23 episodes

Join Certified Financial Planner, David Foster, as he interviews St. Louis area non-profit leaders from the perspective of a prospective donor and offers insights into how to make the greatest impact with your charitable donations.

Gateway Giving David Foster

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

Join Certified Financial Planner, David Foster, as he interviews St. Louis area non-profit leaders from the perspective of a prospective donor and offers insights into how to make the greatest impact with your charitable donations.

    #23 - Arch Grants - Gabe Angieri

    #23 - Arch Grants - Gabe Angieri

    By: David M. Foster, CFP®, CAP®

    Hello, listeners, and welcome to the 23rd episode of the Gateway Giving Podcast!
    My guest today is Gabe Angieri. Gabe is the Director of Development & Strategy for Arch Grants, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that provides $50,000 equity-free grants and access to an ecosystem of resources, helping early-stage startups grow and scale in St. Louis.
    To be honest, I was somewhat skeptical coming into this interview. Why should an organization that funds for-profit companies be granted nonprofit status? I don’t think many people would argue that giving equity-free grants to early-stage startups and then helping those startups to grow and scale is a bad thing for our region, but just because it’s a good thing doesn’t mean you should get a tax deduction for your donation to an organization that does that.
    However, Gabe successfully convinced me that Arch Grants is less venture capital fund and more economic development association. Obviously, the grants they give to these companies are good for the companies and their founders, but it’s also making a positive impact on the economic environment throughout our region, and economic wellbeing is an essential component of overall wellbeing.
    As always, if you have any questions, requests, or suggestions for people or organizations for me to interview, you can email me at david@gatewaywealthstl.com. Now, without further ado, here is my interview with Gabe!
    Gabe Angieri and Arch Grants are not affiliated with or endorsed by LPL Financial, Gateway Wealth Management, or Cornerstone Wealth Management.
    Links
    HomepageDonate2019 IRS Form 9902020 IRS Form 990AboutAnnual Startup CompetitionImpact Report

    • 53 min
    #22 - An Introduction To Effective Altruism - Harley Monk of Giving Alpha

    #22 - An Introduction To Effective Altruism - Harley Monk of Giving Alpha

    By: David M. Foster, CFP®, CAP®

    Hello, listeners, and welcome to the 22nd episode of the Gateway Giving Podcast!
    My guest today is Harley Monk. Harley is the Founder and Executive Director of Giving Alpha, a community of like-minded finance professionals that have committed to improving the world by donating to the most evidence-based, impactful interventions.
    Although Harley and I do spend some time discussing his organization, today’s episode primarily serves as an introduction to the “Effective Altruism” movement, a movement and a concept that is very near and dear to my heart.
    When I first decided a few years ago to devote my financial planning practice to working with philanthropists, one of the catalysts for that shift was a book I read called “The Life You Can Save” by a philosopher named Peter Singer. That book, originally published in 2009, kickstarted what is now known as the “Effective Altruism” movement. That movement makes, essentially, two arguments:
    If you live in the developed world (The U.S., Canada, Western Europe, Australia, Japan, etc.), then your income is likely at least in the top 10% globally, and very possibly in the top 1%. Therefore, you have a moral obligation to donate some of your income to help others who didn’t have the good fortune of being born into one of those rich countries.You should make your donations based on reason and evidence, not geography and sentiment.As you can imagine, telling people, particularly Americans, that they’re being selfish by hoarding their money and that when they do give, they’re probably doing it wrong, or at least inefficiently, sparks a visceral reaction among many. To some degree I had that same reaction when I was first introduced to these concepts, but I encourage you to keep an open mind before you dismiss them.
    One of the primary reasons people tend to list for either not giving or not giving more money to charity is because they are concerned that their donations won’t have the intended impact. If that describes you, then giving through the lens of “Effective Altruism” can help you to be confident that your good intentions are having real impact.
    As always, if you have any questions, requests, or suggestions for people or organizations for me to interview, you can email me at david@gatewaywealthstl.com. Now, without further ado, here is my interview with Harley!

