrepreneur and the reasons why should be clear if you look at the math. Larger funds seek outsized returns, and therefore, this requires entrepreneurs to seek valuations over $1B in some cases. Depending on the founder’s ownership percentage, this sometimes can be less desirable than smaller exits, which can be encouraged by micro VC funds.

    In this presentation – we are going to dive into the math behind venture funds, how this translates to the entrepreneur, and how entrepreneurs should factor a fund’s size and portfolio strategy into their fundraising decisions.

    Jawhara Tariq is passionate about funding the LA tech ecosystem. She is going to dive into the math behind venture funds, how this translates to an entrepreneur, and how entrepreneurs should factor a fund’s size and portfolio strategy into their fundraising decisions.

    Bio:
    Jawhara Tariq has a background in LP investing, operations, and statistical analysis. Prior to joining Moonshots Capital, she created the investment mandate for a family office, helped to scale a venture development firm, and consulted with a fund of funds investing in underrepresented fund managers.

    Jawhara also worked as an associate at a venture fund in San Francisco where she made primary and secondary investments in late-stage enterprise software companies. Before working in venture capital, Jawhara worked in nonprofit consulting where she advised private foundations on how to increase impact. As a UCLA graduate and LA-native, Jawhara is passionate about building the LA tech ecosystem.

    Twitter: @JawharaTariq

    • 37 min
    Episode 121: Virtual Meetup - The Future of Living in Space

    Episode 121: Virtual Meetup - The Future of Living in Space

    The time when space exploration was only a matter of government has ended. In the past few years, a number of private space companies have skyrocketed. Elon Musk claims that the first manned crew to Mars will happen in 2024 whereas NASA plans to send humans to the same destination in the middle of the 2030s.

    There is a lot of interest expressed on how we will get there, yet no particular plans on HOW we will sustain our presence in the severe environment. Yet, NASA estimated that the crew behavioral health is a secondary risk in manned space missions after radiation exposure. Human factor considerations increase with the longevity of missions, in particular, their application to where future travelers will be living to support the wellbeing of the crew in an enclosed environment.

    What does the future of living in space look like? Is it going to look like the promise of sci-fi movies? Or somewhat different?

    Join Anastasia Prosina for a peek at what aspects need to be habitable modules to thrive in long-duration missions to Mars and why you should care.

    Visit Stellar Amenities to learn more about the future of living in space: https://stellaramenities.space/

    Bio:
    Anastasia Prosina is an award-winning aspirational futurist and practitioner in Space Architecture, the nascent field of helping people thrive in small spaces in space. She is the Founder & CEO at Stellar Amenities, a company with the mission of complementing space habitats with lightweight, deployable & reconfigurable elements to support wellbeing in space.

    Anastasia has been involved in numerous space projects, from designing lightweight interior habitation structures for the TESSERAE self-assembling space station at MIT Media Lab's Space Exploration Initiative to working on an Iceland-based Martian Analog Habitat commissioned by Mars Society. Her other places of work include aerospace company Excalibur Almaz, 4th Planet Logistics, and Galaktika Space.

    Anastasia holds a Masters in Space Architecture from Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture in proximity and collaboration of NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston. Anastasia received a Bachelor's in Urban Design from Novosibirsk State University of Architecture, Design, and Art. Lived her entire life in Siberia, Russia, she is now paving her way in the Los Angeles space sector.

    Twitter handle @glazizglago

    spacearchitecture

    • 44 min
    Episode 120: Sustainability: Can Blockchain Ensure Companies Do the Right Thing?

    Episode 120: Sustainability: Can Blockchain Ensure Companies Do the Right Thing?

    While the world is consumed with the current crisis, consumers are still selecting brands into their homes. What brands clear the test and why? A growing buyer value lies the answer to: “is this product produced in a sustainable and ethical fashion?” Sustainable operations are moving from marketing and public relations positioning to being embedded in the product experience.

    Join this discussion on how new technologies are providing transparency and assurance to consumers regarding fair labor, lower use of natural resources, eco-friendly packaging, and positive carbon footprints.

    Today’s companies are looking beyond showing what they do with the products in a sustainable and ethical manner to looking downstream and upstream from the materials to the transportation and disposition of their products. This shift needs a new way to share trusted, auditable information that is openly shared and free from manipulation. Companies are now adopting blockchain as the assured way to share the information.

