300 episodes

Insight, wit and analysis as BBC correspondents, journalists and writers take a closer look at the stories behind the headlines. Presented by Kate Adie and Pascale Harter.

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast BBC

    • News
    • 4.7, 245 Ratings

Insight, wit and analysis as BBC correspondents, journalists and writers take a closer look at the stories behind the headlines. Presented by Kate Adie and Pascale Harter.

    New protests in Hong Kong

    New protests in Hong Kong

    The streets of Hong Kong have erupted into protests after mainland China proposed new security legislation, to outlaw the undermining of Beijing's authority in the territory. This comes after last year's demonstrations and pro-democracy movement in Hong Kong. Danny Vincent reports.
    The Lake Turkana area in Kenya's Rift valley is considered the cradle of mankind. On the surface, life in this semi-arid remote land appears to have changed little in centuries. But now with locusts swarms and fears about Covid-19, suddenly everything has changed, as Horatio Clare has been finding.
    In Papua New Guinea's central highlands region, two tribal communities have been fighting each other over ownership of a large coffee plantation. Violence has flared up, and some have committed atrocities. There is only one policeman for the whole region. And now he has handed in his notice, as Charlie Walker reports.
    We have all been told to wash our hands to avoid infection with the coronavirus. But as Bethany Bell reports, when hand-washing was first introduced in a hospital setting by Dr Semmelweis, an obstetrician in Vienna, in the nineteenth century, it was controversial and seen as downright subversive.
    Moscow has been living under lockdown like many other places. One of the shops Steve Rosenberg has been missing the most, is his old newspaper kiosk. Imagine his delight when he suddenly found it had reopened. And after weeks of isolation, it wasn't the newspapers that he was most pleased to see again.

    Presenter: Kate Adie
    Producer: Arlene Gregorius

    • 28 min
    Israel's Prime Minister in the dock

    Israel's Prime Minister in the dock

    In Israel, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu had his day in court at the start of his corruption trial this week. He denies charges of bribery, fraud and breach of trust. The trial could last months or even years. Israelis are wondering what it means for their future, as Tom Bateman reports from Jerusalem.

    In Zimbabwe, and in many other African countries, the numbers of confirmed Covid-19 cases are still low, not least due to swift lockdowns. But the coronavirus is not the worst threat the population faces, says Charlotte Ashton in Harare. Apart from TB, malaria and HIV, there's now hunger because the lockdown makes it hard to earn a living.

    Sweden did not opt for a lockdown, deciding instead to trust residents to make their own judgements about social distancing. Shops, pubs and restaurants have been allowed to remain open, but as Maddy Savage is finding, it's quite a minefield to negotiate all the dilemmas that throws up.

    Capoeira, a martial art with elements of dance and acrobatics, originated among enslaved Africans in Brazil. Now it has travelled eleven time zones east to Siberia's lake Baikal region in Russia. It means a lot more than exercise to the young locals there, as Olga Smirnova has been finding out. But how have they done under lockdown?

    Malta is home to the second oldest stone buildings in the world, 5000-year old temples. The people who built them are something of a mystery but new research on elongated skulls from that time may be about to lay to rest some of the wilder theories about their origins – or are they, asks Juliet Rix.

    Presenter: Kate Adie
    Producer: Arlene Gregorius

    • 28 min
    From Our Home Correspondent 26/05/2020

    From Our Home Correspondent 26/05/2020

    In the latest programme, Mishal Husain introduces dispatches from journalists and writers reflecting the range of life across the UK.

    She begins and ends in Edinburgh. First, the BBC's Social Affairs Correspondent, Michael Buchanan, reveals how a renowned city centre doctor is using one public health emergency - Covid-19 - to tackle another - drug-related deaths among the homeless. Could a notoriously difficult medical and social problem prove amenable to new approaches?

    Cabin fever is a literal risk for those living aboard narrow boats at the moment. And while self-sufficiency is a characteristic of those who live afloat, as Lois Pryce has been discovering among users on the Grand Union Canal, their ingenuity is being tested by the relatively prosaic requirements for water and fuel.

    It's once again possible for those in England who are looking to move house to visit potential new homes in person. What, though, of those who are already part of a chain with buyers and sellers ready to go ahead? Lesley Curwen, a business reporter for more than three decades, finds herself in just that situation. Will she make her dream move to the West Country or will there be a last-minute hitch?

    Foster carers become accustomed to all types of placements. Emily Unia's parents have decades of experience but even so it's been special for them to share the last several weeks with a young boy and his baby sister who arrived just days before lockdown. She reveals how they've all been coping.

    And, back in the Scottish capital, Christopher Harding provides an amusing insight into the world of home schooling as his three children adjust to their new teachers and lessons. How do the ambitions of the new staff fare amid the realities of the schoolroom?

