10 episodes

The German Law Journal has been providing Open Access to Comparative, European, and International Law for over 20 years. Listen to #GLJShorts to find out what our most recent articles are about and to meet the person behind the paper. Listen to #GLJSpecials to dive deeper into selected articles or for an introduction into our most recent Special Issues. Find video versions of our podcasts on our YouTube channel!

German Law Journal: GLJ Shorts and GLJ Specials Nora Markard, Emanuel V. Towfigh, and the other Editors of the German Law Journal

    • Science

The German Law Journal has been providing Open Access to Comparative, European, and International Law for over 20 years. Listen to #GLJShorts to find out what our most recent articles are about and to meet the person behind the paper. Listen to #GLJSpecials to dive deeper into selected articles or for an introduction into our most recent Special Issues. Find video versions of our podcasts on our YouTube channel!

    GLJ Short: Sex Must Be Voluntary: Sexual Communication and the New Definition of Rape in Sweden (GLJ 22:5)

    GLJ Short: Sex Must Be Voluntary: Sexual Communication and the New Definition of Rape in Sweden (GLJ 22:5)

    “Sex must be voluntary; if it’s not, it’s a crime,” reads the Swedish government’s ad campaign. The new Swedish rape law is all about communicating consent – “listen, ask, and tune in so that you’re sure what others really want,” the ad continues. Feminists have long campaigned against rape laws that require active resistance from the victim, even where lack of consent is clear. But is rape really just about a failure of communication? What about power and patriarchy? And what about the grey zones that show up in empirical studies on sex communication?

    Linnea Wegerstad looks at how the new law has been applied so far, whether it really brings the clarity it promises, and what needs to happen outside of the law for it to work. Her article “Sex Must Be Voluntary: Sexual Communication and the New Definition of Rape in Sweden“ appeared in the Special Issue “Sexual Violence and Criminal Justice in the 21st Century” in GLJ vol. 22:5 in August 2021.

    Interview by GLJ editor Nora Markard, editing by Marlene Stiller.

    • 6 min
    GLJ Special: Sexual Violence and Criminal Justice in the 21st Century (GLJ 22:5)

    GLJ Special: Sexual Violence and Criminal Justice in the 21st Century (GLJ 22:5)

    Over the last years, mass protests against sexualized violence against women have led to law reform in many countries. They were sparked by shocking rape cases as well as #MeToo and similar campaigns. The Istanbul Convention provides an international framework for what is sometimes called "carceral feminism." Time to take stock and to evaluate the impact of the consent paradigm, the influence of social movements, and the limits of criminal law, both at the national and the international level.

    Listen to Boris Burghardt and Leonie Steinl as they talk about their Special Issue "Sexual Violence and Criminal Justice in the 21st Century," how they collected contributions from around the world and from different disciplines, what insights they took away from this, and what their next projects are. And of course, find out who would play Boris in a movie and what Leonie would have done instead of becoming an academic!

    The Special Issue appeared in August 2021 in GLJ 22:5. GLJ editor Nora Markard is the host, editing by Marlene Stiller.

    • 14 min
    GLJ Short – Extra: Highlights from the GLJ's 2020 volume

    GLJ Short – Extra: Highlights from the GLJ's 2020 volume

    This episode offers a hand-picked selection of highlights from the German Law Journal’s 2020 volume. It presents articles that may not (yet) have the download numbers they deserve – some algorithm detox, brought to you by GLJ Co-editor-in-chief Matthias Goldmann. All articles are vailable Open Access via our website: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/german-law-journal.

    Editing by Marlene Stiller.

    • 11 min
    GLJ Special: Socio-Legal Studies in Germany and the UK: Theory and Methods (GLJ 21:7)

    GLJ Special: Socio-Legal Studies in Germany and the UK: Theory and Methods (GLJ 21:7)

    Germany and the UK are marked by quite different legal cultures, institutional contexts, and scholarly traditions. But how does this shape socio-legal scholarship situated in those contexts? And how does this play out when studying labor law, contracts, transnational law, or urban law? What are the key contemporary trends, theoretical applications, and methodological approaches in both socio-legal academic contexts?

    Meet one of our editors-in-chief, Jen Hendry, as she and Naomi Creutzfeldt and Christian Boulanger talk about their Special Issue "Socio-Legal Studies in Germany and the UK: Theory and Methods," what made the project so fascinating to them, what insights it produced, and what their next projects are. And of course, find out what advice Christian received from his grandma, what Naomi is missing while working from home, and who would play Jen in a movie!

    The Special Issue appeared in October 2020 in GLJ 21:7. GLJ editor Nora Markard is the host, editing by Marlene Stiller.

    • 22 min
    GLJ Short: Exploring the Potentials of International Criminal Law and the Right to Rescue (GLJ 21:3)

    GLJ Short: Exploring the Potentials of International Criminal Law and the Right to Rescue (GLJ 21:3)

    States in the global north have been seeking to create a distance between them and migrants drowning or being abused, in an effort to avoid jurisdiction. Can international criminal law or the civil rights of Search and Rescue NGOs create a bridge for accountability? ICL's ability to also address "banal crimes against humanity" and to express their injustice makes it interesting for strategic litigation, while activists exercising their sincerely held beliefs by performing Search and Rescue may be bringing human rights jurisdiction into the "legal black holes" at sea.

    In this GLJ Shorts episode, Yannis Kalpouzos and Itamar Mann present their articles "International Criminal Law and the Violence against Migrants" and "The Right to Perform Rescue at Sea: Jurisprudence and Drowning." Both articles appeared in the Special Issue "Border Justice: Migration and Accountability for Human Rights Violations" in GLJ vol. 21:3 in April 2020. Interview by German Law Journal editor Nora Markard, editing by Marlene Stiller.

    • 10 min
    GLJ Short: Holding EASO and Frontex Accountable (GLJ 21:3)

    GLJ Short: Holding EASO and Frontex Accountable (GLJ 21:3)

    EU agencies have an ever increasing role in the EU asylum system – raising the question how they can be held accountable. EASO is supposed to only support Greek authorities in the asylum procedure, but in fact determines the decision. Meanwhile, Frontex is charge of highly human-rights sensitive border operations. For both agencies, accountability gaps are notorious. Do extrajudicial mechanisms, such as the European Ombudsman, or mechanisms not designed for human rights claims, such as the action for damages, provide avenues to hold them accountable?

    In this GLJ Shorts episode, Melanie Fink and Lilian Tsourdi present their articles "Holding the European Asylum Support Office Accountable for its role in Asylum Decision-Making: Mission Impossible?" and "The Action for Damages as a Fundamental Rights Remedy: Holding Frontex Liable." Both articles appeared in the Special Issue "Border Justice: Migration and Accountability for Human Rights Violations" in GLJ vol. 21:3 in April 2020. Interview by German Law Journal editor Nora Markard, editing by Marlene Stiller.

    • 6 min

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