19 episodes

Join Certified Financial Planner, David Foster, as he interviews St. Louis area non-profit leaders from the perspective of a prospective donor and offers insights into how to make the greatest impact with your charitable donations.

Gateway Giving David Foster

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Join Certified Financial Planner, David Foster, as he interviews St. Louis area non-profit leaders from the perspective of a prospective donor and offers insights into how to make the greatest impact with your charitable donations.

    #19 - Gateway Pet Guardians - Emily Stuart

    #19 - Gateway Pet Guardians - Emily Stuart

    By: David M. Foster, CFP®, CAP®

    Hello, listeners, and welcome to the 19th episode of the Gateway Giving Podcast!
    My guest today is Emily Stuart, the Executive Director of Gateway Pet Guardians, whose mission is to champion a thriving pet welfare community in East St. Louis, Cahokia Heights, Washington Park and Fairmont City, which they have coined the East Side Pet District.

    I have been hesitant to have any animal focused nonprofits on the podcast thus far, because it can be hard to justify donating money to a charity that works with animals when there are so many humans who need our help. Even if you don’t believe that animal suffering deserves the same attention as human suffering, I think there are still two compelling reasons to consider donating to animal welfare causes:
    A great deal of animal suffering is the result of human action or inaction. If we caused the mess, we should take responsibility for cleaning it up.At least in the case of Gateway Pet Guardians, a donation to their organization is just as much about the people in the community as it is the animals.I think about my dog, Rosemary, and the joy she brings my family and me, and I know that’s true for so many other families. We’re fortunate enough that we have the resources to take her to see a veterinarian who’s only about a 4 minute drive from our house, but that isn’t always true for the people who live in the East Side Pet District. Until Gateway Pet Guardians opened their facility in East St. Louis in 2020, there wasn’t a single veterinary clinic in the area!
    If you love animals, like I do, you’ll enjoy this interview!
    As always, if you have any questions, requests, or suggestions for people or organizations for me to interview, you can email me at david@gatewaywealthstl.com. Now, without further ado, here is my interview with Emily!
    Links
    HomepageDonateVolunteerFosterAmazon Wish ListAdoptYouTube Channel2020 Impact Report2020 IRS Form 9902019 IRS Form 9902020 Audited Financial Statements

    • 45 min
    #18 - Flance Early Learning Center - Latrice Dinkins, Aurdeen Clarkson, & Tami Timmer

    #18 - Flance Early Learning Center - Latrice Dinkins, Aurdeen Clarkson, & Tami Timmer

    By: David M. Foster, CFP®, CAP®

    Hello, listeners, and welcome to the 18th episode of the Gateway Giving Podcast!
    My guests today are Aurdeen Clarkson, Tami Timmer, and Latrice Dinkins, all of whom work for Flance Early Learning Center, a diverse, intentional early childhood education center that nurtures children and adults in a trusting culture of love, Respect, Accountability, Compassion and Consistency.

    Early childhood education is an issue that is near and dear to my heart, as I have two kids currently in an early childhood education center, and I have another kid who’s not far removed from one. In contrast with K-12 education in our country, early childhood education is primarily funded by tuition paid by the families utilizing those services. As a result, instead of spreading the costs of early childhood education across our communities, the way we do with K-12, the families who are currently utilizing those services have to foot the entire bill, which is usually somewhere between $1,000 and $1,500 per kid per month. This means that if you’re not in the top income quintile, you’re likely going to have to make some tough choices.
    You might decide not to send your kid to an ECEC because the cost would be greater than the amount you would earn from your job. Of course, for a parent who chooses to stay home with their kids, re-entering the workforce can prove challenging, and most people who find themselves in that situation will never be able to get back on their pre-kid income trajectory. And, of course, this phenomenon impacts women, disproportionately. Alternatively, you might decide to send your kid to a home-based daycare, but, if you do that, the odds are high that your kid will be less safe, and they won’t be instructed by someone who has an educational background in early childhood development. Lastly, you might just decide to bite the bullet and pay for the entire cost of a high quality ECEC, which has the potential to put a strain on the rest of your finances.
    Taking into consideration the context of what I’ve just described, what the staff at Flance Early Learning Center is doing is remarkable. They’re providing as high a quality of early childhood education as you’ll find in a state of the art facility, and they’re doing it in the poorest zip code in Missouri. A zip code where the median annual household income is roughly equivalent to the cost of providing high quality early childhood education to one infant for one year. Obviously, most of the families they serve don’t have the income to pay full tuition, which means that they rely heavily on philanthropy, as well as government grants through the Head Start Program that is administered, in our area, by Youth In Need.
    As always, if you have any questions, requests, or suggestions for people or organizations for me to interview, you can email me at david@gatewaywealthstl.com. Now, without further ado, here is my interview with Latrice, Aurdeen, and Tami!

