243 episodes

Gangland Wire Crime Stories is a unique true crime podcast. The host, Gary Jenkins, is a former Kansas City Police Intelligence Unit Detective. Gary uses his experience to give insigtful twists on famous organized characters across the United States. He tells crime stories from his own career and invites former FBI agents, police officers and criminals to educate and entertain listeners.

Gangland Wire Gary Jenkins: Mafia Detective

    • True Crime
    • 4.6 • 311 Ratings

Gangland Wire Crime Stories is a unique true crime podcast. The host, Gary Jenkins, is a former Kansas City Police Intelligence Unit Detective. Gary uses his experience to give insigtful twists on famous organized characters across the United States. He tells crime stories from his own career and invites former FBI agents, police officers and criminals to educate and entertain listeners.

    Jeffrey Sussman on Greg Scarpa

    Jeffrey Sussman on Greg Scarpa

    Jeffrey Sussman

    Gary interviews Jeffrey Sussman who is the author of 15 non-fiction books. Mr. Sussman’s most recent book, Big Apple Gangsters: The Rise and Decline of the Mob in New York, is the subject. He has also written extensively about professional boxing as well as the subject of Marketing. with books like Boxing and the Mob: The Notorious History of the Sweet Science; Rocky Graziano: Fists, Fame, and Fortune; Max Baer and Barney Ross: Jewish Heroes of Boxing, and Power Promoting: How to Market Your Business to The Top!

    Greg Scarpa

    In this interview, Gary and Jeffrey discuss his chapter on Greg Scarpa or the “Grim Reaper.” Scarpa started as a young mobster in the Profaci crime family. Later he will graduate to be a Capo and hitman for the the Colombo crime family. He will fuel his success as a gangster by making a deal with the FBI. During his entire mob career Greg Scarpa acted as an informant in exchange for Burau turning a blind eye to his crimes.

    The Grim Reaper and the KKK

    During the summer of 1964, KKK members murdered three Civil Rights workers as they drove through the small town of Philadelphia Mississippi. The FBI sent many agents to solve this crime as seen in the film, Mississippi Burning with Gene Hackman. In that movie, hackman depicted a rouge FBI agent who threatened sexual torture to solve this crime and locate the victim’s bodies. In reality, Jeffrey tells us the FBI brought their prize informant down, gave him a gun, and pointed out the most likely suspects. Scarpa kidnapped an appliance store owner by buying television and taking him prisoner as he delivered the TV. Greg Scarpa beat the man to a bloody pulp and when he still refused to divulge the perpetrators and location of the bodies, Scarpa threatened castration. The man quickly confessed. A grateful FBI paid Scarpa $100,000 as a reward. They pointed him at another unsolved murder and when they refused to pay him another $100,000, he returned to New york.

    Greg Scarpa Loses an Eye

    On December 29, 1992, Greg Scarpa was on house arrest and wearing an electronic monitoring device. Lucchese family mobsters, Michael DeRosa and Ronald Moran, were doing a drug deal with Scarpa’s son, Joey Scarpa. They tried to cheat him over the money and threatened to kill him. Joey Scarpa told his Dad about this intimidation and the father and son hit the streets looking for retribution. Even though he was being monitored by his ankle monitor, the father and son drove to DeRosa’s house. During a short gun battle, they shot DeRosa. Ronald Moran was there and he fired back. Scarpa was wounded in his eye. Scarpa and his son drive back home where he poured whisky into his wound. The phone was bringing and he told the caller from the monitoring company that he had just stepped out to the pharmacy to get some medicine. Prosecutors learned about the ambush and revoked Scarpa’s house arrest.

    The Mobster gets AIDS

    Prison and death

    During the time of the above gunfight, Greg Scarpa was suffering from HIV and was into full-blown AIDS. He had received his infection from a blood transfusion. In a lawsuit against his doctor, the court learned about another complaint filed against this defendant doctor for allegedly sedating two different male patients. While they were under sedation, the doctor supposedly sodomized the patients. Mr. Sussman tells us the judge, in this case, remarked, “let’s see here we have a mafia hitman plaintiff and a defendant medical doctor who is accused of sedating and sodomizing patient.”  Scarpa settled for $300,000 in cash payments to his family. On December 15, 1993, a federal judge sentenced Greg Scarpa. On June 4,

