22 episodes

Podcast by From the editors and tastemakers at Garden & Gun magazine.

Garden & Gun's Whole Hog From the editors and tastemakers at Garden & Gun magazine.

    • Society & Culture

Podcast by From the editors and tastemakers at Garden & Gun magazine.

    Season 3, Ep. 8: Home is Where the Art Is

    Season 3, Ep. 8: Home is Where the Art Is

    Darla Moore knows what it’s like to be underestimated, and so does her hometown. The successful businesswoman and philanthropist always had to prove herself—to make Wall Street bigwigs look past her good looks and Southern accent. But she persevered, making her name (and a couple of billion dollars) in finance and investing, a success that landed her on the cover of Fortune magazine, the first woman to do so, and eventually on the greens at Augusta National, where she became one of the first women to be invited to join the club that hosts the annual Masters golf tournament. While she was away, first in Washington, D.C., and then, in New York City, her hometown of Lake City, South Carolina, a once-vibrant farming community, had come on hard times. But Moore never forgot where she came from, and returned to live part-time in the place her family had called home for generations with a business plan to revitalize her beloved community. Today, due to many of Moore's initiatives, Lake City boasts ArtFields, a top-notch art competition and festival; a thriving downtown; and year-round tourism, thanks in part to the Moore Farms Botanical Garden, a sixty-five-acre research garden on Moore’s grandparents’ land. In this episode, we hear about the transformation from Darla Moore at her Lake City home, Mayor Lovith Anderson in Lake City’s Bean Market, and Holly Shady, a director of ArtFields.

    • 41 min
    Season 3 Ep 7: Robert Earl Keen, The Road Goes on Forever

    Season 3 Ep 7: Robert Earl Keen, The Road Goes on Forever

    Robert Earl Keen has been writing songs since the late 1970s, when he was an English major at Texas A&M University and has been performing them live for almost as long. We recently caught up with Keen to talk about his life, his songs, his upcoming tour with college buddy and fellow Texan Lyle Lovett, and training his new dog, Cormac.

    • 45 min
    Season 3 Ep 6: Brevard, Bluegrass, and Brown Trout

    Season 3 Ep 6: Brevard, Bluegrass, and Brown Trout

    Frontman for the Steep Canyon Rangers, Woody Platt, takes us back to the band's beginning, discusses the magic of Steve Martin, and why he still calls Brevard, North Carolina, home.

    In eighteen years, the Steep Canyon Rangers have gone from playing underground bars in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, to selling out Carnegie Hall. Guitarist, singer, and frontman Woody Platt, who founded the bluegrass band along with college friend and Rangers banjo player Graham Sharp, sits down with us to discuss the band's evolution and an unexpected partnership with comedian (and banjonist) Steve Martin.

    In this episode, Platt, an avid fly fisherman, also takes us back to his home in Brevard, North Carolina, and explains how the town's natural setting and musical traditions have impacted his life.

    • 39 min
    Season 3 Ep 5: Following the Smell of Bourbon

    Season 3 Ep 5: Following the Smell of Bourbon

    “Bourbon will make you do funny things,” says chef Edward Lee. Growing up in Brooklyn to Korean immigrant parents, Lee’s move to Louisville, Kentucky might surprise some. But sixteen years and several successful restaurants, cookbooks, and television shows later, Lee has made his mark on Southern food. He joins us on the podcast to discuss his new book Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef’s Journey to Discover America’s New Melting-Pot Cuisine, which guides us a on a tour around the country eating Lebanese kibbeh in Clarksdale, Mississippi, Vaca Frita in Miami, and slaw dogs in West Virginia.

    Also chef Lee remembers writer and television star Anthony Bourdain, tells us why he never orders shrimp, and recounts how he masterfully negotiated the purchase of an impressive vintage bourbon collection, including a bottle of Echo Springs from 1917.

    • 38 min
    Season 3 Ep 4: It All Started with a Bag of Turnip Greens

    Season 3 Ep 4: It All Started with a Bag of Turnip Greens

    Yes, the turnip greens at Taqueria del Sol are legendary (as are the tacos and margaritas), but there is more to this wildly popular Southern restaurant. We caught up with chef Eddie Hernandez and his business partner, Mike Klank, who together have been cooking up delicious Mexican food in Atlanta for more than three decades, to find out how this unlikely duo met, why they're so successful (hint: it's the food), and to dig into Eddie’s new cookbook, Turnip Greens & Tortillas. Plus, at the end of the episode, we switch gears and get a crash course in Southern style with Sid and Ann Mashburn on their three must-haves for every well-dressed man and woman.

    • 37 min
    Season 3 Ep3: Writing America’s History

    Season 3 Ep3: Writing America’s History

    Pulitzer-prize winning presidential biographer and Chattanooga native Jon Meacham has written books on the lives of Thomas Jefferson, George H. W. Bush, Andrew Jackson, and the relationship between Franklin Roosevelt and Winston Churchill. He joins us in this episode of the Whole Hog to discuss essential Southern reading, the historian’s responsibility, moving back to the South, and his new book, 'The Soul of America: The Battle for our Better Angels'.

    • 44 min

Customer Reviews

Ann from South Carolina ,

Darla Moore’s laugh

John and Darla have an old friends easy banter. I love how surprises her and makes her laugh. Great music especially on this podcast. It is one of the top two podcasts for me of the year. The other is WSJ’s Future of Everything on commercial fishing. Ms. Moore is an international treasure.

hodcast ,

More, please, and thank you!

My morning walks fly as I connect to the Southern voices of G&G’s acclaimed contributors - and there is no better moderator than John Huey! PLEASE post new 2018 episodes.

Secretly Southern ,

Most Episodes Intrigue, Some Miss the Mark

I’ve been a longtime subscriber of the magazine and jumped on the podcast bandwagon as soon as it was announced. The episodes seem at their best when showcasing music and food stories. Other episodes seem to struggle with structure and a narrative arc that is both compelling and satisfying. Of course, not every story is going to appeal to every listener; disappointing to me are when the episodes that I think I’m going to be the most interested in fall flat. Season 3’s Home is Where the Art is, for example, has a fascinating premise—how a small farm town is being revived/re-imagined—but only the last 10 minutes/two interviews have both substance and flow. There are *many* good episodes, which makes it all the more disappointing when different editing, or adding or removing a voice from the conversation, would have made all the difference.

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

Listeners Also Subscribed To