    Links
    HomepageDonateVolunteer2019 Annual Report2019 IRS Form 990HistoryFacebook

    • 58 min
    #17 - Home Sweet Home - Sean Ballard

    #17 - Home Sweet Home - Sean Ballard

    By: David M. Foster, CFP®, CAP®

    Hello, listeners, and welcome to the 17th episode of the Gateway Giving Podcast!
    My guest today is Sean Ballard, the operations director for Home Sweet Home, the only furniture bank in the St. Louis region.

    For my very first interview in episode 1 of this podcast, I interviewed Mary Kitley of the St. Louis Area Foodbank, and I learned that foodbanks are, essentially, just giant logistics operations. They figure out how to get food to people who either don’t have access to it, or don’t have the resources to afford it on their own.
    Well, a furniture bank follows the exact same concept, but the difference here is that there is only one of them in the St. Louis region, and, as evidenced by their rapid growth in just the 6 years since the organization as been in existence, there is an enormous unmet need.
    Obviously, all else being equal, having a roof over your head is better than not having a roof over your head, but it’s hard to make a house a home with just a roof and four walls. 90% of the families that Home Sweet Home serves have a household income of less than $18,000 per year. $18,000 per year! If your household income is $18,000 or less, quality furnishings, or any furnishings at all, just aren’t going to be in the budget, so Home Sweet Home has partnered with dozens of organizations from all over the region to connect their donors, people who have furniture they’re no longer using, with people who need it. And, to be clear, they’re not just giving their clients whatever they can find. They are extremely selective on what furniture they will accept, and they have their clients to come to their warehouse to hand pick the items themselves, giving them a sense of pride and dignity in the process.
    As always, if you have any questions, requests, or suggestions for people or organizations for me to interview, you can email me at david@gatewaywealthstl.com. Now, without further ado, here is my interview with Sean!

    Links
    Home Sweet HomeDonateVolunteer2020 Annual Report2020 IRS Form 990Partner AgenciesFacebookTwitterLinkedIn

    • 39 min
    #16 - Maxine Clark

    #16 - Maxine Clark

    By: David M. Foster, CFP®, CAP®

    Hello, listeners, and welcome to the 16th episode of the Gateway Giving Podcast!
    My guest today is Maxine Clark. You may or may not be familiar with her name, but, especially if you are from the St. Louis area, you are almost certainly familiar with her work. She is the founder of Build-A-Bear Workshop.
    Since she stepped down from her role as Chief Executive Bear in 2013, she has been spending her time using her wealth and influence to improve the lives of others in the St. Louis region, primarily through the foundation she and her husband, Bob Fox, founded in 2004. In particular, right now she is focused on putting the finishing touches on the Delmar Divine; a mixed-use development for social innovators that will provide office space and shared resources for nonprofits, as well as approximately 150 affordable apartments designed for young, diverse professionals.
    I wanted to have Maxine on the podcast, not only because I wanted to hear more about her work with the Delmar Divine, but also because I am fascinated by how people with significant wealth think about the opportunity and/or responsibility they have to use that wealth to give back to the community that helped create it in the first place. One of my missions in life is to convince people with excess wealth to give more of that wealth away to people who aren’t related to them, so I want to know how I can help to replicate Maxine’s attitude about philanthropy and the responsibility we all have to one another across our region and our country.
    As you’ll hear in this interview, it's impossible to interact with Maxine and not come away from it feeling more optimistic about the future of St. Louis. This was a delightful conversation, and I hope you enjoy it as much as I did!
    As always, if you have any questions, requests, or suggestions for people or organizations for me to interview, you can email me at david@gatewaywealthstl.com. Now, without further ado, here is my interview with Maxine Clark!
    Links
    Clark-Fox Family Foundation2018 IRS Form 990Delmar DivineBlueprint4SummerSTLProsper Women's CapitalSt. Louis Magazine FeatureNewswise FeatureWikipediaMaxine's Twitter

    • 59 min
    #15 - Metropolitan St. Louis Equal Housing and Opportunity Council - Will Jordan & Elizabeth Risch

    #15 - Metropolitan St. Louis Equal Housing and Opportunity Council - Will Jordan & Elizabeth Risch

    By: David M. Foster, CFP®, CAP®

    Hello, listeners, and welcome to the 15th episode of the Gateway Giving Podcast!
    Today, I have an interview with Will Jordan, the Executive Director, and Elisabeth Risch, the Assistant Director of the St. Louis Metropolitan Equal Housing and Opportunity Council (EHOC). The EHOC seeks to ensure equal access to housing and places of public accommodation for all people through education, counseling, investigation, and enforcement.
    It can be tempting to imagine that, since the Fair Housing Act has been in place for over 50 years now, housing discrimination is a thing of the past. But, as you’ll hear in this discussion, housing discrimination is alive and well. Even if it wasn’t, the legacy of past housing discrimination is still with us today.