    • 43 min
    Chris Paciello – South Beach Celebrity

    Chris Paciello – South Beach Celebrity

    Chris Paciello – The early days

    Chris Paciello was born Christian Ludwigsen in the Borough Park section of Brooklyn to an Italian mother and non-Italian father who was an addict and a petty thief. Chris’s father was a street guy who rarely took care of his family. His mother moved Chris to an Italian neighborhood in Brooklyn and they began using her maiden name, Paciello. Chris started as a petty thief, boosting car stereos at age 15, and graduated to stealing cars. He became close with the New Springfield Boys, a young crew often used by both the Colombo and Bonanno families for small jobs, arson, robbery, intimidation.  Like most young men of the 1980s-90s, they dabbled in street-level drug dealing. Paciello maintained his mafia connections for use later in his criminal career.

    Chris Paciello – First big score

    Paciello got his first big break in the early 90s when he noticed some young guys loading bales of marijuana into a panel truck. Chris was always quick to see an opportunity and he followed the panel truck until the men dropped it on the street and left it unguarded. Chris knew how to hotwire an automobile so he called in his crew and they took the marijuana. Since Paciello was in a group with mafia connections, a Bonanno Capo named Anthony Graziano demanded a piece of this theft. Graziano demanded $50,000 in cash. Paciello gladly paid this tribute because they actually made over three times that amount.

    Chris Paciello – Armed Robbery

    Chris Paciello and the New Springfield Boys decide to go for the big money and robbed six banks over the next few months after the marijuana caper. Modeling themselves after the Point Break robbery crew, they meticulously planned each robbery. They cased the locations, used crash cars, knew the schedules of the armored car arrivals and the personal schedules of every bank employee. Paciello was building for the future with each bank robbery and one even netted them over $300,000.

    Chris Paciello – A job goes wrong

    Paciello was always on the prowl for a bigger job and more money. He was a thinking robber and looked into the porn industry because they usually dealt in cash. He learned about a porn magnate named Sami Shemtov who owned many porn shops in New York City.   Even while many of these porn stores were co-owned by mob members, Paciello started running surveillance on Shemtov. he learned where he lived and believed he must keep a cash hoard inside his home  Chris recruited outside his normal crew and convinced mob associates and members of a Bonanno crew called the Bath Avenue crew to help him. Bonnano associates Jimmy Calendra and Tommy Reynolds went to Shemtov’s home. Reynolds was a crack addit and unreliable to the poin that he spent the whole day smoking in preparation for the home invasion. Paciello and his crew arrived at Shemtov’s. Calendra and Reynolds went to the door, while Paciello waited in the car. Shemtov’s wife answered the door. Reynolds was jittery and afraid and for some reason he pulled his trigger killing Ms. Chemtov in front of her 9-year old daughter. The two men fled back to Pacielloo and the getaway car with no money. Newspapers later reported that Shemtov diod not have a safe and did to keep his store rfeceiuopts at home.

    Chris Paciello – Still out there

    Paciello left New York after this crime and invested much of his money into a Miami South Beach club called Risk. During this time, he hedged his bets and started proving the FBI information.  He was very successful in the Miami club scene and sooner partnered with a local celebrity named Ingrid Casares and opened Club Liquid. He became friends with many movie stars and music legends like Madonna during these days. On December 1, 1999, New York charged Paciello in the 1993 murder of Judith Shemtov.  Sofia Vergara and other wealthy customers of his South Beach club posted his t

    • 46 min
    Ron Fino – Mr. Undercover

    Ron Fino – Mr. Undercover

    Ron Fino- Undercover Contractor

    This is the audio from a Zoom call in which the Gangland Wire Supporters and I talk with Mr. Undercover, Ron Fino. Ron started as a Union business manager in the Buffalo New York area. His father was a member of the Buffalo Family under Stephano Maggadino. He saw how the mob abused their power and harmed union employees. Ron has always looked out for the folks with less power over their circumstances.

    Mr. Fino contacted the FBI and volunteered his services. They had him sign a contract to work for them as a paid undercover agent. Throughout his career, Ron passed along information on the Buffalo family, the Chicago Outfit, the Cleveland mob, New York City mobsters, the Russian mob, and he even passed along information from the west coast crime families.