    The discussion will share use cases on how the technology is being used and where it is headed in helping provide the keys to a better planet.

    If you are looking for or some advance materials, please feel free to read
    Blockchain for Dummies
    https://www.ibm.com/account/reg/us-en/signup?formid=urx-16905

    or view current use cases in action
    https://www.ibm.com/blockchain/use-cases/

    Bio:
    Kurt Wedgwood leads IBM’s Blockchain North America practice for the Retail, Consumer Product and Travel industries. To complement his focus and to give back, he is an Adjunct to the Albers School at Seattle University and former chair of Seattle University’s Innovation and Entrepreneurship Board. His “blockchain moment” occurred in 2016 during a 5-month sabbatical when he was asked to write an analytics article regarding Ports. In this moment, he realized the impact blockchain will have on the world and has dedicated his career to applying blockchain capabilities.

    Kurt lives in Seattle, WA is a graduate from the University of Colorado and received his MBA from the University of Chicago. Publications include Blockchain topics and Data Governance topics.

    LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/wedgwood/
    wedgwood@us.ibm.com.

    • 48 min
    Episode 119: VIRTUAL MEETUP: Growth in a Downturn

    Episode 119: VIRTUAL MEETUP: Growth in a Downturn

    Market ups and downs happen all the time. Some are industry-specific and some (like what we're seeing now) are general. What can you do as a founder to be resilient during a downturn and use the time as a period of growth?

    Bio:
    Paul Orlando has led startup accelerators on three continents. He is Adjunct Professor of Entrepreneurship at the University of Southern California and runs USC’s on-campus Incubator for businesses founded by students, alumni and faculty. Paul advises Fortune 500 and funded startups on internal product innovation, rapid experimentation and growth. He has degrees from Cornell and Columbia and was a winner at the TechCrunch Disrupt Hackathon. He studies unintended consequences.

    Twitter: @porlando

    • 48 min
    Episode 119: Regulatory & Investment Intersections for Healthcare Startups

    Episode 119: Regulatory & Investment Intersections for Healthcare Startups

    Kwame Ulmer’s talk will discuss what role regulations play in a healthcare startup’s life. He will provide a deep dive into regulatory strategy with an overview of 5 categories that healthcare startups should consider to be prepared for the road ahead.

    Bio: Kwame Ulmer
    Kwame Ulmer brings nearly twenty years of experience evaluating medical technologies in the government and serving in senior operating roles at medical device companies. This experience allows him to help companies at all stages efficiently navigate global regulatory agencies. Kwame has particular expertise in all aspects of the USFDA, from premarket applications to postmarket compliance.

    Mr. Ulmer previously served as Vice President, Regulatory Affairs and Quality Assurance at Implant Direct, a Danaher Corporation (Fortune 150) operating company. He led efforts to shorten global registration timelines, improved product quality by process optimization and achieve best-in-class department engagement scores. Kwame has in depth knowledge of the cross-functional activities needed to take a medical device from concept to product launch in markets including North America, EU, EMEA, China and LATAM.

    Kwame has served in progressive leadership roles at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and personally evaluated over 1,000 medical technologies. He has successfully overseen products through all FDA application types (IDE, 510(k), PMA, 513(g)) and advised over 100 early-stage medtech companies on regulatory path.

    Mr. Ulmer is a member of Tech Coast Angels (LA), the world’s largest angel investing network and a Venture Partner at Wavemaker Three-Sixty Health - the leading Southern-California based, early stage venture capital firm (Seed and Series A) focused on the healthcare industry. Kwame earned his B.S. in Physics from Lincoln University (Pennsylvania) and both an M.S. in Materials Engineering and M.B.A. from the University of Virginia.

    Twitter handle @kwameulmer

    • 47 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
6 Ratings

6 Ratings

Minnie_Ing ,

I <3 pasadena tech

These are great in person too. Swing by on Fridays to hear the speakers live. Thanks to Mike and Echo Factory for pulling these together!

blissme8 ,

Great information

These podcasts share remarkable insights and experience from those who are doing in the entrepreneurial space. I'd prefer to be there to meet and greet - but this inspiration and sometimes commiseration will do just fine!

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