    Links
    Giving Alpha HomepageAn Introduction To Effective AltruismDefining AlphaThe PledgeIs There Such A Thing As Bad Charity?

    • 49 min
    #21 - The International Institute Of St. Louis - Paul Costigan

    #21 - The International Institute Of St. Louis - Paul Costigan

    By: David M. Foster, CFP®, CAP®

    Hello, listeners, and welcome to the 21st episode of the Gateway Giving Podcast!

    Try to imagine, for a moment, that you’re living your life as you have always lived it, and, all of a sudden, in order to save your life and the lives of your family, you must flee to a foreign country with no money, no connections, no housing, and no job. This is the situation that Afghan refugees are facing today. As you are probably aware, the United States’ decision to pull all of our troops out of Afghanistan has caused massive societal upheaval and created tens of thousands of refugees out of the people who had been assisting the U.S. in its fight against the Taliban. The St. Louis area has agreed to take in up to 500 of those individuals.

    Luckily for them and for us, the International Institute of St. Louis is prepared to meet the challenge. It is their goal to help these people achieve self-sufficiency as quickly as possible. My guest today is Paul Costigan, the Sr. Vice President for Operations & Missouri Refugee Coordinator for the International Institute of St. Louis. He’ll tell you about how the International Institute works to achieve that goal of self-sufficiency through short term housing assistance, job training, English classes, and job placement, among other things.

    If you believe, as I do, that that the U.S. bears most of the responsibility for turning these people into refugees in the first place, and, thus, we are obligated to help them to escape their oppressors, then I think you’ll get a lot out of this interview.

    As always, if you have any questions, requests, or suggestions for people or organizations for me to interview, you can email me at david@gatewaywealthstl.com. Now, without further ado, here is my interview with Paul!

    Links
    HomepageDonateVolunteer2019 IRS Form 9902020 Annual ReportAbout UsFAQImmigrant Stories14 Most Common Arguments Against Immigration & Why They're WrongWelcome.USAirbnb Nonprofit FoundationOperation Allies Welcome

    • 58 min
    #20 - Fundraisers: 3 Dos and 3 Dont's of Asking My Clients For Money - A Modern Nonprofit Guest Appearance

    #20 - Fundraisers: 3 Dos and 3 Dont's of Asking My Clients For Money - A Modern Nonprofit Guest Appearance

    By: David M. Foster, CFP®, CAP®

    Hello, listeners, and welcome to the 20th episode of the Gateway Giving Podcast!
    For this episode, the tables have been turned! Tosha Anderson, who was my guest in episode #13 of this podcast, Assessing The Financial Health of a Nonprofit, has her own podcast called A Modern Nonprofit, and she had me on to talk about some of the mistakes I have seen nonprofit fundraisers make when asking my clients for money.
    If you are a donor, this topic may be less compelling to you, but if you work for a nonprofit, particularly if you are a fundraiser or development officer, or even if you’re just a volunteer, then you should absolutely listen to this episode!
    As always, if you have any questions, requests, or suggestions for people or organizations for me to interview, you can email me at david@gatewaywealthstl.com. Now, without further ado, here is Tosha's interview with me!
    Links
    The Charity CFOA Modern Nonprofit Facebook GroupCharity CFO YouTubeCharity CFO LinkedInCharity CFO TwitterCharity CFO FacebokTosha Anderson LinkedIn

    • 29 min
    #19 - Gateway Pet Guardians - Emily Stuart

    #19 - Gateway Pet Guardians - Emily Stuart

    By: David M. Foster, CFP®, CAP®

    Hello, listeners, and welcome to the 19th episode of the Gateway Giving Podcast!
    My guest today is Emily Stuart, the Executive Director of Gateway Pet Guardians, whose mission is to champion a thriving pet welfare community in East St. Louis, Cahokia Heights, Washington Park and Fairmont City, which they have coined the East Side Pet District.