    Later in his life, the FBI and CIA coordinated and sent him into Middle Eastern terrorist organizations to uncover arms deals.

    Ron Fino and his exploits are documented in his book, Mr. Undercover.

    Show Notes by Gary Jenkins

     Support the Podcast

    Hit me up on Venmo for a cup of coffee or a shot and a beer @ganglandwire

    To go to the store or make a donation Click Here.









     

    To rent Brothers against Brothers, the documentary, click here. 

    To rent Gangland Wire, the documentary, click here

    To subscribe on iTunes click here, please give me a review and help others find the podcast

    • 1 hr 14 min
    Joe Pistone and Deep Cover

    Joe Pistone and Deep Cover

    Joe Pistone Podcast

    In this episode, Gary interviews the famous retired FBI Agent Joe Pistone aka Donnie Brasko, and his podcasting partner Leo Rossi. Joe Pistone has started his own true-crime podcast based on stories from his 6-year undercover assignment. Agent Joe Pistone infiltrated the Bonanno Crime Family. He tells about working with Lefty Ruggerio and other stories. This podcast is titled Deep Cover and you can find it on all podcast apps. Click here to find their website

    Leaving Vegas: The True Story of How FBI Wiretaps Ended Mob Domination of Las Vegas Casinos

    This week on December 16th, Amazon will allow free downloads of my book, Leaving Vegas. This is the second of a limited duration Christmas present for listeners and their friends. Be sure and tell everybody and share on your social media outlets.

    Show Notes by Gary Jenkins

     Support the Podcast

    Hit me up on Venmo for a cup of coffee or a shot and a beer @ganglandwire

    To go to the store or make a donation Click Here.









     

    To rent Brothers against Brothers, the documentary, click here. 

    To rent Gangland Wire, the documentary, click here

    To subscribe on iTunes click here, please give me a review and help others find the podcast

    • 29 min
    Jack Garcia aka Jack Falcone

    Jack Garcia aka Jack Falcone

    Jack Garcia – the early days

    Joaquin “Jack” Garcia was actually born in pre-Castro Cuba. His family immigrated to the U.S. in the early days of Castro because his father was going to be arrested by the new regime. As a child, Jack was often the target of bullies because he did not speak English. His size and demeanor quickly put an end to the bullying. He grew into a 6′ 4″ 250-pound college football player. he became interested in law enforcement and tried several times to join the FBI. Finally, he saw an advertisement that the FBI was looking for native Spanish speakers and applied to that program. When he was finally accepted after many attempts, he learned the Bureau had rejected him before because they learned the CIA had a file on him and his family.

    Jack Garcia – first undercover assignment

    The FBI, after rejecting him for being Cuban born, took advantage of his natural Cuban accented Spanish. Jack chose the undercover name, Jack Falcone. TheFBI assigned him to work on Omega 7, an anti-Castro Cuban terrorist group. They also had him infiltrate all the various Cuban groups in Miami, the FALN – Puerto Rican terrorist organization, and investigate Cuban spy cells sent by Castro. He found himself the target of a death threat and the Bureau sent him back to the New Jersey and New York City area.

     Jack Garcia – the Mafia

    After several years working different Hispanic narcotics gangs where he acted as a money launderer and took down a group of dirty cops in Florida, the FBI decided they might send him into a mafia group. he was able to befriend a Gambino capo, named Greg DePalma. DePalma loved to use Garcia’s size to intimidate other mobsters and associates.

    Leaving Vegas: The True Story of How FBI Wiretaps Ended Mob Domination of Las Vegas Casinos

    This week on December 19th and 11th, Amazon will allow free downloads of my book, Leaving Vegas. This is a two-day only Chrs=istmas present for listeners and their friends. Be sure and tell everybody and share on your social media outlets.



    Show Notes by Gary Jenkins

     Support the Podcast

    Hit me up on Venmo for a cup of coffee or a shot and a beer @ganglandwire

    To go to the store or make a donation Click Here.









     

    To rent Brothers against Brothers, the documentary, click here. 