    Producer: Simon Coates

    • 28 min
    Covid-19 surges in Brazil

    Covid-19 surges in Brazil

    The number of confirmed cases of Covid-19 has surged in Brazil. And yet there are many Brazilians who fail to observe social distancing or to wear masks. Some people blame President Jair Bolsonaro's handling of the crisis. He has criticised state governors for imposing quarantines. And as Katy Watson reports from Sao Paulo, the pandemic is turning into a political issue as much as a health one.
    It's been Ramadan in the Muslim world, and this year mosques around the world have been shut under lockdown. Not so in Pakistan, where, as Secunder Kermani has found, the politicians chose not to oppose the clerics who wanted to keep them open for prayer. Policemen stood by powerlessly as the faithful flocked in.
    Fancy returning to the theatre or ballet? You're not alone. Performers too, have been longing to get back to the stage. That's not possible yet, but in Germany they can now rehearse in studios again rather than their kitchens. Jenny Hill went to watch the Dortmund ballet dust off their tutus and stretch their muscly limbs again.
    In Lebanon and Syria, it's the season when the jasmine blossoms. The sweet smell is even more powerful this year, as it doesn't need to compete with traffic pollution as much, thanks to lockdown. The jasmine's scent also evokes memories of the past, for some, says Lizzie Porter in Beirut.
    In Belgium, lockdown has been eased. Many shops have reopened, as have schools, at least in part. Even hairdressers are welcoming customers again. Our correspondent Kevin Connolly has made a tentative return to consumerism - you won't believe what his first purchase was.
    Presenter: Kate Adie
    Producer: Arlene Gregorius

    • 27 min
    Covid-19 reaches the White House

    Covid-19 reaches the White House

    For weeks President Donald Trump downplayed the threat of the coronavirus. The White House carried on with business as usual. But then a few members of staff tested positive for the virus. Anthony Zurcher reports on the impact this has had on both the White House, and on the Trump administration more widely.
    In Ukraine, it's a year since the new president, Volodymyr Zelensky, came to office. Before he was elected Mr Zelensky had been a comedian and actor, playing a popular fictional president fighting corruption in a TV series. And then he got the job for real. Jonah Fisher reports on how the actor-turned-politician has been getting on.
    The Dutch have been having “an intelligent lockdown” - to minimise the impact on society and the economy. Only shops such as hairdressers or beauticians had to close. As the lockdown eases Anna Holligan reports on innovative solutions to enable restaurants to open and care home residents to see their families again.
    In Chile's capital Santiago a very strict lockdown was only imposed a few days ago. This new stress comes after months of social unrest over inequalities in the country. Protestors were promised they could vote for a new constitution, but that’s now been put on hold, as Jane Chambers reports.
    In Greece, they're celebrating Easter - on the 26th of May. It will be a scaled down version, after the actual Easter in April had to be cancelled, with churches closed for lockdown. Heidi Fuller-Love finds that religion is so important, it's sewn into the seam of life in Crete, and not just a coat to throw on when it's cold.
    Presenter: Kate Adie
    Producer: Arlene Gregorius

    • 28 min
    France emerges from lockdown

    France emerges from lockdown

    France had one of the toughest lockdowns but now people can go shopping again in outlets that had been shut for the last two months. Lucy Williamson joins customers in Paris as they queue outside, to ask them how they have been faring.
    Sudan can't spend much money on healthcare. But as Mark Weston reports, the young activists from the revolutionary committees that helped to oust President Omar al-Bashir last year, are battling against the coronavirus, armed with hand sanitiser and food for the vulnerable.
    The Roma are a minority that has often been blamed for social ills wherever they live, and now they're being scapegoated for the arrival of Covid-19 in some parts of Spain, as Guy Hedgecoe has found.
    In Bangladesh, garment workers had been enjoying better conditions since the Rana Plaza factory collapsed seven years ago. But now there's a new worry about the coronavirus, and how to get good healthcare. Christine Stewart meets doctors and patients at a charitable hospital where even the poorest patients get top class care, and not just for Covid-19.
    And if you thought that having a cup of tea could provide respite from the news about the pandemic, spare a thought for Steve Evans in Australia, who finds that the knock-on effects of the virus on supply chains means he can no longer get the right tea bags.
    Presenter: Kate Adie
    Producer: Arlene Gregorius

    • 27 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
245 Ratings

245 Ratings

California Admires Ruiz Tizon ,

Very thoughtful essay by Harry Shearer.

Thanks indeed.

wolfie/wolf ,

The New White Mans Burden

Oh I thought colonialism was over. But no it’s the new white mans burden to impose the Gay agenda on those poor savages The left wing hypocrites

ccr226 ,

Such a great podcast

Always interesting, well delivered, and wonderful to hear stories that go beyond the headlines and take us to places we do not hear enough about elsewhere on the news. One of my standard weekend podcasts!

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