    The median white family in the U.S. has a net worth that is roughly 10 times that of the median black family, and home equity, or the lack thereof, is the single greatest contributor to that gap. I am no expert on housing discrimination, historical or current, but I am an expert on building wealth and how compound interest works, and, from that lens, it’s easy to understand why this gap persists. Prior to the passage of the Fair Housing Act in 1968, it was legal to discriminate against someone for the purpose of housing based on the color of their skin, which means that, even if the Fair Housing Act had magically fixed everything overnight, most black families had to start from scratch on their home equity building journey, while white families had been on that journey for decades with lots of help from the federal government along the way.
    So, it makes sense that housing policy is one of the most important places to focus if we’re trying to right the wrongs of our past. The EHOC, like so many nonprofits in our area, is working hard not only to provide relief to those who are being wronged currently, but to change the way our region operates so that we can prevent these problems in the future. And, as you’ll hear in the interview, this isn’t just a racial issue. Housing discrimination cuts across all lines; income, race, family status, age, gender, etc. In fact, the number one source of housing discrimination today is against people with disabilities.
    As always, if you have any questions, requests, or suggestions for people or organizations for me to interview, you can email me at david@gatewaywealthstl.com. Now, without further ado, here is my interview with Will Jordan and Elisabeth Risch!

    Links
    EHOC HomepageDonate2019 IRS Form 990Report Housing DiscriminationKnow Your RightsEviction PreventionLandlord-Tenant CounselingFair Housing InvestigationOutreach & EducationAdvocacy & ResearchGateway Neighborhood FundTwitterFacebook

    • 1 hr 12 min
    #14 - How To Make An Impact With Your Charitable Giving - Grace Chiang Nicolette & Phil Buchanan

    #14 - How To Make An Impact With Your Charitable Giving - Grace Chiang Nicolette & Phil Buchanan

    By: David M. Foster, CFP®, CAP®

    Hello, listeners, and welcome to the 14th episode of the Gateway Giving Podcast!

    In a 2018 U.S. Trust study of philanthropy, 9 out of 10 households with a $200,000 household income and/or a net worth greater than $1 million gave money to charity. Disturbingly, among that same group of people, only 42% believed that their giving was having the impact they intended. The other 58% either believed that their giving was not having the intended impact, or, more frequently, they just didn’t know. This group gave an average of almost $30,000 in 2017, and the majority didn’t know if their generosity was helping anyone!

    You may or may not be a millionaire, but chances are, if you’re listening to this podcast, you are a giver, and you care about the impact of those gifts. So how can you make sure you’re among the 42% who is confident in the impact of their giving?

    My guests today have devoted their professional lives to answering that question. Phil Buchanan is the President of the Center For Effective Philanthropy, and Grace Chiang Nicolette is the VP of Programming & External Relations.

    If you’re looking for easy answers to the question of how to make sure your donations are having the desired impact, you won’t find them here. As I discuss with Grace and Phil, philanthropic effectiveness cannot be boiled down to an easy to understand and easy to compare metric the way that return on investment can be used to determine the success of an investment in a for-profit business. But, just because there are no easy answers doesn’t mean there are no answers at all. If you truly believe, as I do, that philanthropy is one of the best ways to impact the world and the community around you, then doing the hard work of determining effectiveness is worth it, and, in this interview, Grace and Phil offer several valuable insights to make that difficult task a little easier.

    As always, if you have any questions, requests, or suggestions for people or organizations for me to interview, you can email me at david@gatewaywealthstl.com. Now, without further ado, here is my interview with Grace Chiang Nicolette & Phil Buchanan!

    Links
    The Center For Effective PhilanthropyAbout CEPDonate2019 Form 9902019 Annual ReportCEP's Definition of Philanthropic EffectivenessHow Major Givers Can Best Support NonprofitsDonors: 5 Things Nonprofits Want You To KnowGiving Done Right BookGiving Done Right PodcastCEP's YouTube ChannelFacebookTwitterGrace's TwitterPhil's Twitter

    • 48 min

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