    To rent Gangland Wire, the documentary, click here

    To subscribe on iTunes click here, please give me a review and help others find the podcast

    • 1 hr 10 min
    Frankie Carbo

    Frankie Carbo

    Frankie Carbo- the early years

    Paul John Carbo (born Paolo Giovanni Carbo; AKA Frankie Carbo was a New York City Mafia soldier in the Lucchese crime family. He was a gunman and assassin for “Lepke” Louis Buchalter in the Murder Inc. organization. Authorities arrested Carbo seventeen times for murder.  He will gravitate to California and continue his murderous habits. In 1939, he was a suspect in the murder of informant Harry “Big Greenie” Greenberg in California. “Kid Twist” Abe Reles agreed to testify against Franky Carbo in this case. In one of the most famous suspicious deaths in mob history, Kid Twist Reles will either be pushed out a window or otherwise sustain a fatal fall from an 8th story window while under police protection. The prosecutor dismissed the case against Carbo. Informants at the time claimed Carbo was responsible for murdering Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel in Beverly Hills, California in 1947.

    Boxing Promoter

    During World War II, Carbo started promoting boxing matches in California. He joined with a group of other boxing promoters known as the Combination. They will become successful and promote many high-profile matches and fix those same matches for Mob gambling interests. Frankie Carbo had become the mob’s unofficial commissioner for boxing and controlled many fighters. They did not put in the fix on every fight. One of the more famous fixes was Kid Galivan and Johnny Saxon. Carbo Lieutenant, Blinky Palermo from Philadelphia, controlled Saxon. After a fifteen-round fight, the referees awarded the match to Saxton. Most boxing fans believed Kid Galivan won that match.

    Franky Carbo and Sonny Liston

    By 1959, Franky Carbo and his partner Blinky Palermo owned a piece of heavyweight boxer Sonny Liston. He would win the World Heavyweight Championship in 1962. From the start of his pro career in 1953, St. Louis crime family mobster John Vitale had been an owner of Liston’s first contract and he sold a piece of Liston to Carbo and Blinky Palermo. At the time, Carbo was imprisoned after the government convicted him of the undercover management of prize-fighters and unlicensed matchmaking. At the time law enforcement and the entire sports world knew that Vitale and other mobsters-controlled Liston’s contract. Liston fought 12 fights under the control of Vitale, Carbo, and Palermo.

    Franky Carbo and Legal troubles

    After serving a sentence for racketeering in 1960, a Senate investigation committee on mob influence on boxing subpoenaed Carbo and others to a hearing. Franky Carbo took the Fifth Amendment 25 times, answering “I cannot be compelled to be a witness against myself.” In 1961, after that hearing, the FBI made a case of conspiracy and extortion on Carbo and Palmero. This was for threats made to the National Boxing Association Welterweight Champion Don Jordan. Attorney General Robert Kennedy served as a prosecutor and the court sentenced Carbo to 25 years in Alcatraz Island Penitentiary. Granted early parole due to ill health, Carbo was released from prison. He died in Miami Beach, Florida on November 22, 1976.

    Show Notes by Gary Jenkins

     Support the Podcast

    Hit me up on Venmo for a cup of coffee or a shot and a beer @ganglandwire

    To go to the store or make a donation Click Here.









     

    To rent Brothers against Brothers, the documentary, click here. 

    To rent Gangland Wire, the documentary, click here

    To subscribe on iTunes a href="https://itunes.apple.

    • 37 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
311 Ratings

311 Ratings

PW from GR ,

The Real Deal

Coming from Atlantic City from 1974-2004, working in the casino industry, and once living right in the middle of Nicky Scarfo’s Ducktown neighborhood, I am a true Mafia-phile. Gary is the real deal and I am so grateful that he is sharing all his wonderful knowledge and stories. After decades of hearing these stories through East Ciast accents, I get a huge kick out of this guy with the Midwestern twang.

Blue Laura Marie ,

So very interesting!

I am a podcast- true crime addict and LOVED listening. Great host. Interesting guests and wonderful stories. I did feel like I was sitting in a coffee shop listening to interesting tales from a group of good friends. All are so knowledgeable about the history woven with rich detail and insight. I enjoyed learning. Thank you for sharing this so others might enjoy!

Non Garage Person ,

Great podcast!

Love the podcast. Covers mafia history in great detail and a lot of other interests that you can’t find much podcast coverage on. I found this podcast on accident and now it’s my daily listen. Thanks Gary and crew. Keep up the Great work.

Ethan

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