    I have been hesitant to have any animal focused nonprofits on the podcast thus far, because it can be hard to justify donating money to a charity that works with animals when there are so many humans who need our help. Even if you don’t believe that animal suffering deserves the same attention as human suffering, I think there are still two compelling reasons to consider donating to animal welfare causes:
    A great deal of animal suffering is the result of human action or inaction. If we caused the mess, we should take responsibility for cleaning it up.At least in the case of Gateway Pet Guardians, a donation to their organization is just as much about the people in the community as it is the animals.I think about my dog, Rosemary, and the joy she brings my family and me, and I know that’s true for so many other families. We’re fortunate enough that we have the resources to take her to see a veterinarian who’s only about a 4 minute drive from our house, but that isn’t always true for the people who live in the East Side Pet District. Until Gateway Pet Guardians opened their facility in East St. Louis in 2020, there wasn’t a single veterinary clinic in the area!
    If you love animals, like I do, you’ll enjoy this interview!
    As always, if you have any questions, requests, or suggestions for people or organizations for me to interview, you can email me at david@gatewaywealthstl.com. Now, without further ado, here is my interview with Emily!
    Links
    HomepageDonateVolunteerFosterAmazon Wish ListAdoptYouTube Channel2020 Impact Report2020 IRS Form 9902019 IRS Form 9902020 Audited Financial Statements

    • 45 min
    #18 - Flance Early Learning Center - Latrice Dinkins, Aurdeen Clarkson, & Tami Timmer

    #18 - Flance Early Learning Center - Latrice Dinkins, Aurdeen Clarkson, & Tami Timmer

    By: David M. Foster, CFP®, CAP®

    Hello, listeners, and welcome to the 18th episode of the Gateway Giving Podcast!
    My guests today are Aurdeen Clarkson, Tami Timmer, and Latrice Dinkins, all of whom work for Flance Early Learning Center, a diverse, intentional early childhood education center that nurtures children and adults in a trusting culture of love, Respect, Accountability, Compassion and Consistency.

    Early childhood education is an issue that is near and dear to my heart, as I have two kids currently in an early childhood education center, and I have another kid who’s not far removed from one. In contrast with K-12 education in our country, early childhood education is primarily funded by tuition paid by the families utilizing those services. As a result, instead of spreading the costs of early childhood education across our communities, the way we do with K-12, the families who are currently utilizing those services have to foot the entire bill, which is usually somewhere between $1,000 and $1,500 per kid per month. This means that if you’re not in the top income quintile, you’re likely going to have to make some tough choices.
    You might decide not to send your kid to an ECEC because the cost would be greater than the amount you would earn from your job. Of course, for a parent who chooses to stay home with their kids, re-entering the workforce can prove challenging, and most people who find themselves in that situation will never be able to get back on their pre-kid income trajectory. And, of course, this phenomenon impacts women, disproportionately. Alternatively, you might decide to send your kid to a home-based daycare, but, if you do that, the odds are high that your kid will be less safe, and they won’t be instructed by someone who has an educational background in early childhood development. Lastly, you might just decide to bite the bullet and pay for the entire cost of a high quality ECEC, which has the potential to put a strain on the rest of your finances.
    Taking into consideration the context of what I’ve just described, what the staff at Flance Early Learning Center is doing is remarkable. They’re providing as high a quality of early childhood education as you’ll find in a state of the art facility, and they’re doing it in the poorest zip code in Missouri. A zip code where the median annual household income is roughly equivalent to the cost of providing high quality early childhood education to one infant for one year. Obviously, most of the families they serve don’t have the income to pay full tuition, which means that they rely heavily on philanthropy, as well as government grants through the Head Start Program that is administered, in our area, by Youth In Need.
    As always, if you have any questions, requests, or suggestions for people or organizations for me to interview, you can email me at david@gatewaywealthstl.com. Now, without further ado, here is my interview with Latrice, Aurdeen, and Tami!

    Links
    HomepageDonateVolunteer2019 Annual Report2019 IRS Form 990HistoryFacebook

    • 58 min

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